Notes from Story Time Category: Writing

Little Plane Learns to Write

In this story, Little Plane is learning how to write. During the story, there are a few activities you can do that will also help your child learn to write. Learning about writing is an important part of learning how to read.

Cheerios

Reading and writing go together. Writing helps children understand that print has meaning. The beginning of writing for very young children is learning how to use their hands and fingers so that later they will be able to hold crayons and pencils.

When your baby is old enough, encourage him or her to pick up cheerios.  This gives them practice with fine motor skills, and eye-hand coordination. These skills will come in handy when children begin to learn to hold a pencil!

My Name Is . . . .

Writing helps build early literacy skills. Writing starts as scribbles by children. This then develops into letters, words, and sentences. When children are learning to write, the first letter they usually remember is the first letter in their name. Practicing this letter as well as their name and other words that start with this letter will help them learn new words and how to write them.

Penguins Love Colors

As you read a book to your child, point to the words in the title and any words written in a different color or font.  This will help your child understand that writing has meaning.

How to Draw a Dragon

This book talks about how to draw a dragon. Have your child try to draw a dragon as he/she listens to each step. Children learn to draw before they learn to write words, so practicing drawing is a great way to prepare for learning how to write.

Sign Me a Story

Children need to develop fine motor skills in their fingers in order to control a pencil or crayon to draw or write. Teach your child a few words in American Sign Language using the book So Many Feelings.  This is a way for children to communicate with their hands. Not only will this help children practice fine motor control, but it gives them another way to express themselves.

 

 

Reading and Writing Go Together

Reading and writing go together. Writing helps children learn that letters and words stand for sounds and that print has meaning. One simple way you can show this to children is to occasionally point to the words as you read to them. Take opportunities to write down what children say as they tell it to you. Then you can read it back to them. This activity helps children can learn the connection between the written and the spoken word. It is also very motivating for them to tell their own stories.

Rainbow Fun

Remember, playing, talking, singing, reading, and writing are five simple practices to help your child on the path to reading. After reading aloud Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert, talk about the colors of the rainbow.  Then ask your child to draw a rainbow.  Learning how to hold a crayon correctly is one of the first steps in learning how to write.  Afterwards, encourage your child to plant a make-believe garden full of the flowers found in the book.

Making Soup

Reading and writing go together. Right now, your child may only write scribbles, but that’s okay. When learning to write, children need fine motor skills to hold a pencil and eye-hand coordination. Practicing writing (even if it is only scribbles) strengthens these skills.  After reading Stone Soup, encourage your child to “write” their own recipe for soup.  Then pretend to make the soup using the recipe. This way children see that writing is important and has meaning.

Thunder Boy Jr.

thunder-boyBy spending time talking about a name, we are calling attention to the connection between spoken word and print. In this story, Thunder Boy Jr. doesn’t like his name and wants a new one. It is the tradition in some communities that when you get older, you get a new name to show something you’ve done or what people hope you will do.  Talk to your child about what he/she would like their new name to be.  Write this name on a piece of paper and ask your child to draw you a picture.