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Fiction: The Deep by Nick Cutter

Cover of The DeepNick Cutter’s claustrophobic sophomore novel, The Deep is an unsettling look at the descent into madness. Across the globe, humans are coming down with a horrendous disease called ’Gets. It starts small. The individuals might forget where a parked car is or a wedding anniversary, but then people forget how to read or tie their shoes, and finally their lungs forget to breathe and their heart forgets to beat. Eight miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, a possible cure has been discovered in a research facility, but communication has suddenly gone silent, and it is up to Luke, brother of the genius scientist working on the cure, to reestablish communication. Yet, unimaginable psychological and physical terrors face him, and at eight miles deep there is no escape.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 15, 2015 Categories: Books, Horror

Book Discussion Questions: Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

Cover of Cutting for StoneTitle: Cutting for Stone
Author: Abraham Verghese
Page Count: 688 pages
Genre:  Literary Fiction,  Family Sagas
Tone: Haunting, Moving, Richly Detailed

Summary from publisher:
Marion and Shiva Stone are twin brothers born of a secret union between a beautiful Indian nun and a brash British surgeon. Orphaned by their mother’s death and their father’s disappearance, bound together by a preternatural connection and a shared fascination with medicine, the twins come of age as Ethiopia hovers on the brink of revolution.

Moving from Addis Ababa to New York City and back again, Cutting for Stone is an unforgettable story of love and betrayal, medicine and ordinary miracles—and two brothers whose fates are forever intertwined

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

“Writing has many similarities to the practice of internal medicine. Both require astute observation and a fondness for detail.”

“At heart I am a physician. It is my first and only calling. As a physician, things move me, and one way to talk about these things is to write about them. For me writing and medicine are not different parts, it is seamless, the same world view: fiction and healing promote the same cause.
~Abraham Verghese

1. As you reflect on this complex story, which scenes stand out in your memory? Why did those particular moments have such impact?

2. At the end of chapter 31 (379-380), Marion reflects on his home, including this statement: “I felt ecstatic, as if I was at the epicenter of our family…” Does this seem arrogant or appropriate for an adolescent to say? In what ways is Marion the epicenter of the book?

3. In what ways is Shiva something of a mystery to the reader? [Also consider, “’What I do is simple. I repair holes,’ said Shiva Praise Stone. Yes, but you make them, too, Shiva.” (577)]

4. Talk about Marion’s parting from his family when he is forced to leave the country (444).

5. Think about how the character of Genet is portrayed at different points. [e.g., “I wanted out of Africa. I began to think that Genet had done me a favor after all.” (457) and “she found her greatness, at last, found it in her suffering.” (601)] How is she integral to the story? How do you feel about her?

6. For a story that most often takes place in small settings with few people, somehow it has an epic “feel”. How is that?

7. When Ghosh returns from prison (350-351), he and Marion talk about a well-known story about a man who couldn’t rid himself of his slippers.

“The slippers in the story mean that everything you see and do and touch, every seed you sow, or don’t sow, becomes part of your destiny.”

Ghosh then shares about his past and has a lesson for Marion.

“I hope one day you see this as clearly as I did…The key to your happiness is to own your slippers, own who you are, own how you look, own your family, own the talents you have, and own the ones you don’t. If you keep saying your slippers aren’t yours, then you’ll die searching, you’ll die bitter, always feeling you were promised more. Not only our actions, but also our omissions, become our destiny.”

Do you agree? Are these sentiments borne out in the novel? What is the role of fate throughout?

8. In what ways is this book about legacy? About exile? Betrayal? Forgiveness?

9. Marion states that he became a physician not to save the world but to heal himself. Do you think he was healed in the end?

10. What do the female characters in the book reveal about what life is like for women in Ethiopia?

11. Did the medical detail add to the novel or detract from it?

12. The latter portion of the book contains commentary on medical practice in America, especially regarding foreign physicians (e.g., 492). Did this seem significant to you?

13. Did “The Afterbird” offer closure for you? For the characters? How did you react to its revelations?

14. Remember Stone’s favorite question? [What treatment in an emergency is administered by ear? words of comfort] How is this poignant, especially given Stone’s choices and manner?

15. What is the role of sexuality in Cutting for Stone? How would you characterize the scenes that are depicted, especially between Marion and Genet?

16. What romantic relationships are central to the story? How so?

17. Though the book earned excellent reviews, it wasn’t in nearly as much demand as it seems to be now. Why do you think that is? With over 600 pages, it isn’t an easy choice for book groups, but that doesn’t seem to be a concern. Did the length bother you?

18. Few works of fiction include a bibliography or an acknowledgment section which credits many literary allusions included in the story. Does this affect your opinion of the book?

19.Verghese said that his aim in writing Cutting for Stone was “to tell a great story, an old-fashioned, truth-telling story.” He has also said “my ambition was to write a big sweeping novel into which you could disappear, travel away as though in a space-ship, disappear, meet exciting people, and return to find that only a couple of days had passed in real life. That’s what happens to me when I am reading a good book.” In your opinion, did he succeed?

Other Resources

Lit Lovers book discussion questions
One Book One City resources
Video of Abraham Verghese discussing Cutting for Stone
Frequently asked questions answered by Abraham Verghese
Radio interview with Verghese on Ethiopia

If you liked Cutting for Stone, try...

Cover of Desirable DaughtersCover of Beneath the Lion's Gaze Cover of God of Small Things

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desirable Daughters by Bharati Mukherjee
Beneath the Lion’s Gaze by Maaza Mengiste
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 14, 2015 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Literary

Staff Pick: Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

Cathleen_2014A sure cure for winter glums is an energetic Broadway cast recording, and Beautiful: The Carole King Musical strikes all the right chords: irresistible oldies, show-biz success story, and a dazzling Tony Award-winning performance by lead actress Jessie Mueller. Turn the grey into “One Fine Day” with a remarkable life in song.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on January 13, 2015 Categories: Music, Picks by Cathleen, Staff Picks

Fiction: Stealing Adda by Tamara Leigh

Stealing Adda book coverAdda Sinclair is a successful romance novelist known for her skill with male characters. If only that insight translated into real life! Her husband left her for her arch-rival, a pretty-boy cover model is more interested than she is, and the attractive publisher with plans to brand her books for male readers keeps her off-balance. What’s a girl with writer’s block and too little romance in her personal life to do? In Stealing Adda, it will take a public scandal, multiple misunderstandings, and a spiritual awakening to illuminate what’s most important. Author Tamara Leigh has created a funny and relatable heroine who comes to realize that roadblocks in life might serve a higher purpose and that perhaps she has it in her to write her own happily ever after.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on January 12, 2015 Categories: Books, Humor, Romance

New: Historical Fiction and Romance

Every other Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

New: Historical Fiction Books

Cover of Faint Promise of Rain Cover of The Empty Throne Cover of The May Bride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faint Promise of Rain by Anjali Mitter Duva
The Empty Throne by Bernard Cornwell
The May Bride by Suzannah Dunn

Cover of The LodgerCover of The Ambassadors Cover of Vanessa and Her Sister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lodger by Louisa Treger
The Ambassadors by George Lerner
Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar

New: Romance Books

Cover of The Kraken KingCover of Only Enchanting Cover of Caged in Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Kraken King by Meljean Brook
Only Enchanting by Mary Balogh
Caged in Winter by Brighton Walsh

Cover of Rogue SpyCover of The Wishing SeasonCover of In the Cards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rogue Spy by Joanna Bourne
The Wishing Season by Denise Hunter
In the Cards by Jamie Beck

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 9, 2015 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, New Arrivals, Romance

Fiction: The Silent Wife by A.S.A. Harrison

The Silent WifeJodi is a therapist in a long-term committed relationship with Todd even though Todd is a serial cheater. While not a particularly traditional relationship, as long as they don’t talk about how unfaithful he is, their relationship works. “Men aren’t perfect, ” Jodi tells herself, and life continues to go on: Jodi immerses herself in her own routines, Todd immerses himself in other women, and everything is okay.

Except everything is not okay.

At the beginning of the book Jodi admits she is going to kill Todd. And she does. Alternating between Todd and Jodi as unreliable narrators, A.S.A. Harrison details the slow decent of a woman reaching her snapping point in The Silent Wife.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 8, 2015 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

Staff Pick: The Beatles Anthology

Picture of ColleenThe Beatles Anthology is a must-watch for any Beatles fan.  Filled with interviews and rare live performances, this is a comprehensive collection of the history of The Beatles.  Be prepared to binge watch: once you start, you won’t want to stop!

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 6, 2015 Categories: Movies and TV, Music, Picks by Colleen, Staff Picks

Audiobook: Joyland by Stephen King

Joyland audiobook coverStephen King can spin tales like few others.  He may be known for horror, but keep in mind he is also responsible for more emotive works such as The Green Mile, The Shawshank Redemption, and Stand by Me.  In Joyland, a college student takes seasonal work with an amusement park and sets aside heartbreak to grow a friendship with a frail boy and his overprotective young mother.  Lighthearted adventures at the park are offset by rumors of a vicious murder that once happened on one of the rides. Those with an appetite for the unexplained will still be satisfied, but there is an underlying sweetness as well.  Narrator Michael Kelly wisely gives a soft-spoken, earnest reading that juggles the wonder of coming into one’s own with a carnival ride of great storytelling.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on January 5, 2015 Categories: Audiobooks, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

Nonfiction: Challenge Yourself in the New Year

While the new year has already begun, it is not too late to try living this year a little differently! Tara Bannon Williamson shares books in which the author commits his or herself to accomplish a certain thing for a year. Check out some of the books she mentions below!

 

Cover of Up for Renewak Cover of Halfway to Heaven Cover of The Know It All

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up for Renewal by Cathy Alter
Halfway to Heaven
by Mark Obmascik
The Know-It-All by A. J. Jacobs

Reading the OED  Living Oprahhelping Me Help Myself

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading the OED by Ammon Shea
Living Oprah
by Robyn Okrant
Helping Me Help Myself
by Beth Lisick

Cover of Not Buying ItCover of Plenty Cover of My Jesus Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Buying It by Judith Levine
Plenty
by Alisa Smith and J.B. Mackinnon
My Jesus Year
by Benyamin Cohen

Cover of Candy GirlCover of Animal, Vegetable, MiracleCover of Give it Up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candy Girl by Diablo Cody
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle
by Barbara Kingsolver
Give It Up!
by Mary Carlomagno

 

Interested in finding more yearly challenges or book reading challenges? Stop by the Fiction/AV/Teen desk on the second floor and speak with a Readers’ Advisor to help you find something that will suit your reading tastes and goals.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 2, 2015 Categories: Books, Nonfiction

Fiction: Reunion by Hannah Pittard

Cover of Reunion

Kate is thousands of dollars in debt, her husband found out she cheated on him, her career as a screenwriter is failing, and her father has just committed suicide. Now she is being pushed into a miserable few days as she and her older brother and sister return to Atlanta to face the house, multiple ex-wives, and stepchildren their father has left behind. Reunion is a quirky intimate look at family with all of its dysfunction told from the eyes of Kate, an endearing yet at times cringe-worthy narrator. Hannah Pittard has integrated humor and heart as Kate hits her rock bottom, sinks a little further, and tries to figure out her way back up again.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on January 1, 2015 Categories: Books