Staff Picks 4 Kids Category: Funny

Wedgie & Gizmo by Suzanne Selfors

Wedgie & Gizmo book coverGizmo is a diabolical evil genius. He is also a guinea pig and the pet of Elliot. However, Gizmo calls him his faithful servant. Wedgie is the energetic corgi dog that belongs to Jasmine, Jackson, and their Mom. He also believes that he is a super hero and wears a cape around that Jasmine put on him. When Elliot’s dad marries Jasmine and Jackson’s mom, everyone must now live together. Wedgie loves having more humans to protect, but Gizmo would rather not have to live in Jasmine’s Barbie playhouse or with an arch nemesis like Wedgie. This funny chapter book is written in the same style as Jedi Academy and Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but instead of humans’ point of view, it is told from Wedgie and Gizmo’s.

Book reviewed by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

I am not a chair! by Ross Burach

Cover image for I am not a chair!Here’s a super funny story about giraffe’s first day in the jungle, when all the other animals think he’s a chair! After a full day of being sat on, giraffe has had it. He’s just about to tell the next animal he sees that he is not a chair, when along comes lion and boy is lion hungry! Read the book to see what happens after that! Hint: It’s hilarious! Try reading this to preschoolers or kindergarteners  and see if they can spot the turtle at the end of the book.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

My Pet Humanby Yasmine Surovec

Cover image for My pet humanGet inside the mind of a street-smart cat in this fun, beginning chapter book filled with black and white cartoon drawings. The cat, later named Oliver, knows the best places to find food and how to avoid getting caught by animal control. Oliver has friends—a rat, a dog, and another cat—but they all go home to their humans every night. Oliver is pretty sure he’s OK with this; anyway, he likes being “Mr. Independent.” However, when he smells something tasty coming from the house that a family has just moved into, Oliver decides to drop by…just for a little while. The “little human” girl falls immediately in love with him, so Oliver decides that if this arrangement is going to work, he will need to train the humans in the house. Does it work? Fans of funny animal stories like Stick Dog, Bad Kitty, and Diva and Flea will enjoy this book. For more, follow up with the sequel, My Pet Human Takes Center Stage.

 

Book reviewed by Dana F. Assistant Head of Youth Services

Purloining of Prince Oleomargerine by Mark Twain and Philip C. Stead

Cover image for The purloining of Prince OleomargarineHooray Mark Twain has a new book out! Well sort of, Mark Twain used to make up bedtime stories for his children and this story is based on the recently found notes he left for one of those stories. Those notes made it into the hands of Phillip Stead to turn into a completed story and Stead does a remarkable job of capturing Twain’s humor and voice.  Phillip’s wife, Caldecott winner Erin Stead, adds the perfect illustrations to bring the story to life in her classic style. This book is not like anything else out there right now and don’t miss reading it!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Princess Cora and the Crocodile by Laura Amy Schlitz

Cover image for Princess Cora and the crocodilePrincess Cora never gets to have any fun. Ever since she was born, her parents have been busy preparing her to become queen. This includes taking three baths a day, studying boring books on how to run a kingdom, and exercising so that she’ll be strong. She writes a letter to her fairy godmother, but instead of getting the furry, golden dog she wants, a box with a crocodile shows up. The plan is to have the crocodile pretend to be Princess Cora so that Cora can have a day to do whatever she wants. Outfitted in a pink dress and wearing a mop for a wig, the crocodile sort of convinces the nanny, King, and Queen that he’s Princess Cora. But when he gets too frustrated and ends up biting everyone, Princess Cora comes to their rescue and strikes a deal for more fun-filled days. Try this book if you enjoy the Princess in Black or Mercy Watson series.

Book reviewed by Dana F. Assistant Head of Youth Services

Yours Sincerely, Giraffe by Megumi Iwasa

Cover image for Yours sincerely, giraffeGiraffe is bored and looking for a friend, so he writes a letter for Pelican to deliver across the horizon. There Pelican finds Penguin, and a series of letters result, with some pretty funny misunderstandings when Giraffe decides to dress up as his new friend, Penguin, and visit him. Since Giraffe has never seen a penguin before, he makes all kinds of mistakes on the costume. This is a super funny titles that would also make a great read aloud to young children, classrooms, or families. Just remember to show the great illustrations that really bring the story to life.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Hilo Book 1: The Boy Who Crashed to Earth by Judd Winick

Cover image for Hilo. Book 1, The boy who crashed to EarthSuper powers? Check! Robots? Check? Aliens? Check! What else could you ask for in a graphic novel! The Hilo series has it all. D.J. and Gina find a mysterious boy, Hilo, who fell from the sky. Together the new friends help Hilo find out who he is and just what he might be capable of. Hilo will have to learn fast though since he wasn’t the only thing to fall to Earth! I loved reading about this modern boy super hero and the friendships he made.  Besides, who wouldn’t want to go to school with a super hero!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Stick Dog by Tom Watson

Cover image for Stick DogHere’s a great series for fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid or anyone that likes funny chapter books with some illustrations! Stick Dog and his four friends – Stripes, Mutt, Poo-Poo and Karen – scheme to get some delicious looking hamburgers from a family at the park. Distractions and obstacles abound. Will clever Stick Dog find a way to feast? Don’t forget to check out Stick Dog’s other hilarious adventures! Not a dog person? Don’t worry there’s also Stick Cat!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Restart by Gordon Korman

Cover image for Restart : lose your memory, find your lifeWhat do you think it would be like to lose your memory? You don’t remember your family, friends, or what you were like before the amnesia. That’s what happened to Chase Ambrose in Restart by Gordon Korman.

Nobody really knows why he was up there, but Chase fell off the roof of his house and was lucky to survive with only bumps, bruises, and a concussion with the loss of his memory.

It turns out that Chase was a star football player at his middle school and was quite the bully. But he doesn’t remember any of that! The other kids at his school remember all too well and it takes some time for them to trust and adjust to the new Chase Ambrose who is nice, helpful, and hard-working…unlike the old Chase Ambrose who was mean, hurtful and, quite possibly, a thief.

Everyone wonders whether Chase will go back to his old ways as his memory gradually returns or move forward with this fresh start. Very few people ever get a second chance like this and the question remains: Will Chase take this chance?

I recommend this book for 4th through 6th graders who like realistic, humorous fiction, with the slightest touch of mystery.

Book reviewed by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and John Jory

Cover image for The terrible twoIf you like funny books and are up for a good prank or two, then have I got the book for you, The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and John Jory. In it, Miles Murphy assumes he will be the school prankster when he moves to Yawnee Valley, “the cow capital of the United States, this side of the Mississippi, excluding a couple of towns that cheat.” Unfortunately, his new school already has a resident prankster. An epic prank war ensues to prove just who can pull the best prank and trick their principle, teachers, and classmates. My favorite prank involves cows, but don’t worry you don’t have to like cows to enjoy the hilarity of it all.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian