Notes from Story Time Category: Reading

What Kind of Truck Is This?

Reading books is a great way to introduce your child to new vocabulary words.  It is okay to stop the story to talk about what the words mean.  While reading Machines at Work, talk to your child about different kinds of trucks.

Penguins Love Colors

As you read a book to your child, point to the words in the title and any words written in a different color or font.  This will help your child understand that writing has meaning.

Reading and Writing Go Together

Reading and writing go together. Writing helps children learn that letters and words stand for sounds and that print has meaning. One simple way you can show this to children is to occasionally point to the words as you read to them. Take opportunities to write down what children say as they tell it to you. Then you can read it back to them. This activity helps children can learn the connection between the written and the spoken word. It is also very motivating for them to tell their own stories.

Rainbow Fun

Remember, playing, talking, singing, reading, and writing are five simple practices to help your child on the path to reading. After reading aloud Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert, talk about the colors of the rainbow.  Then ask your child to draw a rainbow.  Learning how to hold a crayon correctly is one of the first steps in learning how to write.  Afterwards, encourage your child to plant a make-believe garden full of the flowers found in the book.

Making Soup

Reading and writing go together. Right now, your child may only write scribbles, but that’s okay. When learning to write, children need fine motor skills to hold a pencil and eye-hand coordination. Practicing writing (even if it is only scribbles) strengthens these skills.  After reading Stone Soup, encourage your child to “write” their own recipe for soup.  Then pretend to make the soup using the recipe. This way children see that writing is important and has meaning.