Notes from Story Time Category: Reading

What’s Happening in This Story?

That's (Not) Mine by Anna KangAs you read That’s (Not) Mine by Anna Kang, talk to your child about what is happening in the illustrations. By talking about what is happening, children learn that there is a beginning, middle, and end in a story.

Reading, Writing, and Wrapping Paper

Writing and reading development support one another.  As children become aware of print, they begin to understand that the print is what you are reading—not the pictures. They start to see print everywhere in their world and to understand that it represents meaning and the spoken word.  It is also important to have your child practice scribbling even before they know how to form letters.

Try this fun activity at home to help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.  After you read a birthday book such as I Got a Chicken for My Birthday, give your child a piece of wrapping paper for your child to wrinkle, tear, bend, and fold. These motions will help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.

What Does This Mean?

Reading and talking with your child helps build vocabulary by introducing new words. When you read a book to your child, it’s okay to stop briefly to point out a new word and what it means.

Why Read Aloud to Your Baby?

Reading aloud to babies exposes them to more words than they hear in conversation. Machines at Work by Byron Barton contains unusual words such as rubble and cement. It’s okay if babies don’t understand all the words they hear.  They are still learning about language while they listen.

Read to Me

 Make reading fun by engaging your child in the story by reading lift-the-flap books, singing as you read, or talking to your baby about things they see in the pictures.  It’s more important that reading to your child is enjoyable rather than long. Follow your child’s mood.

Read It Again!

Has your child found a favorite book that you feel like you are reading over and over again? Keep reading! There is value to be found even in repeated sharing of a book– exposure to familiar words helps to build vocabulary.

Reading Is Fun!

It’s easy to make reading with your child a positive and enjoyable experience; just follow your child’s lead! While it’s a good idea to add reading together as part of a daily routine, remember that it’s always okay to put a book down and come back to it later if your child does not seem to enjoy reading at that moment.

Clothesline Clues

By reading Clothesline Clues to Jobs People Do with your child and pointing to some of the key words and pictures, you can demonstrate how the pictures correlate with the words. The final page asks a question which will generate dialogue with children.

Flip, Flap, Fly

Having your baby act out parts of a book is a good way to keep him/her engaged in reading.  Have your baby flap their arms as they pretend to be a bird or wiggle like a snake as you read aloud Flip, Flap, Fly by Phyllis Root.

Reading and Rhyming

Reading rhyming books, such as Where’s Pup?, helps kids improve their oral language skills, which help them become readers.  Rhyming is a fun and easy thing to incorporate into your day.