Notes from Story Time Category: Reading

Coloring

colorful crayonsColoring is a great way to practice hand-eye coordination needed for reading and writing.  Talk to your child about their drawing and label some of the items in the picture.  Point out the words to your child.  This shows that printed letters stand for spoken words.

Fables

The Lion and the MouseFables and other traditional stories are great to read with your child, and you can tell them in different ways. As you read the wordless picture book The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney, you might want to use the text of the story from the Library of Congress’ free database at www.read.gov/aesop/007. This shows that words of one version of the story work with the illustrations from another version and that words and pictures have meaning.

What’s Happening in This Story?

That's (Not) Mine by Anna KangAs you read That’s (Not) Mine by Anna Kang, talk to your child about what is happening in the illustrations. By talking about what is happening, children learn that there is a beginning, middle, and end in a story.

Reading, Writing, and Wrapping Paper

Writing and reading development support one another.  As children become aware of print, they begin to understand that the print is what you are reading—not the pictures. They start to see print everywhere in their world and to understand that it represents meaning and the spoken word.  It is also important to have your child practice scribbling even before they know how to form letters.

Try this fun activity at home to help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.  After you read a birthday book such as I Got a Chicken for My Birthday, give your child a piece of wrapping paper for your child to wrinkle, tear, bend, and fold. These motions will help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.

What Does This Mean?

Reading and talking with your child helps build vocabulary by introducing new words. When you read a book to your child, it’s okay to stop briefly to point out a new word and what it means.