Staff Picks 4 Kids Category: Picks by Keary B.

Life by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Brendan Wenzel

Cover image for LifeHow could you go wrong with writing by Cynthia Rylant and illustrations by Caldecott honor winner Brendan Wenzel? And really, the text and art are both winners here. The artwork, full of vibrant animals and the beauty of nature, accompanies an uplifting text about everything there is to love in life and all of life’s changes. This would be a great gift at graduations! Also, it’s recommended for anyone facing a major transition in their life, as well as those who enjoy sharing a sentimental book with a loved one.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Purloining of Prince Oleomargerine by Mark Twain and Philip C. Stead

Cover image for The purloining of Prince OleomargarineHooray Mark Twain has a new book out! Well sort of, Mark Twain used to make up bedtime stories for his children and this story is based on the recently found notes he left for one of those stories. Those notes made it into the hands of Phillip Stead to turn into a completed story and Stead does a remarkable job of capturing Twain’s humor and voice.  Phillip’s wife, Caldecott winner Erin Stead, adds the perfect illustrations to bring the story to life in her classic style. This book is not like anything else out there right now and don’t miss reading it!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Yours Sincerely, Giraffe by Megumi Iwasa

Cover image for Yours sincerely, giraffeGiraffe is bored and looking for a friend, so he writes a letter for Pelican to deliver across the horizon. There Pelican finds Penguin, and a series of letters result, with some pretty funny misunderstandings when Giraffe decides to dress up as his new friend, Penguin, and visit him. Since Giraffe has never seen a penguin before, he makes all kinds of mistakes on the costume. This is a super funny titles that would also make a great read aloud to young children, classrooms, or families. Just remember to show the great illustrations that really bring the story to life.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman

Cover image for Book scavengerA cross country move, secret puzzles, mysterious clues, bumbling bad guys, and a race to find the answers all equals one action filled book! In the Book Scavenger, Emily and her new friend James race around San Francisco as they solve clues and decode secret messages. It all started when Emily and James found a mysterious book in the subway. However, a couple of strange men want the book and are only a step or two behind. Read this book if you like puzzles, problem solving, and mysteries.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

The Matchstick Castle by Keir Graff

Cover image for The matchstick castleIf you combined the books Pippi Longstockings by Astid Lindgren and Floors by Patrick Carman it would probably look a lot like The Matchstick Castle by Keir Graff, which is full of over the top characters and an unbelievable house. Readers who are drawn to unusual settings will be pleased to discover the wondrous rooms in the Matchstick Castle including a ship on the roof, underground mines, and who knows how many mazes, trap doors, and secret passages. This book is full of action as the eccentric owners cook up crazy schemes to keep the home from being demolished.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Hilo Book 1: The Boy Who Crashed to Earth by Judd Winick

Cover image for Hilo. Book 1, The boy who crashed to EarthSuper powers? Check! Robots? Check? Aliens? Check! What else could you ask for in a graphic novel! The Hilo series has it all. D.J. and Gina find a mysterious boy, Hilo, who fell from the sky. Together the new friends help Hilo find out who he is and just what he might be capable of. Hilo will have to learn fast though since he wasn’t the only thing to fall to Earth! I loved reading about this modern boy super hero and the friendships he made.  Besides, who wouldn’t want to go to school with a super hero!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Stick Dog by Tom Watson

Cover image for Stick DogHere’s a great series for fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid or anyone that likes funny chapter books with some illustrations! Stick Dog and his four friends – Stripes, Mutt, Poo-Poo and Karen – scheme to get some delicious looking hamburgers from a family at the park. Distractions and obstacles abound. Will clever Stick Dog find a way to feast? Don’t forget to check out Stick Dog’s other hilarious adventures! Not a dog person? Don’t worry there’s also Stick Cat!

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

The Wild Robot by Peter Brown

Cover image for The wild robotIn The Wild Robot, readers are introduced to Roz, a robot who wakes up alone on a remote island. She was not built for the wilderness and at first finds it difficult to adapt to the wildness of the island. Slowly though she learns to survive by observing the other inhabitants and eventually making friends with the animals. Roz even adopts a gooseling and begins to raise him as her son.  Great for fans of animal stories and those looking to ponder some deeper questions about what feelings are and who has them. Stay tuned for a sequel, The Wild Robot Escapes, coming out in October.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

The Most Amazing Creature in the Sea by Brenda Z. Guiberson

Cover image for The most amazing creature in the seaWhale shark vs vampire squid! Nothing is more amazing then this book under or above the sea! Read it and debate with your friends which animal really is the most amazing creature in the sea. Maybe it’s the mimic octopus who is a master of disguise or the box jellyfish with deadly venom. You decide! Teachers and parents this would make a good read aloud if you are looking for short nonfiction or a conversation starter.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

Cover image for A blind guide to StinkvilleImagine moving across the country and leaving your best friend when your Dad gets a new job. Now imagine doing all of that with a depressed mom who barely gets out of bed and an older brother who barely speaks to you. Oh, you are also blind and have albinoism. Sound rough? Well, Alice handles it all like a champion and proves along the way the difference between having a vision and having sight.

Book reviewed by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian