Staff Picks 4 Kids Category: Picks by Erin E.

Wet Cement: A Mix of Concrete Poems by Bob Raczka

Cover image for Wet cement : a mix of concrete poemsIt takes great skill to say a lot without a lot of words and even more so to do that within the constraints of a specific format, like a haiku or other type of poem. Bob Raczka’s collection of 21 concrete poems presents fun, clever, and surprising poems that kids can relate to and be inspired by. Concrete poetry’s meaning is conveyed partly or wholly by visual means, using patterns of words or letters and other typographical devices. Down to the wordplay in the title, there is not a word wasted in this collection. If you enjoy this one, check out one of Bob Racka’s other poetry books—he has written several.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito

Cover image for The sound of silenceYoshio makes his way through the bustling city of Tokyo on his way to school, listening to all the different sounds. He asks a koto player if she has a favorite sound, and she replies that it is “the sound of ma, of silence.” So Yoshio starts looking for silence. Who knew it would be so difficult to find? Warm, rich illustrations show a variety of perspectives that you don’t always see in picture books, such as Yoshio’s family around the dinner table pictured from above. The illustrations will invite you into this book, and then you will be captivated by the story. It is a beautiful representation of daily life in another country as well as a gentle reminder for all of us to take time to pause in life. The Afterword includes an explanation of the Japanese concept of ma, or the silence between sounds.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

My Pen by Christopher Myers

Cover image for My penIn My Pen by Christopher Myers, a boy celebrates the power of imagination by creating images with the simplest of supplies. For example, his pen rides dinosaurs…has x-ray vision…and tells everyone that he loves them. The phrases and images are thought-provoking, moving, and beautifully drawn. This book will inspire the artist and the humanitarian in all of us. It asks kids, “What can your pen do?”

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Tell Me a Tattoo Story by Alison McGhee

Cover image for Tell me a tattoo storyThis portrait of a loving family moved me to tears- happy tears. I love that it shows a father covered in tattoos, which you don’t often (if ever) see in picture books, but will often see in real life. The story follows the son’s questions about each tattoo, which highlight important moments in the dad’s life, including his favorite book as a child, and the day he met a pretty girl (the boy’s mother). It also depicts “the longest trip [he] ever took” which gives deeper and perhaps surprising background about the father’s past. This would make a great gift for all the tattooed dads out there, but I think other families will see themselves in this book as well.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Supertruck by Stephen Savage

Cover image for SupertruckBy day, he just collects the trash. But when the city is hit by a colossal snowstorm, this superhero on wheels will save the day. Toddler truck-fans will eat this up. The bold, clean graphics and simple story line make this an ideal choice for storytime. Though I would be sure to point out to children that collecting trash is actually a very important job!

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Bernice Gets Carried Away by Hannah E. Harrison

Cover image for Bernice gets carried awayIn Bernice Gets Carried Away by Hannah E. Harrison, Bernice the cat is at a birthday party where all of her animal friends seem to be enjoying themselves, but she certainly is not. She is in a mood. And Bernice is quite committed to her horrible mood, that is until she gets carried away… literally…by a bunch of balloons. From way up in the sky she gets a little perspective on things. What I love about this book are the emotions on the animals’ faces and how the dark clouds lift along with Bernice’s mood. The effect of how bright the pictures get is amazing. The message is a reminder that children and adults alike can use from time to time.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Archie the Daredevil Penguin by Andy Rash

Cover image for Archie the daredevil penguinArchie is a so-called “daredevil” because he has invented all kinds of crazy ways to get from one iceberg to another, including a slingshot, a rocket, and even Flap-o-matic wings. Little do his friends know that he’s just terrified of the water and the strange creatures who lurk in the briny deep! This is one of those gems of a picture book that will have adults laughing out loud just as much as their kids, and there’s still a great story arc with a positive message.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

If You Plant a Seed by Kadir Nelson

Cover image for If you plant a seedKadir Nelson’s art is just brilliant. In his latest picture book, If You Plant a Seed, the pictures are so vibrant and colorful that they jump off of the page. Nelson has written a tale about planting seeds with a double meaning. The pictures show the literal planting and harvesting of vegetables, while the text talks about planting seeds of kindness rather than selfishness. There’s no question about the message here, and there is much to enjoy in the faces and gestures of these charming animals.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Chasing Secrets by Gennifer Choldenko

Cover image for Chasing secretsIn Chasing Secrets by Gennifer Choldenko, Lizzie’s father is a doctor and one of her favorite things to do is visit patients with him, even though that’s not something girls really do in 1900. She discovers a hidden dark side of the city of San Francisco where she lives, including rumors that the plague is there. Then the family’s Chinese cook goes missing just when Chinatown is quarantined, and Lizzie is determined to find him—he is part of her family after all. Ignoring the rules of race and class, Lizzie must put the pieces together in a heart-stopping race to save the people she loves. This book brought to life a time and place in America’s history that children may not know much about.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator

Kate & Pippin by Martin Springett

Cover image for Kate & Pippin : an unlikely love storyWho doesn’t love a good unlikely animal friends story? Kate & Pippin by Martin Springett is a true story, complete with adorable photographs! Kate is a Great Dane. When a fawn who has been abandoned by her mother wanders onto Kate’s farm, she cares for her. Though Pippin can’t stay with Kate forever, they will always have a bond. This early reader nonfiction is perfect for 1st graders.

Book reviewed by Erin E., Youth Services Programming Coordinator