Staff Picks 4 Kids

Staff Picks 4 Kids Blog

Beauty and the Beak: How Science, Technology, and a 3D-Printed Beak Rescued A Bald Eagle by Deborah Lee Rose

Beauty and the Beak: How Science, Technology, and a 3D-Printed Beak Rescued A Bald EagleBeauty is an amazing bald eagle and was born in the wild. She learned to fly, hunt and use her beak to break up food, and live on her own. However, one day that all changed when she was hurt by a bullet. It took most of her upper beak and hurt her face as well. Without her beak, she couldn’t hunt anymore or take care of herself. Luckily, a policeman found her and brought her to a wildlife center where they helped her heal. However, she was still missing her beak and that is when an engineer became interested in helping Beauty. Could they 3D print a beak for her to wear? Would it work the same way her original beak worked? It had never been done before, but maybe this was a way to help Beauty. In this incredible true story, learn how using a 3D printer helped Beauty.

Book reviewed by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood

Lifeboat 12No one can know the difference that is made by making one choice instead of another. Rarely, though, do our decisions mean the difference between life and death.

It did for Ken.

It was 1940 and WW II was at its peak. Britain prepared for the invasion they were expecting from Hitler and his armies. The decision was made to send as many British children as possible to other British dominions like Canada and New Zealand, where they would be safe from the bombing or an invasion by troops. Not every child could go, so a lottery was set up, and names drawn got to go by ship to a new, temporary home in Canada.

And Ken won the lottery! He was especially excited because the children would be sailing overseas in a luxury liner! Everything was as fantastic as he had expected – until the liner was hit by a German torpedo! Little did he realize that his choice of a lifeboat was going to be critical to his survival. (Based on a true experience)

Book reviewed by Loreen S., Youth Services Assistant

How to Feed Your Parents by Ryan Miller

How to feed your parents / by Ryan Miller ; illustrated by Hatem AlyMatilda Macaroni’s food fussy parents will only eat six things that are either take-out, frozen, or prepackaged.  After tasting Grandma Macaroni’s jambalaya, Matilda is willing to sample sushi and pork paprikash.  Matilda’s newly opened palate will no longer allow her to eat only nuggets and noodles at home. With the help of grandma, she begins to learn the art of cooking and kitchen safety.

The big twist to this story comes with Matilda’s ability to teach her parents to eat healthier and with more variety in their diet.  This is a fun read-a-loud that will be enjoyed by all.  Be sure not to miss the recipe on the back cover.

Book reviewed by Marsha D., Youth Library Assistant

Paul Writes a Letter by Chris Raschka

Paul Writes A Letter book coverIn Paul Writes a Letter, Raschka gives us a lovely introduction to St. Paul and his epistles. Paul was a faithful and educated man who in the middle of his life began to believe in the story and teaching of Jesus. He traveled all throughout the Roman Empire to speak of his new way of thinking. While he traveled, he wrote letters to the people he had seen or would see soon.  Paul writes letters about hope and faith and about caring for others.  Each of the fourteen epistles attributed to Paul are featured with its own colorful, double page spread.  Caldecott Medalist Chris Raschka’s new picture book is full of humanity and kindness.

Book reviewed by Amy S., Youth Outreach and Programming Assistant

The Boo Boos that Changed the World by Barry Wittensteen

The boo-boos that changed the world : a true story about an accidental invention (really!) / Barry Wittenstein ; illustrated by Chris HsuEarle married his beloved wife Josephine who happened to be quite accident-prone…especially in the kitchen. Whether it was slicing onions, grating cheese, or lifting hot pots off the stove, Josephine was constantly grabbing towels to stop the bleeding. But you can’t cook with a towel wrapped around your hand! Leave it to her husband to create something out of adhesive tape and sterile gauze which was small enough for her to use herself. Earle brought the idea to his boss, James Johnson, who decided to produce and sell the product. Combining the word “bandage” with “first aid,” they came up with Band-Aid. After giving them to boy scouts and WW II troops, they were a hit! Add multiple sizes, colors and designs…and you have a worldwide success.

Here’s an awesome, quick-read, nonfiction book that came about “quite by accident”

Book reviewed by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison