Month: January 2019

News from the Research Desk Blog

National Hobby Month

January is National Hobby Month. There is no better time like the new year to pick up a brand new hobby or rediscover an old one! Having a hobby has been shown to decrease stress, and increase happiness and focus.

Stop by the library to pick up books and DVDs on the hobbies that interest you!

   

 

Categories:

Getting Help with the House

Owning a home is a worthwhile but often challenging experience.  Issues surrounding purchasing, financing and maintaining a home are complex.  Area homeowners or prospective homeowners can get guidance from the Northwest Housing Partnership.  On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 9:30 am at the Mount Prospect Public Library the Partnership will offer a series of presentations on homeownership. Six professionals in the areas of law, finance, and real estate will share guidelines and pathways for buying and maintaining a home. Information about the various programs offered by the Partnership, such as the Handyman Program, will also be provided. Each professional will also be available to answer questions. Come and learn about resources for home buying and home maintenance guidance that are available nearby.  You can register here for the program.

Start 2019 with a Free Credit Freeze

Security freezes, also known as credit freezes, restrict access to your credit file, making it harder for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name.

As of Sept. 21, 2018, you can freeze and unfreeze your credit file for free. You also can get a free freeze for your children who are under 16. And if you are someone’s guardian, conservator or have a valid power of attorney, you can get a free freeze for that person, too.

How will these freezes work? You should contact all three of the nationwide credit reporting agencies—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. If you request a freeze online or by phone, the agency must place the freeze within one business day. If you request a lift of the freeze, the agency must lift it within one hour. If you make your request by mail, the agency must place or lift the freeze within three business days after it gets their request. The freeze can be lifted temporarily without a fee.

Don’t confuse freezes with locks. They work in a similar way, but locks may have monthly fees. If you want a free freeze guaranteed by federal law, then you should opt for a freeze, not a lock. Learn more about credit freezes and other Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection resources here.

Categories: