Notes from Story Time Category: Vocabulary

Singalong Stories

monstersSinging helps children learn to follow directions. It is also a good way to learn new vocabulary because singing slows down the words, which makes them easier for your child to understand.  Try singing along to this fun, monster themed story If You’re a Monster and You Know It by Rebecca Emberley.

–Tip by Mary Smith, Head of Youth Services

 

Nonfiction Fun

Alligator or Crocodile?Nonfiction (or true) books are a great way to introduce unfamiliar words to children, thus increasing their vocabulary. These books often use different words than picture books. There are nonfiction books on hundreds of topics and at varying reading levels, so let your child choose a few that interest her and will keep her excited about books. Even just looking at the pictures and talking about what you see will benefit your child’s growing vocabulary. Ask a Youth staff member to help find nonfiction books the next time you’re at the Library!
–Tip by Dana F., Youth Services Assistant Department Head

Learning New Words

Quick as a CricketYou can use books to help expand your child’s vocabulary. Quick as a Cricket by Audrey Wood has many descriptive words that your child may not have heard before. You can help your child understand the meaning by looking at the pictures as well as the word’s opposite. You don’t need to stop to explain all of the words, but you may discuss a few of them as you read by giving examples of similar words or studying the pictures for clues about the word’s meaning.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

Dragon’s Extraordinary Egg by Debi Gliori

Dragon's Extraordinary EggOne way to build vocabulary is to introduce new words prior to reading a book with those words. It can be as simple as saying the word and explaining what it means before opening the book. This is a great way to increase your child’s vocabulary since children are more likely to remember certain words if they are used, heard, and spoken more than once. Before reading this book, talk about the title and what the word “extraordinary” means.

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant