Notes from Story Time Category: Vocabulary

Read It Again!

Has your child found a favorite book that you feel like you are reading over and over again? Keep reading! There is value to be found even in repeated sharing of a book– exposure to familiar words helps to build vocabulary.

Talking Builds Vocabulary

Talking with your child, especially as you share books, is one of the best ways to develop vocabulary.  In Penguin Problems, there is a penguin who is very frustrated. Many books give you the opportunity to talk with your child about different feelings. Have them explain how they feel and what they think the character is feeling.

Make-Believe Play

One type of play is make-believe play. When children are engaging in imaginative play, ask them to tell you about what they are doing. This will help them practice telling stories, which builds narrative and vocabulary skills. When you have a conversation with them and add to their stories, you are enhancing those skills.

Let’s Play Make-Believe

princess-super-kittyWho likes to play pretend? One benefit of playing make-believe at home (besides being so fun) is that it encourages vocabulary and narrative skills, which are important pre-reading skills. The cool characters and settings that we see in picture books like Princess Super Kitty by Antoinette Porter by can inspire new ideas for playtime.

 

Cows in the Kitchen, Oh My!

cowsRepetition helps children remember words and increase their vocabulary. This is an important pre-reading skill. The catchy repetitive phrases in Cows in the Kitchen by June Crebbin make reading aloud this title a fun way to increase your child’s vocabulary.