Notes from Story Time Category: Talking

What’s Happening in This Story?

That's (Not) Mine by Anna KangAs you read That’s (Not) Mine by Anna Kang, talk to your child about what is happening in the illustrations. By talking about what is happening, children learn that there is a beginning, middle, and end in a story.

A Hippo in Our Yard

Talking with children develops their early literacy skills by helping them learn letters, word sounds, and new vocabulary.  Making predictions and talking with children about what they think will happen helps them invest in the story. As you read A Hippo in Our Yard, see if your child can predict what Sally will do on each page!

What Does This Mean?

Reading and talking with your child helps build vocabulary by introducing new words. When you read a book to your child, it’s okay to stop briefly to point out a new word and what it means.

Your Baby Needs to Hear Your Voice

Talking with your baby is so important – your baby needs to hear the sounds of your language! Until about six months of age your baby is a “universal linguist,” meaning he/she can distinguish among each of the 150 sounds of human speech. By 12 months, babies recognize the speech sounds only of the languages they hear from people who talk and play with them.

Read to Me

 Make reading fun by engaging your child in the story by reading lift-the-flap books, singing as you read, or talking to your baby about things they see in the pictures.  It’s more important that reading to your child is enjoyable rather than long. Follow your child’s mood.