Notes from Story Time Category: Talking

Fables

The Lion and the MouseFables and other traditional stories are great to read with your child, and you can tell them in different ways. As you read the wordless picture book The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney, you might want to use the text of the story from the Library of Congress’ free database at www.read.gov/aesop/007. This shows that words of one version of the story work with the illustrations from another version and that words and pictures have meaning.

Jumping and Learning

Girl jumping ropeJust remember, getting your child ready to read is as simple as “talk, sing, read, write, and play.” Have fun by singing a jump rope rhyme! You don’t need a rope; you can just have fun jumping!

Ice cream soda,
Lemonade punch.
What kind of food
Will I have for lunch?
A, B, C, D, E…

The letter you stop jumping on is the first letter of your lunch food! Talk about what kinds of food start with that letter, and what food your child likes.

What’s Happening in This Story?

That's (Not) Mine by Anna KangAs you read That’s (Not) Mine by Anna Kang, talk to your child about what is happening in the illustrations. By talking about what is happening, children learn that there is a beginning, middle, and end in a story.

A Hippo in Our Yard

Talking with children develops their early literacy skills by helping them learn letters, word sounds, and new vocabulary.  Making predictions and talking with children about what they think will happen helps them invest in the story. As you read A Hippo in Our Yard, see if your child can predict what Sally will do on each page!

What Does This Mean?

Reading and talking with your child helps build vocabulary by introducing new words. When you read a book to your child, it’s okay to stop briefly to point out a new word and what it means.