Notes from Story Time Category: Singing

Put Your “T” in the Air

Before children can identify the differences between letters, children first need to identify differences between shapes.  When reading at home, be on the lookout for letters with “special” shapes, like the letters in children’s names. Hunt for curvy lines, straight lines, or even

circles!

As a fun activity, you might want to try singing the following rhyme with the letter “T” with your child. Trace the letter with your finger. See how it has two straight lines?

 

 

Put Your “T” in the Air  (to tune of “Put Your Finger in the Air”)

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, and let’s hold it out to there.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Other Verses:  “on your knee….and jump along with me”

                          “behind your back….and let’s pretend to eat a snack”

                       “on your nose…and then onto your toes”

 

Down on the Farm

When children are learning how to read, it’s important for them to realize that words have parts. Singing is a wonderful way to slow down the sounds in words so children can hear and repeat them. Practice singing the repeating line “Down on the farm, down on the farm” with your child before you start reading Down on the Farm by Merrily Kutner. Repetition helps children learn about sounds and syllables in preparation for reading on their own.

Sing Your Favorites With Your Baby

Did you know there are many picture books in the Youth collection that feature familiar rhymes and songs that you can sing as you read? Think of a favorite one and ask for it at the Youth Services desk! We may have it available. Youth staff can also recommend other great titles for you to take home and enjoy together.

Rhyming Stories Build Memory

Singing is a fun and easy way to help children build language.  Rhyming stories and songs can enhance the brain’s memory capabilities. In Winter Is for Snow, the rhyming text has a pattern.  See if your child can recognize the rhyme and repeat the  pattern after a page or two!

Wiggle Your Fingers

Language is in itself musical. When you sing and speak, your baby learns about words, language, and communication. Through your singing, baby’s language comprehension begins.

Your baby wiggling his fingers might seem like a trivial thing, but he’s actually gaining more control over his muscles. “Where is Thumbkin” is a classic tune that focuses on one finger at a time.