Notes from Story Time Category: Singing

Down on the Farm

When children are learning how to read, it’s important for them to realize that words have parts. Singing is a wonderful way to slow down the sounds in words so children can hear and repeat them. Practice singing the repeating line “Down on the farm, down on the farm” with your child before you start reading Down on the Farm by Merrily Kutner. Repetition helps children learn about sounds and syllables in preparation for reading on their own.

Sing Your Favorites With Your Baby

Did you know there are many picture books in the Youth collection that feature familiar rhymes and songs that you can sing as you read? Think of a favorite one and ask for it at the Youth Services desk! We may have it available. Youth staff can also recommend other great titles for you to take home and enjoy together.

Rhyming Stories Build Memory

Singing is a fun and easy way to help children build language.  Rhyming stories and songs can enhance the brain’s memory capabilities. In Winter Is for Snow, the rhyming text has a pattern.  See if your child can recognize the rhyme and repeat the  pattern after a page or two!

Wiggle Your Fingers

Language is in itself musical. When you sing and speak, your baby learns about words, language, and communication. Through your singing, baby’s language comprehension begins.

Your baby wiggling his fingers might seem like a trivial thing, but he’s actually gaining more control over his muscles. “Where is Thumbkin” is a classic tune that focuses on one finger at a time.

 

Wheels on the Bus

Talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing are five simple practices that will help your child get ready to read! Driving in the car is a great time to sing to your baby. Try singing Wheels on the Bus as you drive—you can make up new or different verses each time. Your baby will just like to hear the sound of your voice.

Giraffes Can’t Dance

Singing is one way to help your child be ready to read. Children don’t care if you can’t carry a tune! Singing breaks down words into smaller parts and helps children hear the sounds that make up words. Singing can also help some children remember things better than just spoken word.

Stories and songs go great together! Try reading Giraffes Can’t Dance.  Then make up a silly song about it.  .

 

It’s Puppet Time

Use stuffed animals or puppets to sing songs, read stories, or talk to your baby. Even siblings can help with this fun activity!  No puppets at home? Ask about our collection of puppets that can be checked out!

Let’s Get Moving and Grooving

With summer here, take this opportunity to check out some CDs to play in the car or at home and sing along. This is a great way to develop language skills for reading while having fun moving and grooving.

Elephants Cannot Dance!

Using puppets to talk or sing is a great way to encourage creativity and imagination. Take a favorite book (such as Elephants Cannot Dance) or favorite song and set it up with puppets to recreate favorite character, plot, or melodies.

Ping! Bang! Tap!

Helping your child understand that words have a rhythm and can be broken down into syllables will help your child later when he/she is sounding out words while learning to read.  As you read Roadwork by Sally Sutton with your child, clap along to the sound words such as “Ping! Bang! Tap!”