Notes from Story Time Category: Playing

Take Me Out to the Ballgame

Playing matching games helps children see what is alike and different in objects and letters. Take Me Out to the Yakyu by Aaron Meshon shows the differences in baseball in two cultures. As you read this book, talk about the differences in each picture. This will help your child learn new vocabulary as well as that the world is multicultural.

Let’s Make Pretend Cake

Many stories offer a chance for you to play with the concepts in the book. In A Birthday for Cow by Jan Thomas, the animals make a cake. Incorporating props such as a mixing bowl and spoon into the reading of the story, or retelling the story afterwards will help children understand the story better, and have fun at the same time.

Playtime

Allow your child time for free play. Provide a variety of toys and objects that are safe for babies, and let them direct how they want to play with the object. Even if it just looks like they are putting a toy in their mouth or knocking things over, they are learning!

Make-Believe Play

One type of play is make-believe play. When children are engaging in imaginative play, ask them to tell you about what they are doing. This will help them practice telling stories, which builds narrative and vocabulary skills. When you have a conversation with them and add to their stories, you are enhancing those skills.

Five Pets in the Window

From birth, babies play to learn about their world. Not only is playing with your baby a good bonding experience, but it is also one of the best ways for babies to learn language and literacy skills and build motor skills.

There are many fun counting rhymes.  Play a game with your baby’s stuffed animals by lining them up in a row. Take one animal away each time you say the rhyme.

 

Five Pets in the Window

Five pets in the window for the whole world to see.

Look, someone is coming, who says,

“You’re the perfect pet for me.