Notes from Story Time Category: Playing

We’re Going on Safari

Books are an easy way to introduce your child to so many fun things such as taking a safari without ever leaving your home. First, read one or all of these titles: Yikes by Robert Florczak, Way Far Away on a Wild Safari by Jan Peck, and Starry Safari by Linda Ashman. Then encourage your child to do some of the activities they contain. Bake some animals cookies. If you don’t have fancy cookie cutters, your children can make their own shapes. Then have your children create their own wildlife park using their toys and stuffed animals. To top off the fun, learn about real animals by using your Mount Prospect Library card to log into PebbleGo to watch videos, listen to animal noises, and learn fun facts.

It Looks Like Spilt Milk

When selecting It Looks Like Spilt Milk to share during storytime, I was reminded how easy, but important it is to play simple, imaginative games with your children. Imaginative play helps children work out their own ideas, thoughts, and feelings. Try going outside and looking at the clouds with your children. Ask them what they see in the cloud shapes? You will be inspired by their creativity and ingenuity.

It Looks Like Spilt Milk book cover

Craft-Kits-to-Go

Is your child looking for something to do? Are you missing the craft programs at the library. Then request a craft-kit-to-go by emailing youthserv@mppl.org, calling 847-253-5675, or via LiveChat at www.mppl.org. Kits can be picked up in the Library or by using Parking Lot Pickup.

craft kit--paper houses

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Have You Seen My Cat?

Children learn more from stories when they interact with them. After listening to this story, see if your child can do a “search and find” in your house. If you don’t have a cat, you can always hide a stuffed animal or other item for them to find.

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Make a Rhyming Box

Did you know that rhyming is one indication of how easily a child will learn to read? Rhyming helps children recognize shared letter sequences, such as –at in cat, rat, and bat, which will help children sound out words when they begin to read. Most children love hearing rhymes and participating in rhyming activities. Here is a simple one you can do at home. Have your child decorate an old box. Hide some easily rhymable objects inside, such as a dog or hat. Have your child reach inside the box and pull out an object. See how many words they can think of that rhyme with that object.

child playing