Notes from Story Time Category: Phonological Awareness

Nursery Rhyme Time

This bookCat & Mouse uses three traditional nursery rhymes and has fun with them. Nursery rhymes are fun to sing and say with your children. Even if children do not understand the meaning of all the words in the rhymes, hearing them is helping children develop phonological awareness, or the ability to play with parts of words.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

Moo, Baa, La, La, La

Noisy words are Moo, Baa, La, La, Laa fun way to build phonological awareness, or being able to hear different sounds in words. Teaching children that the cow says “moo,” the pig says “oink,” and so on not only teaches your child about animals, but also about sounds that words can make. This will help them later when they are learning to read.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

Wiggle Waggle

Wiggle WagglePhonological awareness involves being able to break words down into parts. In Wiggle Waggle by Jonathan London, you’ll have fun with onomatopoeia—the name for words (many times silly ones) that sound like what they describe—like CLOMP or BOING! You may stretch the sounds in some of these words, or say them quickly!

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

What Rhymes With “Snow?”

Snow

Take advantage of every opportunity to rhyme with your children even if the book does not have rhyming text. Pick out a word and brainstorm some rhyming words together. For instance, this book by Manya Stojic has just one word for a title: Snow. Can you think of some words that rhyme with “snow?”

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

Froodle Sproodle

FroodleDo you ever make up nonsense words? The book Froodle by Antoinette Portis has tons of them! After you read the bird’s silly words in the story, play a game to make up some of your own! Phonological awareness involves understanding that words are made up of smaller sounds. When they have this skill, children are able to think about how words sound, separate from what they mean.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

There’s a Spider on the Floor, on the Floor…

Raffi's Top 10 Songs to ReadFind time to sing with your children this week. You may not realize it, but singing songs helps children hear words broken down into parts. This builds phonological awareness, which helps them later on when they have to sound out words.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

Nursery Rhymes

This Little PiggyRhymes are a fun way to build phonological awareness, the ability to hear the small sounds in words. Pick a favorite nursery rhyme such as “This Little Piggy” to share with your child.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

 

Snow Poems

It's Snowing! It's Snowing!The early literacy skill of phonological awareness focuses on having your child play with and have exposure to the small parts in words, as well as hearing the beginning sounds in words. Bring this skill to life by reading It’s Snowing! It’s Snowing!: Winter Poems by Jack Prelutsky. The short poems feature silly word pairings and fun imagery that will allow you and your child to play with words.

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

 

Stories in Rhyme

Duck in the Truck by Jez AlboroughDuck in a Truck by Jez Alborough is a great book for phonological awareness because it contains rhymes throughout the story. Rhyming is one way children can hear parts of words. While you share the book, ask your child to guess what the rhymes are. By turning this into a game, you are making learning phonological awareness fun!

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

Peek-a-Moo!

Peek-a-pet!Making animal sounds is so much fun! In the book Peek-a-Pet! by Marie Torres Cimarusti, children will have fun guessing the animal, opening the flap, and making the animal sounds. Animal sounds are a great way to develop phonological awareness skills that will help children sound out words when they are learning to read.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison