Notes from Story Time Category: Phonological Awareness

Ping! Bang! Tap!

Helping your child understand that words have a rhythm and can be broken down into syllables will help your child later when he/she is sounding out words while learning to read.  As you read Roadwork by Sally Sutton with your child, clap along to the sound words such as “Ping! Bang! Tap!”

Nursery Rhyme Time

This bookCat & Mouse uses three traditional nursery rhymes and has fun with them. Nursery rhymes are fun to sing and say with your children. Even if children do not understand the meaning of all the words in the rhymes, hearing them is helping children develop phonological awareness, or the ability to play with parts of words.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

Moo, Baa, La, La, La

Noisy words are Moo, Baa, La, La, Laa fun way to build phonological awareness, or being able to hear different sounds in words. Teaching children that the cow says “moo,” the pig says “oink,” and so on not only teaches your child about animals, but also about sounds that words can make. This will help them later when they are learning to read.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

Wiggle Waggle

Wiggle WagglePhonological awareness involves being able to break words down into parts. In Wiggle Waggle by Jonathan London, you’ll have fun with onomatopoeia—the name for words (many times silly ones) that sound like what they describe—like CLOMP or BOING! You may stretch the sounds in some of these words, or say them quickly!

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

What Rhymes With “Snow?”

Snow

Take advantage of every opportunity to rhyme with your children even if the book does not have rhyming text. Pick out a word and brainstorm some rhyming words together. For instance, this book by Manya Stojic has just one word for a title: Snow. Can you think of some words that rhyme with “snow?”

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant