Notes from Story Time Category: Narrative

Monster Talk

Monster, be Good!As you read Monster, Be Good! by Natalie Marshall, have your child tell the monster the phrase after you read it. Then when you are done, ask some questions like, “What would you say if someone gave you a present?” or “What do you say if you accidentally bump into someone?” When you ask your child questions, give them extra time to think and to answer you. Talking back and forth uses different parts of the brain, so it takes time for children to form their responses. This is a fun way to learn manners and narrative skills!

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Too Tall Houses by Gianna Marino

Too Tall HousesIn this story, Rabbit and Owl have a problem. Let’s find out what the problem is and if they are able to solve it.

Children enjoy talking about what they have read. It is a good way to engage them in conversation and for them to remember the story they have read. Ask your child questions before, during, and after reading. The ability to retell a story is an important skill to learn before going to school.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

Tweet! Tweet!

BirdsPractice telling and retelling stories. Try looking at some of the birds outside and talk with your child about what they are doing and what they look like. Then try making up stories about the birds in your neighborhood. This will help your child later to talk about what is happening in books.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist