Notes from Story Time Category: Letter Knowledge

Put Your “T” in the Air

Before children can identify the differences between letters, children first need to identify differences between shapes.  When reading at home, be on the lookout for letters with “special” shapes, like the letters in children’s names. Hunt for curvy lines, straight lines, or even

circles!

As a fun activity, you might want to try singing the following rhyme with the letter “T” with your child. Trace the letter with your finger. See how it has two straight lines?

 

 

Put Your “T” in the Air  (to tune of “Put Your Finger in the Air”)

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, and let’s hold it out to there.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Other Verses:  “on your knee….and jump along with me”

                          “behind your back….and let’s pretend to eat a snack”

                       “on your nose…and then onto your toes”

 

Letters and Shapes

WednesdayThe book Wednesday by Anne Bertier takes two basic shapes—a circle and a square—and shows how they can be moved around and divided to form other shapes and pictures. Playing with shapes is one way to help your child become better at identifying key differences in the way letters look.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

B is for Bed and Bear

A Bed for BearUse books about things children are familiar with to increase their letter knowledge. If they are interested in the word or have a connection to it they will remember it more easily. In the book A Bed for Bear by Clive McFarland, point to the letter “B” and say its name and sound. Then let your child know that the letter “B” is the first letter in the words “bed” and “bear.” You can even help your child make the letter in the air with his or her finger. By focusing on one letter during your book sharing, you will help to increase your child’s knowledge about letters.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

Shape Up!

ShapesYoung children learn through their senses, and they learn best by doing. When children are learning to read, it is helpful to recognize letters and be able to tell the difference between them. Younger children will start by learning the difference between shapes. One way to help children do this is by moving their arms and bodies into shapes and letters. While doing this, you can also talk about the differences between shapes, or sounds, in the case of letters.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

Alphabet Box Game

Alphabet Box GameMaking learning about the alphabet fun. Play this fun alphabet game with your child. Find a shoe box, mark it with a letter of the alphabet, and search with your child to find objects that begin with that letter to put inside the box.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head