Notes from Story Time Category: Digital Literacy

Rabbit Magic

If you want to see a real magic trick after reading Rabbit Magic, go online with your child and watch videos on YouTube. This is called joint media engagement, when people use technology together. According to research, children learn faster if engaged with technology in a social setting than when they engage with technology by themselves.

Jump for Jazz

Digital literacy is the ability to understand, evaluate, and use information when it is presented by a computer, tablet, or other digital media. With so much technology present in our daily lives, we want to provide information to help you navigate the world of technology with your child.

If your child just loves music, check out the Channel 11 www.pbs.org website. On their music games page at http://pbskids.org/games/music/, you’ll find over a dozen music-themed child-appropriate online games.  You can connect this experience to books by checking out a fun music title such as Jazzmatazz.  There are also fun, education apps you can download or use at the library such as Jazzy Day.

Tech Time Totes

The Library now has Tech Time Totes available to check out. Each contains books, a technology toy, and activities for your child. There are also all kinds of tips for adults on ways to model technology for children.

Print and Technology Work Together

Experts recommend parents be very involved in their child’s experience with electronic devices, especially at a young age. Print books and technology can work together to enhance your child’s overall learning experience.

As you read a book with your child, use your  index (pointer) fingers to trace the shapes (in the book, on the floor, on child’s back, etc.). Fine motor control helps children when using technology such as a tablet. Children may begin by using both hands and all of their fingers, and then transition to using just one finger to push, swipe, and move things on the screen.

Have You Seen a Sloth?

This week our focus is on digital literacy and ways you can use technology to enhance reading or book-sharing time. Sometimes in books you’ll come across animals (such as ones in Slowly, Slowy, Slowly Said the Sloth) that are new to your child—and maybe to you, too. Go to a zoo’s website and see if the animal lives there or search for videos on YouTube. Turn on the volume and see what noises those animals make. Your child will get to see actual photos or videos of these animals in addition to the illustrated ones in the book. Using the internet in this way is great for expanding your child’s curiosity and vocabulary.