Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Ring, Ring, Hello, It’s a Banana

bananaPlay offers so many enjoyable opportunities to develop language. It helps children learn to think symbolically, like when they use a banana as a phone. This kind of thinking is used in language all the time and will help as they are learning to read!

Singing Promotes Listening Skills

mom singing with childSinging with your child is a great bonding experience that promotes listening skills and fosters language acquisition. Next time your child isn’t paying attention, try singing rather than saying your instructions.  You might be surprised by their response.

Reading, Writing, and Wrapping Paper

Writing and reading development support one another.  As children become aware of print, they begin to understand that the print is what you are reading—not the pictures. They start to see print everywhere in their world and to understand that it represents meaning and the spoken word.  It is also important to have your child practice scribbling even before they know how to form letters.

Try this fun activity at home to help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.  After you read a birthday book such as I Got a Chicken for My Birthday, give your child a piece of wrapping paper for your child to wrinkle, tear, bend, and fold. These motions will help strengthen the muscles in your child’s hands and get them ready for writing.

Rhyming With Dr. Seuss

Hearing sounds in words through singing and rhyming prepares children to read.  Books that rhyme help children to hear the sounds as they listen for the rhyming pattern. Dr. Seuss books are known for their fun rhyming schemes.

Bits and Blocks

Using the rhyme below with your child, pretend your hands are blocks. This symbolic play promotes your child’s creativity.  It also teaches them that one object can represent another object in the same way that print words stand for real objects.

 

 

 

I take my little wooden blocks  (make fist)

And stack them one by one.  (place fists over and over on top of each other)

I stack them higher, higher  (raise fists, still stacking)

And when my task is done, I’ve made some big tall buildings  (arms over head)

Just like they have downtown. I give a push.  (jab forward with index finger)

They start to sway…   (arms raised, sway body back and forth)

CRASH!  (clap hands)

They all fall down! (arms fall to sides, or children fall to floor)