Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Supertruck!

Supertruck by Stephen SavageEven before children can write themselves, learning about the written word helps them see that they are many ways to communicate information. Supertruck by Stephen Savage does not have a lot of text on each page. However, the text is displayed in neat block lettering, which is great for children learning letters. Having children trace the words with their finger will help them understand the shapes that form letters and words.

Talk, Talk, Talk

child playingTalking is one practice that will help children when learning to read, and you can do it anytime! When you’re on a walk, look around and have children describe what they see. When playing with your children, ask them questions about what they are doing. At bedtime have them remember and tell you about their day. By encouraging them to tell you what they experience, you are helping them get ready for reading.

Digital Literacy

child using tabletDigital literacy is the ability to understand, evaluate, and use information when it is presented by a computer, tablet, or other digital media.  On YouTube, many familiar children’s performers have channels that they post videos on. If you are concerned about inappropriate ads or comments, try playing the video through www.viewpure.com, which is a free website that gets rid of comments and removes the unrelated videos at the end of the clip.

Emotional Intelligence


Three Grumpy Trucks
Through play, kids can learn about emotional intelligence, or how to process their feelings and share them in constructive ways. Books like Three Grumpy Trucks by Todd Tarpley can start a conversation about the best way to play and express oneself.

Fables

The Lion and the MouseFables and other traditional stories are great to read with your child, and you can tell them in different ways. As you read the wordless picture book The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney, you might want to use the text of the story from the Library of Congress’ free database at www.read.gov/aesop/007. This shows that words of one version of the story work with the illustrations from another version and that words and pictures have meaning.