Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Nonfiction Fun

Alligator or Crocodile?Nonfiction (or true) books are a great way to introduce unfamiliar words to children, thus increasing their vocabulary. These books often use different words than picture books. There are nonfiction books on hundreds of topics and at varying reading levels, so let your child choose a few that interest her and will keep her excited about books. Even just looking at the pictures and talking about what you see will benefit your child’s growing vocabulary. Ask a Youth staff member to help find nonfiction books the next time you’re at the Library!
–Tip by Dana F., Youth Services Assistant Department Head

Spots in a Box

Spots in a BoxIn Spots in a Box by Helen Ward writing is important to the story. Be sure to point out the writing as you read it to emphasize that you are reading the text, not the pictures. This helps your child gain print awareness, one of the early literacy skills that will help your child learn to read later on.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Moo, Baa, La, La, La

Noisy words are Moo, Baa, La, La, Laa fun way to build phonological awareness, or being able to hear different sounds in words. Teaching children that the cow says “moo,” the pig says “oink,” and so on not only teaches your child about animals, but also about sounds that words can make. This will help them later when they are learning to read.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

The Seals on the Bus

The Seals on the BusThe hilarious picture book The Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort repeats a lot of the same words. Stories and songs with repeating parts allow your child to more easily retell the things that happened in them, which increases narrative skills. In this book, we see different animals go onto the bus. After reading this book, can you tell why the LAST animal on the bus causes everyone to get off?

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

Repeat After Me

Print motivation is the enjoyment of books and reading. The book Night, Circus by Mark Corcoran repeats the phrase, “’Night,” so that the narrator can say goodnight to every member of the circus. While reading this book, have your child say “’Night” to all the members of the circus. This will help your child stay involved in the book and is a way to support print motivation.
–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian