Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Talk About the Pictures

OrangutankaThis book has fantastic illustrations that contribute to the words in the book. As you read, talk about what is going on in the pictures and give your child time to respond back to you. By having this discussion and interaction with the book, you are helping your child increase vocabulary and narrative skills.
–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

Letters and Shapes

WednesdayThe book Wednesday by Anne Bertier takes two basic shapes—a circle and a square—and shows how they can be moved around and divided to form other shapes and pictures. Playing with shapes is one way to help your child become better at identifying key differences in the way letters look.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

Nonfiction Fun

Alligator or Crocodile?Nonfiction (or true) books are a great way to introduce unfamiliar words to children, thus increasing their vocabulary. These books often use different words than picture books. There are nonfiction books on hundreds of topics and at varying reading levels, so let your child choose a few that interest her and will keep her excited about books. Even just looking at the pictures and talking about what you see will benefit your child’s growing vocabulary. Ask a Youth staff member to help find nonfiction books the next time you’re at the Library!
–Tip by Dana F., Youth Services Assistant Department Head

Spots in a Box

Spots in a BoxIn Spots in a Box by Helen Ward writing is important to the story. Be sure to point out the writing as you read it to emphasize that you are reading the text, not the pictures. This helps your child gain print awareness, one of the early literacy skills that will help your child learn to read later on.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

Moo, Baa, La, La, La

Noisy words are Moo, Baa, La, La, Laa fun way to build phonological awareness, or being able to hear different sounds in words. Teaching children that the cow says “moo,” the pig says “oink,” and so on not only teaches your child about animals, but also about sounds that words can make. This will help them later when they are learning to read.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison