Month: May 2017

Notes from Story Time Blog

Reading and Writing Go Together

Reading and writing go together. Writing helps children learn that letters and words stand for sounds and that print has meaning. One simple way you can show this to children is to occasionally point to the words as you read to them. Take opportunities to write down what children say as they tell it to you. Then you can read it back to them. This activity helps children can learn the connection between the written and the spoken word. It is also very motivating for them to tell their own stories.

Bugging Out

Talking with your child helps them acquire language skills, like vocabulary, narrative skills, and phonological awareness, that will help them understand what they later read.  After you read Bugs! Bugs! Bugs! by Bob Barner, talk to your child about the different types of insects using the questions in the back of the book.

Rainbow Fun

Remember, playing, talking, singing, reading, and writing are five simple practices to help your child on the path to reading. After reading aloud Planting a Rainbow by Lois Ehlert, talk about the colors of the rainbow.  Then ask your child to draw a rainbow.  Learning how to hold a crayon correctly is one of the first steps in learning how to write.  Afterwards, encourage your child to plant a make-believe garden full of the flowers found in the book.

A Brown Bear Parade

There are thousands of apps in the iTunes and Google Play stores, but not all apps for children are created equally. All of the quality apps we use in storytime and on our Family Place iPads have been reviewed favorably by children’s professionals in the technology field. The Brown Bear, Brown Bear app is an extension of the popular children’s book.  Together, you and your child use your senses of sight, touch, and hearing to put together a grand musical parade. You can even create your own sound effects to add to the parade!

Let’s Do Yoga

Play is described as one of the best ways children can learn language and literacy skills. It is the leading source of development in the early years. We are wired to learn through movement—so when your children move, they are building the structures in their brains where more complex learning will later take place. Some books, such as Sleepy Little Yoga by Rebecca Whitford, include ways you can move along, which will keep children engaged and involved during the story. Large motor play, like this and running or climbing, also develops coordination and balance.