Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Scribble Me a Story

Writing starts as scribbles by children. This then develops into letters, words, and sentences. This teaches children that spoken words are shown as written words and that there are other forms of communication.

A Hippo in Our Yard

Talking with children develops their early literacy skills by helping them learn letters, word sounds, and new vocabulary.  Making predictions and talking with children about what they think will happen helps them invest in the story. As you read A Hippo in Our Yard, see if your child can predict what Sally will do on each page!

What Does This Mean?

Reading and talking with your child helps build vocabulary by introducing new words. When you read a book to your child, it’s okay to stop briefly to point out a new word and what it means.

Rabbit Magic

If you want to see a real magic trick after reading Rabbit Magic, go online with your child and watch videos on YouTube. This is called joint media engagement, when people use technology together. According to research, children learn faster if engaged with technology in a social setting than when they engage with technology by themselves.

Are You Ready to Be a Construction Worker?

One benefit of playing make-believe at home (besides being so fun) is that it encourages vocabulary and language development. The cool characters and settings that we see so often in picture books, such as With Any Luck, I’ll Drive a Drive, can inspire new ideas for playtime. Are you ready to be a construction worker or a fire fighter?

Songs for the Whole Family

Being able to break down words into smaller sounds is one of the biggest benefits of singing as it will help children sound out words into smaller parts when they get ready to read independently.

We often spend a lot of time in our cars. Take advantage of this time to listen to some fun songs that the whole family can sing! The Library has many CDs to check out. You even want to try one of our favorites from storytime such as Laurie Berkner.

Jump for Jazz

Digital literacy is the ability to understand, evaluate, and use information when it is presented by a computer, tablet, or other digital media. With so much technology present in our daily lives, we want to provide information to help you navigate the world of technology with your child.

If your child just loves music, check out the Channel 11 www.pbs.org website. On their music games page at http://pbskids.org/games/music/, you’ll find over a dozen music-themed child-appropriate online games.  You can connect this experience to books by checking out a fun music title such as Jazzmatazz.  There are also fun, education apps you can download or use at the library such as Jazzy Day.

Monsters Galore

Play gives you and your children lots of opportunities to pretend. Pretend to be monsters as you recite the following rhyme.  Remember children learn best by doing so acting out the meaning of words while you are playing will help your child remember new vocabulary.

Monsters Galore

Monsters galore, can you roar?   (Roar)

Monsters galore, can you soar?  (Flying motions)

Monsters galore, please shut the door. (Clap)

Monsters galore, fall on the floor!   (Sit/fall down)

 

Things That Go

Give your child plenty of opportunities to draw and write. Talk to your child about what he or she draws. Books that show writing as part of everyday life will help your child see its many uses. For example, point out the writing on the signs as you read My Truck Is Stuck.

Developing Fine Motor Skills

Toys that children to pick up, pull, or grip will help them develop their fine motor skills. This will help when they are learning to write!