Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Have You Seen a Sloth?

This week our focus is on digital literacy and ways you can use technology to enhance reading or book-sharing time. Sometimes in books you’ll come across animals (such as ones in Slowly, Slowy, Slowly Said the Sloth) that are new to your child—and maybe to you, too. Go to a zoo’s website and see if the animal lives there or search for videos on YouTube. Turn on the volume and see what noises those animals make. Your child will get to see actual photos or videos of these animals in addition to the illustrated ones in the book. Using the internet in this way is great for expanding your child’s curiosity and vocabulary.

Acting Out Stories

Play offers many enjoyable opportunities to develop language. The most critical aspect of play as it relates to language development is that children learn to think symbolically. They learn that one thing can represent another thing. It is this very kind of thinking that is used in language.

Have your child use his/her whole body to act out Pepito the Brave.  This will help your child internalize and understand what is happening in the story. This process will later help them understand what they read.

Giraffes Can’t Dance

Singing is one way to help your child be ready to read. Children don’t care if you can’t carry a tune! Singing breaks down words into smaller parts and helps children hear the sounds that make up words. Singing can also help some children remember things better than just spoken word.

Stories and songs go great together! Try reading Giraffes Can’t Dance.  Then make up a silly song about it.  .

 

Reading and Rhyming

Reading rhyming books, such as Where’s Pup?, helps kids improve their oral language skills, which help them become readers.  Rhyming is a fun and easy thing to incorporate into your day.

Playing With Books

When children are young, they treat books as they would any other toy—they play with them! They may put them in their mouths or even tear them. When you allow children to explore books, they are learning how to handle them. It takes time and practice for kids to learn how to hold books and turn the pages.

Talk to Your Baby

It may seem silly to remind parents to talk to their children. But it is important to note that the frequency and the complexity of how you talk with them does matter. Often when we talk with children, we are simply telling them what to do (business talk). Researchers have found that extra talk makes a difference in the amount of language and knowledge that children have. Adding descriptive information or telling stories about experiences helps children learn more about their world.

It’s Puppet Time

Use stuffed animals or puppets to sing songs, read stories, or talk to your baby. Even siblings can help with this fun activity!  No puppets at home? Ask about our collection of puppets that can be checked out!

What Kind of Truck Is This?

Reading books is a great way to introduce your child to new vocabulary words.  It is okay to stop the story to talk about what the words mean.  While reading Machines at Work, talk to your child about different kinds of trucks.

Let’s Get Moving and Grooving

With summer here, take this opportunity to check out some CDs to play in the car or at home and sing along. This is a great way to develop language skills for reading while having fun moving and grooving.

Penguins Love Colors

As you read a book to your child, point to the words in the title and any words written in a different color or font.  This will help your child understand that writing has meaning.