Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Play to Learn

Play offers many enjoyable opportunities to develop language. The most critical aspect of play as it relates to language is that children learn to think symbolically. Play is not just fun. It is also how children learn and understand new concepts and ideas.

Your Baby Needs to Hear Your Voice

Talking with your baby is so important – your baby needs to hear the sounds of your language! Until about six months of age your baby is a “universal linguist,” meaning he/she can distinguish among each of the 150 sounds of human speech. By 12 months, babies recognize the speech sounds only of the languages they hear from people who talk and play with them.

Why Read Aloud to Your Baby?

Reading aloud to babies exposes them to more words than they hear in conversation. Machines at Work by Byron Barton contains unusual words such as rubble and cement. It’s okay if babies don’t understand all the words they hear.  They are still learning about language while they listen.

We Love to Sing Along!

The Library has many songs that have been made into books. Singing the words as you read along with your baby is a good way to keep his/her attention.

Read to Me

 Make reading fun by engaging your child in the story by reading lift-the-flap books, singing as you read, or talking to your baby about things they see in the pictures.  It’s more important that reading to your child is enjoyable rather than long. Follow your child’s mood.

Tech Time Totes

The Library now has Tech Time Totes available to check out. Each contains books, a technology toy, and activities for your child. There are also all kinds of tips for adults on ways to model technology for children.

Don’t Wake Up the Tiger

Don’t Wake Up the Tiger by  Britta Teckentrup uses a lot of hand motions! Active motions like these while reading any lively picture book gives an opportunity to manipulate finger and hand muscles, which helps later on when writing with those same muscles.

What Shapes Do the Clouds Make?

Talking prepares your child to learn to read by helping them acquire language skills and teaching them new vocabulary. Talk to your kids throughout the day about anything and everything. In It Looked Like Spilt Milk by  Charles Shaw, your child will get a chance to see different things in the shapes of the clouds. Looking at the world around you and talking to your child about what you see can be done anywhere. Next time you see clouds in the sky, ask your child what he or she sees.

Put Your “T” in the Air

Before children can identify the differences between letters, children first need to identify differences between shapes.  When reading at home, be on the lookout for letters with “special” shapes, like the letters in children’s names. Hunt for curvy lines, straight lines, or even

circles!

As a fun activity, you might want to try singing the following rhyme with the letter “T” with your child. Trace the letter with your finger. See how it has two straight lines?

 

 

Put Your “T” in the Air  (to tune of “Put Your Finger in the Air”)

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Put your “T” in the air, and let’s hold it out to there.

Put your “T” in the air, in the air.

Other Verses:  “on your knee….and jump along with me”

                          “behind your back….and let’s pretend to eat a snack”

                       “on your nose…and then onto your toes”

 

Print and Technology Work Together

Experts recommend parents be very involved in their child’s experience with electronic devices, especially at a young age. Print books and technology can work together to enhance your child’s overall learning experience.

As you read a book with your child, use your  index (pointer) fingers to trace the shapes (in the book, on the floor, on child’s back, etc.). Fine motor control helps children when using technology such as a tablet. Children may begin by using both hands and all of their fingers, and then transition to using just one finger to push, swipe, and move things on the screen.