Notes from Story Time

Notes from Story Time Blog

Songs for the Whole Family

Being able to break down words into smaller sounds is one of the biggest benefits of singing as it will help children sound out words into smaller parts when they get ready to read independently.

We often spend a lot of time in our cars. Take advantage of this time to listen to some fun songs that the whole family can sing! The Library has many CDs to check out. You even want to try one of our favorites from storytime such as Laurie Berkner.

Jump for Jazz

Digital literacy is the ability to understand, evaluate, and use information when it is presented by a computer, tablet, or other digital media. With so much technology present in our daily lives, we want to provide information to help you navigate the world of technology with your child.

If your child just loves music, check out the Channel 11 www.pbs.org website. On their music games page at http://pbskids.org/games/music/, you’ll find over a dozen music-themed child-appropriate online games.  You can connect this experience to books by checking out a fun music title such as Jazzmatazz.  There are also fun, education apps you can download or use at the library such as Jazzy Day.

Monsters Galore

Play gives you and your children lots of opportunities to pretend. Pretend to be monsters as you recite the following rhyme.  Remember children learn best by doing so acting out the meaning of words while you are playing will help your child remember new vocabulary.

Monsters Galore

Monsters galore, can you roar?   (Roar)

Monsters galore, can you soar?  (Flying motions)

Monsters galore, please shut the door. (Clap)

Monsters galore, fall on the floor!   (Sit/fall down)

 

Things That Go

Give your child plenty of opportunities to draw and write. Talk to your child about what he or she draws. Books that show writing as part of everyday life will help your child see its many uses. For example, point out the writing on the signs as you read My Truck Is Stuck.

Developing Fine Motor Skills

Toys that children to pick up, pull, or grip will help them develop their fine motor skills. This will help when they are learning to write!

Play to Learn

Play offers many enjoyable opportunities to develop language. The most critical aspect of play as it relates to language is that children learn to think symbolically. Play is not just fun. It is also how children learn and understand new concepts and ideas.

Your Baby Needs to Hear Your Voice

Talking with your baby is so important – your baby needs to hear the sounds of your language! Until about six months of age your baby is a “universal linguist,” meaning he/she can distinguish among each of the 150 sounds of human speech. By 12 months, babies recognize the speech sounds only of the languages they hear from people who talk and play with them.

Why Read Aloud to Your Baby?

Reading aloud to babies exposes them to more words than they hear in conversation. Machines at Work by Byron Barton contains unusual words such as rubble and cement. It’s okay if babies don’t understand all the words they hear.  They are still learning about language while they listen.

We Love to Sing Along!

The Library has many songs that have been made into books. Singing the words as you read along with your baby is a good way to keep his/her attention.

Read to Me

 Make reading fun by engaging your child in the story by reading lift-the-flap books, singing as you read, or talking to your baby about things they see in the pictures.  It’s more important that reading to your child is enjoyable rather than long. Follow your child’s mood.