Check It Out Category: Fiction

Fiction: The Danish Girl by David Ebershoff

50 Days of Summer Reading BannerThere are 39 more days until the end of Summer Reading! Every day during our countdown we will be featuring slices of library life, books, and topics designed to help you out as you work through 2017 Summer Reading at Mount Prospect. Read more about how you can join in on this celebration of reading and enter to win prizes!

Gently based upon the true story of transgender Einar Wegener/Lili Elbe, The Danish Girl by David Ebershoff is a story of love and self-realization, and the importance of living your life as the person you were meant to be. Einar is a well respected landscape painter and professor, shy and soft spoken. His wife Gerda is a large, strong, blond-haired portrait artist, who has left her wealthy California family to live and paint with Einar in the Widow House, in Denmark. When Gerda’s female model is unable to make it for a sitting, Gerda persuades Einar to put on her dress and stockings and pose in her stead. This unleashes Lili, who over time becomes a larger part of of Einar’s life and, with the encouragement of Gerda, takes her place in their lives. However Lili must also confront the culture of early 20th century Europe and the infancy of the medical sex reassignment field, in order to truly live her life as herself, whatever the risks.

For DIY Designers…
This could count as a book from a genre you haven’t tried (historical fiction) and a book that was made into a movie.

For Master Class Designers…
This could count as a book made into an Academy Award winning movie.

Fiction: 1984 by George Orwell

50 Days of Summer Reading BannerThere are 42 more days until the end of Summer Reading! Every day during our countdown we will be featuring slices of library life, books, and topics designed to help you out as you work through 2017 Summer Reading at Mount Prospect. Read more about how you can join in on this celebration of reading and enter to win prizes!

George Orwell’s prescient 1984 is the dystopian novel against which all others are measured, even almost 60 years later. It would be impossible to read this and not see a plethora of connections between the hurriedly detached society in which Winston Smith resides, where people are too wrapped up in the tawdry details of entertainment magazines to resist the increasing attacks on their privacy and freedom, and our own, where headline news spins 24 hours a day and citizens must take it upon themselves to learn which news is fake and which is true. It is just this muddled reality of which 1984 forewarns. In Winston’s case this fake news is propagated by the government, in an attempt to mollify the populace and severely cripple even their desire to stand up for themselves. Censorship, Surveillance and Mind Control were all employed to stifle humanity, but will Winston overcome these elaborate mind games?

For the DIY Designers…
This could count as a book everyone’s talking about, or a book that was made into a movie.

For the Master Class Designers…
This could count as a challenged/banned book.

Fiction: Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

50 Days of Summer Reading Banner

There are 45 more days until the end of Summer Reading! Every day during our countdown we will be featuring slices of library life, books, and topics designed to help you out as you work through 2017 Summer Reading at Mount Prospect. Read more about how you can join in on this celebration of reading and enter to win prizes!

Stepping off the bustling streets of San Francisco into the dark, antiquated Mr. Penumbra’s Twenty-Four Hour Bookstore to look for a job might seem like an odd choice for a web designer, but the reality of the early 21st century Great Recession leaves Clay Jannon looking for work in whatever capacity he can find it. Realizing almost immediately that this bookstore is even stranger than he initially assumed, he wonders how it is able to stay in business with virtually no customers. Oddest of all is that the regulars who frequent the store never buy anything, and instead spend hours looking through books in seemingly indecipherable languages. Through a web of puzzles, secrets and clandestine meetings, author Robin Sloan explores the links between our modern computer-driven culture and the dynamic and ubiquitous book culture it is predicated on.

Read this for Summer Reading!

For DIY Designers…
This could count as a book from a genre you’ve never read before (metaphysical/visionary fiction) or a book with a big city setting.

For Master Class Designers…
This could count as a book with a big city setting.

Fiction: Universal Harvester by John Darnielle

50 Days of Summer Reading BannerThere are 47 more days until the end of Summer Reading! Every day during our countdown we will be featuring slices of library life, books, and topics designed to help you out as you work through 2017 Summer Reading at Mount Prospect. Read more about how you can join in on this celebration of reading and enter to win prizes!

Universal Harvester book cover MPPL has a Goodreads discussion group!  Whether you’d like to join in on the conversation or just observe, you can hear about what books other participants are reading for the summer. As a result you may find books you might want to read too, such as Universal Harvester by John Darnielle. This horror book was shared by a member of the group and may be a great reading choice for you if you are a fan of….

…strange VHS tapes, mysterious narrators, creepy stories, foreboding settings, and nods to urban legends.

Read this for Summer Reading!

For the DIY Designers…
This could count as a book from your favorite genre, a genre you haven’t tried before (horror),

For the Master Class Designers…
This could count as a scary book and as a book highlighted on the MPPL website.

Fiction: Crimes Against a Book Club by Kathy Cooperman

50 Days of Summer Reading Banner

There are 50 more days until the end of Summer Reading! Every day during our countdown we will be featuring slices of library life, books, and topics designed to help you out as you work through 2017 Summer Reading at Mount Prospect. Read more about how you can join in on this celebration of reading and enter to win prizes!

Crimes Against a Book Club book coverBest friends Annie and Sarah need money fast. Their solution? Sell face cream for $2000 a jar to Annie’s rich book club members. The face cream is a hit, and they both finally have hope to combat their growing medical bills. However, there might be an illegal substance in the ingredients that will cause them serious trouble if anyone finds out about it. While Crimes Against a Book Club by Kathy Cooperman may cause you to trust your book club a little less, it will at least have you laughing!

Read this for summer reading!

For the DIY Designers…
This could count as a book from a favorite genre or a genre you haven’t tried before (this could be categorized as chick lit and a caper novel).

For the Master Class Designers…
This could count as a humorous book and as a book highlighted on our MPPL website.

Newer Books You Might Enjoy, Part Two

Does warmer weather make you thirsty for a new read? Whether looking to thrill your heart, excite your mind, lift your spirits, or escape to a different time or place, there’s a story for you — and we want to help you find it!  Below is a second set of hand-picked selections [part one is here] most likely to keep those pages turning during the hazy days of summer.

Picture of Jenny

Jenny says….

On the surface, recent releases Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig and The Garden of Small Beginnings by Abbi Waxman might not have a lot in common, however, both novels deftly balance talking about harder issues with light touches of humor and stunning grace.

Ginny Moon book cover

Meet Ginny Moon, a spunky, hilarious, and earnest 14-year-old girl who has everyone around her worried as she obsesses about the Baby Doll she left behind when she was saved from her birth mom five years ago. As Ginny shares her perspective as an adopted teenager with autism coming to terms with an abusive past, readers get to experience her joys and frustrations right along with her while she goes to extraordinary lengths to find her Baby Doll. Benjamin Ludwig will take you on a roller-coaster of emotion this summer with his debut Ginny Moon!

 

 

The Garden of Small Beginnings book cover

Filled with quirky characters, a chance of new love, and a strong family, The Garden of Small Beginnings is a ticket into a realistic slice of someone else’s life. It’s been almost five years since Lilli’s husband died and she was left to raise two young children with the help of her supportive sister. As Lilli and her family continue to work through their healing, a gardening class Lilli’s boss is making her sign up for holds an unexpected chance for a new beginning. For the reader looking for humor, heart, and healing, Abbi Waxman’s latest is a summer must.

 

 

Cathleen says….

He Said / She Said by Erin Kelly, expected in June, and New Boy by Tracy Chevalier, released last week, are two absorbing stories that turn dark motives into exciting storytelling.

He Said_She Said book cover

1999. In the afterglow of a total solar eclipse, Laura and her boyfriend Kit turn a corner to see what appears to be a violent assault. He said…it was consensual. She said…well, nothing out loud, but the look in her eyes tells Laura all she needs to know. The man is convicted because of Laura’s testimony, but sixteen years later it is Kit and Laura who live in hiding. With another eclipse expected, is this the time for harsh truths finally to be brought into the light? Find out in Erin Kelly’s debut He Said / She Said.

 

 

New Boy book cover

Transport the play Othello to an elementary school in 1970s Washington, D.C., and you have drama ripe for social commentary via sixth graders. In New Boy, a diplomat’s son is the first and only black student the school has ever enrolled. When he easily befriends popular girl Dee, it is too much for Ian, the class bully, who already feels threatened. The playground proves a ready-made setting for the jealousy and manipulation of Shakespeare’s classic, and you won’t want to miss how it ‘plays’ out.

Newer Books You Might Enjoy, Part One

Summer is on its way! To help you prepare for your reading-in-the-sunshine endeavors, we have dipped our toes in recent book releases, poured over top new release lists, and examined reviews just to land on stand-out titles that resonated with us that you would enjoy, too. We’ll be back next week for part two!

Cathleen says….

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman, new this month, and Borne by Jeff VanderMeer, released in April, are two very different reads that make lasting impressions.

 

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine book coverWe love championing a debut, but I’ll be honest: this book pitch practically sells itself. A popular way to describe Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is as A Man Called Ove meets The Rosie Project, which right there tells you almost all you need to know. Eleanor is a prickly, solitary woman who (hilariously) speaks her mind and is just fine with avoiding all human interaction. When in a short time she meets a local musician, needs to call on her work’s IT guy, and helps an elderly gentleman who’s fallen, she finds herself being pulled into a world with other people. Take the time to get to know Eleanor. You’ll be very glad you did.

 

 

Borne book cover

“What did I just read?!?” This was my reaction to Jeff VanderMeer’s stupefying Southern Reach trilogy, so I thought I was prepared for his newest. Borne is something new altogether. We start with the discovery of a fist-sized purple blob caught in the fur of a gigantic flying bear our narrator is using to scavenge for biotech scraps, and it gets weirder from there. The plot may be impossible to summarize in a way that does it justice, but reviewers are comparing to Cormac McCarthy and Margaret Atwood. Smart, literate, and mind-blowing, it’s quite a ride.

 

 

 

Picture of Jenny

Jenny says….

Try What it Means When a Man Falls from the Sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah, released April 2017, and Do Not Become Alarmed by Maile Meloy, releasing in June 2017.

 

What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky book cover
I am obsessed with this story collection right now. Arimah covers a lot of ground as she plays with different genres and explores what it means to be a girl, family dynamics, and the relationships people have with the world around them. With sentences like “[the Mathematicians are] …calculating and subtracting emotions, drawing them from living bodies like poison from a wound,” this short story collection is something to be savored. My favorites ended up being “Light”, “Redemption”, “Wild”, and the title story. I’d love to hear your thoughts if you read them!

 

 

Do Not Become Alarmed book cover

The relaxing cruise trip cousins Liv and Nora have planned for their families takes a dark turn when their children go missing off of the coast of Central America leaving the parents to work out their feelings of guilt, fear and powerlessness. Best read under a hot sticky sun, Do Not Become Alarmed was something I finished in almost one sitting, as it begs you to keep turning the pages to figure out how everything can possibly end okay!

 

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, we want to bring your attention to a few of the many amazing authors who are from, or trace their roots back to, the Asian Pacific region.

Book Cover of EdinburghAlexander Chee is the author of two novels. Edinburgh, set in Maine, details in beautiful and haunting prose the profound damage and destruction of abuse, as we follow the life of a young Korean-American boy named Fee and the path his life takes in the months and years following his victimization. Chee’s second novel The Queen of the Night is another powerful tale, this time centering on  Book Cover of The Queen of the Nightstrong women in a repressive 19th century world. The Queen of the Night chronicles the rise to fame of a supremely gifted opera singer, who overcomes a forlorn past with a bravado befitting the lyrical profession in which she thrives.

 

 

Book Cover of Everything I Never Told You

 

Celeste Ng made her breakthrough debut in 2014 with the instant classic, Everything I Never Told You. It is the story of a Chinese American father and white American mother, who must grapple with the death of their daughter, the unrealistic expectations they’d set for her, and the clouds of doubt, resentment and racism that are fracturing them apart.

 

 

 

Book Cover of The Sympathizer

 

Viet Thanh Nguyen authored a collection of short stories and a nonfiction work about the Vietnam War before writing his thought-provoking novel, The Sympathizer. This is a suspenseful, fast-paced tale of espionage and heartbreak that centers on a duplicitous half-French half-Vietnamese army captain and his resettlement in the United States after the fall of Saigon.

 

 

Book Cover of Moshi Moshi

 

Banana Yoshimoto’s latest novel Moshi-Moshi is a poignant and wistful story about a daughter trying to make sense of her father’s death in a suicide pact with a woman who was not her mother. The book explores the grief process both Yocchan and her mom take, while her father’s ghost tries to contact Yocchan through her dreams. The hip Tokyo neighborhood of Shimokitazawa is very much a character here, as it vividly comes to life through Yoshimoto’s evocative language.

Book Discussion Questions: Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

Our Souls at Night book coverTitle:  Our Souls at Night
Author:  Kent Haruf
Page Count: 179 pages
Genre:  Literary Fiction, Love Stories
Tone:  Reflective, Bittersweet, Moving

Summary:
In Holt, Colorado, widower Louis Waters is initially thrown when the widowed Addie Moore suggests that they spend time together, in bed, to stave off loneliness, but soon they are exchanging confidences and memories.

SPOILER WARNING: These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

The Library is happy to share these original questions for your use. If reproducing, please credit with the following statement:  2017 Mount Prospect Public Library. All rights reserved. Used with Permission.

1. Imagine yourself a resident of Holt. If you discovered (or suspected) the evening visits, would you have an opinion? What if you were a member of the family?

2. The first sentences read, “And then there was the day when Addie Moore made a call on Louis Waters. It was an evening in May just before full dark.” In your opinion, how effective is this as a first line? What does it convey?

  1. 3. Is it significant that the proposal was at Addie’s instigation rather than Louis’s? How so? What would have been different in the story otherwise?

4. Does this proposal seem outrageous to you? Understandable? Was it brave?

5. Ruth says of Louis, “But he’s no saint. He’s caused his share of pain.” Did that surprise you at the time? Is it better for the story than Louis isn’t a saint?

6. The arrangement is a chance for these two individuals to revisit with each other what has happened in their pasts. What is the appeal of this? Which of those memories made the biggest impact on their relationship? On you as a reader?

7. How interesting is it for a reader to just listen in on characters’ conversations? Is it a talent of the author to make this interesting? Did you want something more to happen?

8. Do the characters think of this relationship as casual? At what point do you think the relationship became more for Addie? For Louis?

9. Was it inevitable that their relationship became sexual? Did you want it to? Were you surprised how deep into the story we were before it did?

10. We see strong instances of their children reproaching the parents about this arrangement. What did you think of that?

11. Gene could arguably be a villain in this story. What did you think of him? Was he at all justified in his concerns or actions?

12. How did the introduction of Jamie change their relationship? Of Bonny?

13. Contrast their interactions with Jamie to what we know of their relationships with their own children.

14. In one passage, Louis confesses:

I think I regret hurting Tamara more than I do hurting my wife. I failed my spirit or something. I missed some kind of call to be something more than a mediocre high school English teacher in a little dirt-blown town.

What does this tell us about Louis? Does it affect your view of him?

15. In what places of the story did you find humor?

16. Gene gives an ultimatum. Did Addie make the right choice? Is there a ‘right’ choice?

17. Later, Addie calls (again, her initiative) and wants to connect again. At first Louis balks, asking, “isn’t this the sneaking around we didn’t want to do?” What would you have done?

18. Did you want more from the ending? Why did Haruf make this choice?

19. A New York Times review asserts that Haruf’s “great subject was the struggle of decency against small-mindedness, and his rare gift was to make sheer decency a moving subject.” Do you see evidence of this struggle in Our Souls at Night? Again, putting yourself in the place of an observer/family, would you take any issue with the word ‘decency’?

20. This book was written as Haruf knew his time was limited. What did he want most to say? Should this be in our minds as we read? If you knew, did this affect your reading of the story?

21. When undertaking the project, Haruf told his wife Cathy, “I’m going to write a book about us.” What elements do you suspect were autobiographical?

22. Did you find the lack of quotation marks distracting? Why might the author make this choice?

23. Haruf’s style is almost always described as “spare” and his characters “plainspoken”. Are these qualities appealing to you?

24. Do you think his style and chosen setting may have held him back from wider recognition?

25. One writer commented that Our Souls at Night “engages sentiment without becoming sentimental”. What do you think about that statement?

26. Is this a sad or heavy book? How would you describe the feeling to someone else?

27. An upcoming film adaptation stars Robert Redford and Jane Fonda. How does that fit the characters in your mind? Are you interested in viewing the film?

Want help with your book discussion group? Check out tips, advice, and all the ways the Library can help support your group!

OTHER RESOURCES:

Kent Haruf’s Last Novel is a Beautiful Gift” via The Oregonian
Final interview with Kent Haruf courtesy of Denver Center of Performing Arts
Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel review and analysis of Our Souls at Night
LitLovers discussion guide
Our Souls at Night competes in the Tournament of Books
Cathy Haruf on Her Husband’s Final Novel” via Knopf Doubleday

READALIKES:

To Be Sung Underwater book coverTo Be Sung Underwater
by Tom McNeal

Lila
by Marilynne Robinson

O Pioneers book coverO Pioneers!
by Willa Cather

Asked at the Desk: Classic American Novels

Picture of Fiction/AV/Teen desk

When we receive the same question twice in one week, we take note! Here’s what two of your neighbors recently asked:

I haven’t read more than one or two of the classic American novels. Now I’m ready, but I don’t know which are most important. Also, do you have them as audiobooks?

We understand this can be overwhelming. Not only are there differing opinions about the most essential, there are different definitions of classic! Here we’ll suggest American classics in three categories to help you find your gateway.

Shorter American Classics

If delving into classic literature is new for you, try one that is not only short in length but also accessible in story and writing:

Great Gatsby book coverThe Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Fahrenheit 451 book coverFahrenheit 451
Ray Bradbury
John Steinbeck

 

American Classics by Authors of Color

Too many lists of classics limit the rosters to those authored by white men. Make the choice to invest in other perspectives.

Invisible Man book coverInvisible Man
Ralph Ellison
Their Eyes Were Watching God book coverTheir Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston
W.E.B. Du Bois

 

Most Cited American Classics

If your goal is to be familiar with books likely to be referenced in conversation or in other writing, here are three to know:

J.D. Salinger

 

Audiobooks are a great way to experience the classics! Let a talented voice actor bring great writing to life for you. Click for a sampling of American classics on audio. Lists of British classics and World classics are also available.

Interested in more suggestions? Stop by Fiction/AV/Teen Services on the second floor to ask at the desk yourself, or ask online to visit our virtual desk.