Check It Out Category: 2017 Winter Reading

What Has Mount Prospect Been Resolving and Reading?

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! It’s not too late to participate in Winter Reading. You still have a few days to share what you’ve been striving to achieve, enter to win some neat prizes, and share your experiences on the community pillar.

Take a look at what your neighbors have been sharing.

Mount Prospect readers have resolved to…

picture of reading resolutions for winter reading

1. Get back into actively reading.

2. Read: A Brontë sister book, a Mormon studies books, a January 2017 or February 2017 book of the month club book, a non-Brontë work of classic literature, and some thing that has been sitting on my Goodreads reading list for over a year.

3. I will finally read a Western.

4. Read five different genre/styles of books for the Winter Reading Program.

Some books read so far have been…

picture of books read for winter reading
  1. Nicotine by Nell Zink
    Zink’s books are for those who find sameness and predictability maddening and who despise boring characters. Zink creates situations that are messy and uncomfortable, but the ick factor is worth pushing through to see what kinds of ideals will pop into her character’s head next. -Carol

Presence by Amy Cuddy
I love the idea of fake it until you become it!

I read Men Explains Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit spontaneously. I saw a copy of the modest paperback and that brightly sarcastic title called to me. When I wasn’t laughing at her sharp humor, I was crying in fury… and now I recommend it to everyone.

Flight by Sherman Alexie
A young troubled boy, an orphan, finds his way when her goes into a time warp. He discovers what is important and who really loves him. Sometimes very brutal!

Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë
Anne was the BEST Brontë!


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Taking Inspiration from TV Readers

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Parisian Novels by Van Gogh

 

Who: Rebeca from Collection Management

What is your reading resolution?

About ten years ago I started a list of books that are featured on television shows that I watch. This year I am going to read at least 5 books off that list.

Why did you choose this?

I rarely read outside of two genres.  I believe this will help me read a variety of different books.

What are you thinking of reading to complete your resolution?

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring by Alexander Rose
The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg

Island of Dr Moreau book cover Washingtons Spies book cover Invisible Man book coverFrom the Mixed Up Files book cover

 

 

 

 

 


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Science Fiction by Diverse Authors, Current Events, and More!

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Who: Allison from South Branch

What are some of your reading resolutions?
I decided that for 2017 I was going to give myself a reading theme: Science Fiction by Diverse Authors!

2- Why did you choose that?
I used to read science fiction quite avidly, and when Library Journal published a mini-article on Diverse Authors within the SF/Fantasy genre, my interest was piqued! At the end of last year I read The Three-Body Problem by Ken Liu, and wanted to keep going in that vein…. Here’s the thing…I got a little distracted since deciding on that theme, so here are my one-off resolutions from the last few weeks….

Something with feminism! Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit
Something in Spanish! Afrodita by Isabel Allende
Something about gender! None of the Above by I.W. Gregorio
Something about current events! Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

3- Have you completed a resolution yet? How did it go?
I am finally reading Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor, which totally falls under my original reading resolution, and am enjoying it so far! It’s set in Nigeria, and I love how carefully she builds suspense, piece by piece!


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Reading Books That Bring Excitement

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Who: Claire from Youth Services

1- What are some of your reading resolutions?
Ultimately, I wanted to read books I was excited about. So I picked up books and then figured out what resolution they could fit later. It just so happened that these books were in new genres, and from displays. I was also so inspired by one book that I read that I wrote a review for it.

2- What have you been reading to complete your resolutions?
I read a short story, The Beach at Night by Elena Ferrante, and a novella, And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman. These were new genres for me, at least, I don’t read a lot of them. I also read the new nonfiction young adult titles Dear My Blank by Emily Trunko and Making it Right by Marilee Peters, which I found on display. The last one I read was March Book Three by John Lewis, which truthfully, I thought was a new book, but maybe that could go under my own resolution, of reading nonfiction about social issues, which I’m really into these days.

3- Have you completed a resolution yet? How is completing your resolutions going?
So far it hasn’t been hard to find books that I’m interested in that will fit a resolution. Since I’m reading children’s books at the same time, I usually look for shorter, faster reads. Since I have a whole other month of the program, I may read a longer book next.


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Adding Style Variety to My Book Diet

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Who: Linda from IT Services

What is your reading resolution?

My Reading Resolution for the Winter Reading Program is to read five different genres or styles of books. There have been so many great mystery/thriller/psychological novels recently that I have been reading a lot of those, so I decided I wanted to return to reading a wider variety of books.

What are you thinking of reading to complete your resolution?

So far I have read a diary format novel, a graphic novel, and an alternative history novel. Next I plan to read a non-fiction study of animal behavior.

Have you completed a resolution yet? How did it go?

I enjoyed Daytripper by Fábio Moon & Gabriel Bá even though I seldom read graphic novels. I found it to be a moving, thought-provoking story.  And the graphic design and choice of color palettes in the various sections strongly evoked the emotions being portrayed.


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Trying Graphic Novels for the First Time

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Picture of AnneWho: Anne from Research Services

What is one of your reading resolutions?

My resolution was pretty simple–to read a genre other than mystery or general historical fiction. I’ve read graphic novels before but thought I’d try another one. The Exile by Diana Gabaldon caught my eye. The illustrations were dazzling and detailed and the story swept me into a Scotland centuries in the past. It was a good experience; I will keep trying different graphic novels just to have a more cinematic reading experience.

Why did you choose that?

I thought I was getting in a rut in my reading experience. I see so many books in my work at the Library and I find I do not read as widely as I’d like. I thought I’d change that a little this year.

What are you thinking of reading to complete your other resolutions?

I may try reading a science fiction or fantasy novel. To balance that I’ll read a non-fiction book, perhaps a biography. There is so much to choose at MPPL!


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Finishing a Trilogy and Scratching a Serial Itch

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so keep checking back to see what other resolute readers are striving to achieve!

Who: Cathleen from Fiction/AV/Teen Services

What are some of your reading resolutions?

This is the season that I will a) make time to finish the third audiobook of a fascinating trilogy and b) finally try a recommended book for fans of the first season of the podcast Serial.

Why did you choose those?

The first two books of Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach trilogy repeatedly took my breath away — both for the what-is-happening story beats and for the exceptional performances of the audio narrators. I delayed the third, Acceptance, only because I wanted time to reflect and ready myself for where it takes me next. It seems prime timing to indulge before the first movie adaptation (with Natalie Portman and Gina Rodriguez!) is released later this year.

I miss the addictive true crime storytelling of Serial‘s first season, and one of the aspects that hooked me was the reporter’s shifting dynamic with the story she was investigating. We’ve recommended The Journalist and the Murderer by Janet Malcolm as an earlier work that examines that same phenomenon, and it’s time I experienced it firsthand.


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Staff Resolution Feature: Buzzed About Books and Elizabeth Gaskell

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! To help inspire and spark ideas, we’ll be sharing resolutions here every week, so check back next week to see what other people are striving for!

Picture of JennyWho: Jenny from Fiction/AV/Teen Services

What are some of your reading resolutions?

The two I am most excited to finish is to read a book I keep hearing people talk about and to finish North & South by Elizabeth Gaskell.

Why did you choose those?

I keep seeing The Hating Game by Sally Thorne pop up on several of my friends’ Goodreads pages and have heard a lot of my co-workers talk about it. Their enthusiasm for the book is contagious! If I make it a resolution to read it, I can join in the conversation now while they are still buzzing about it, rather than accidentally push it off for other books.

A friend and I started reading North and South together a few years ago. We got about halfway through until we both got distracted from it, so it’s been sitting on my currently reading shelf for 4 years! I finally want to get it off my shelf and doing that at the start of 2017 would be a great start to my reading year.


Now it’s your turn!
Share your reading resolutions on the MPPL Facebook page, on Twitter, or in person at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services Desk.

Resolution: Read a Centennial Book

Winter Reading image

One feature of this year’s Adult Winter Reading is that you decide your own reading resolutions. Whether your goals are modest or ambitious, we’ll cheer you on! One unique challenge you may choose is to Read a Centennial Book, but what does that mean? You can customize that, too! In honor of Mount Prospect’s Centennial (1917-2017) celebration, you might try one of these approaches:


His Family book cover
In the Land of White Death book cover

Read a book published in 1917

Such as…

His Family by Ernest Poole

In the Land of White Death: An Epic Story of Survival in the Siberian Arctic by Valerian Ivanovich Albanov

 


Lost Mount Prospect book cover
Randhurst book cover

Read a book about Mount Prospect

Such as…

Lost Mount Prospect by Gavin W. Kleespies

Randhurst: Suburban Chicago’s Grandest Shopping Center by Gregory T. Peerbolte

 


Never Been a Time book cover
Passchendaele book cover

Read a book about world events in 1917

Such as…

Never Been a Time: The 1917 Race Riot That Sparked the Civil Rights Movement by Harper Barnes

Passchendaele: The Tragic Victory of 1917 by Philip Warner

 


Mata Haris Last Dance book cover
Passage into Light book cover

Read fiction that takes place in 1917

Such as…

Mata Hari’s Last Dance by Michelle Moran

Passage Into Light by Judith Pella

 

 


2001 book cover
Devil at My Heels book cover

Read a book by an author born in 1917

Such as…

2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke

Devil at My Heels: A World War II Hero’s Epic Saga of Torment, Survival, and Forgiveness by Louis Zamperini with David Rensin

 


My Wifes Affair book cover
Warming Up book cover

Read a book by an author who has lived in Mount Prospect

Such as…

My Wife’s Affair by Nancy Woodruff

Warming Up by Mary Hutchings Reed

 

 


Left Behind book cover
Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs book cover

Read a book that specifically references Mount Prospect

Such as…

Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins

Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs: A Historical Guide by Ann Durkin Keating

 


Man of the Forest book cover
Age of Innocence book cover

Read a book published in Mount Prospect’s early years

Such as…

The Man of the Forest by Zane Grey

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

 

Create a Reading Resolution and Enter to Win Prizes

Winter Reading image

Have you been saying you want to read Charles Dickens for the last 10 years? How about finally starting to check books off of your towering to-read list?

Make 2017 your reading year!

This Winter Reading, make up to five of your own reading resolutions, such as finishing a book or trying a genre you’ve never tried before. Check in with us each time you complete one of your five resolutions, and you can enter to win a prize!

Three winners will be drawn every week for eight weeks, and you could be one of them! Plus, you’ll have the satisfaction of starting the year strong.

There is no sign-up, but stop by the Fiction/AV/Teen Services desk to pick up a bookmark to keep track of your progress. Need help? We’re here to be your guides, whether it is to offer book suggestions, brainstorm reading resolutions with you, or cheer you on.