Asked at the Desk: Who Writes Like Liane Moriarty?

Picture of Fiction/AV/Teen deskAn increasingly popular question at the Fiction/AV/Teen Services desk this summer:

Liane Moriarty is a favorite, but I’ve read everything I can find by her.
Do you know any similar authors I could try while I’m waiting for her newest?

We know that as much as you love some authors, they can’t write fast enough to keep up with you! Offering “readalikes” is one of our core services, and here is a sampling of books we’ve suggested to Moriarty fans to great success.


The Slap by Christos Tsiolkas

At a festive barbecue in a Melbourne suburb, a man slaps the child of another couple, triggering a court case and a variety of confrontations within the lives of the families and friends present.

Why this? Multiple perspectives relate a typical neighborhood experience in which something has gone horribly wrong. Sound familiar?


Year We Turned Forty
The Year We Turned Forty by Liz Fenton & Lisa Steinke

Three best friends discover the chance to return to the year they turned forty — the year that altered each of their lives — and also get the opportunity to change their future.

Why this? Though lighter in tone than Moriarty’s stories, the exploration of both the road not taken and how our choices define us will resonate with fans of “what if” narratives.

Us by David NichollsUs book cover

What is it that holds marriages and families together? What happens, and what do we learn about ourselves, when everything threatens to fall apart? Those questions provide the frame for a mild-mannered man who isn’t willing to give up on a life that includes his wife and son.

Why this? It’s not only female authors who balance flawed characters, complex relationships, and those times in which we weigh whether our lives are what we thought they’d be.

PreschooledPreschooled book cover by Anna Lefler

In a darkly humorous story, three characters struggle to find some peace of mind among wealthy parents in a bizarre competition involving their kids. Even while commenting on the over-privilege that allows worry over the trivial, each character is presented with a degree of sympathy and humanity that parents will recognize.

Why this? One of Moriarty’s sharpest themes is skewering middle and aspiring upper class society, especially when it comes to parenting, and this matches both target and tone.

Belong to MeBelong to Me book cover by Marisa de los Santos

Everyone has secrets. While Cornelia gains unexpected insight into her troubled marriage, Piper finds her carefully controlled life unraveling in the wake of a friend’s crisis, and Lake tells a complex series of lies to gain her son’s entry into a school for gifted students.

Why this? This is a thoughtful, layered look at different women struggling to accept the roles in which they find themselves and to navigate family relationships under stress.

More Like Her by Liza PalmerMore Like Her book cover

When Emma Dunham, the woman they believe is the height of female perfection, is murdered by her husband, Francis, Lisa and Jill discover that things aren’t always what they seem, which forces them to come to terms with the secrets of their own lives.

Why this? Secrets, lies, and consequences are favorite themes for Moriarty, as is the idea that what we think we know of others’ lives is often far from the reality.

 
 

If you’ve gulped down this list and want still more, or if you have another bookish question, ask online or stop by the Fiction/AV/Teen desk on the second floor. We’d be excited to connect you with something to fit your mood!