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Teen Blog

Reviews by You!

Incarceron Incarceron
by Catherine Fisher
Finn lives in a prison made of metal and wants to escape. Finding a key, it leads him to a girl, Claudia. She has another key. She believes Finn to be the lost prince Giles and is the rightful leader.
Review submitted by Stephanie.
small steps Small Steps
by Louis Sachar
Small Steps is a sequel to Holes and it tells the entire story of Ziz, Zag, Magnet, X-Ray, Armpit, and Squid and what happens once they live their own real lives.
Review submitted by Michael.
HungerGames The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins
The Hunger Games was basically about a girl named Katniss fighting for her country. She volunteered to fight. Along the way, she fell in love.
Review submitted by Chelsea.
Public Enemies Superman, Batman: Public Enemies
by Jeph Loeb, Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, Dave Stewart, and Richard Starkings
Great comic book/graphic novel that has amazing illustrations! Also, a very good story that compares Superman and Batman. They have different lives! 5/5 stars!
Review submitted by Dev.
Ugly Truth The Ugly Truth
by Jeff Kinney
This is a very funny book. It tells the life of a boy in middle school. It shows his life in a very funny manner that will make you want to keep reading.
Review submitted by Rithia.
Divergent Divergent
by Veronica Roth
Very, very good book! The main characters’ challenges and hardships were very detailed and it seems like you’re taking her place. Over all the book was awesome and I can’t wait until the third book comes out in October!
Review submitted by Tania
Scurvy Goonda Scurvy Goonda
by Chris McCoy
This book is about a pirate Scurvy and he is ruining Ted Merrit’s life.
Review submitted by Joshua.
Mississippi Trial, 1955 Mississippi Trial, 1955
by Chris Crowe
Hiram was so excited to be spending the summer of 1955 with his grandfather in Mississippi until the body of Emmett Till was discovered. Hiram’s views of Mississippi, his grandfather, and his father all change as he searches for answers of what happened to Emmett.
Review submitted by Emma.
Atlantis Complex The Atlantis Complex
by Eoin Colfer
The Atlantis Complex by Eoin Colfer describers the adventure of a genius kid trying to save the world with the help of a few friends.
Review submitted by Lia.
Bloom Bloom
by Elizabeth Scott
Bloom is an intense story of how to not be scared of being yourself, that life is not perfect and does not have to be. Lauren will discover that as she learns to let go and open up to the world.
Review submitted by Diana.

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By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on August 14, 2013 Categories: Action/Adventure, Dystopian, Fantasy, Fiction, Funny, Graphic Novel, Realistic Fiction, Reviews By You

Reviews by You!

 

Running Dream The Running Dream
by Wendelin Van Draanen
I loved this book! It is a cross between emotional and exciting. I’d recommend this book to people who like realistic fiction stories. It is a book you will not want to put down!
Review submitted by Brianna.
DiaryWimpyKid Diary of a Wimpy Kid
by Jeff Kinney
I really liked the book Diary of a Wimpy Kid, because it is talking about a boy who is just about to start middle school. Greg had a bad day on his 1st day of school. I would rate this book 5/5 stars.
Review submitted by Vrund.
Lawn Boy Lawn Boy
by Gary Paulsen
A boy (the book does not tell the boy’s name) gets a lawn mower from his grandma and finds a boy named Arnold to be his stock person, so he has a big lawn mowing business. But will the business be too big for his family? Find out in Lawn Boy!
Review submitted by Michael.
Spellbinder Spellbinder
by Helen Stringer
Five stars! Wonderful theme! Amusing, entertaining. Those two words describe this book perfectly!
Review submitted by David.
Darth Vader Darth Vader and Son
by Jeffrey Brown
This is a great book! It is amazing and very humorous. The characters are Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker (as a young boy). If you love Star Wars, you’ll definitely love this quick-read. 5/5 stars!
Review submitted by Dev.
Angel Experiment The Angel Experiment
by James Patterson
6/5 stars! This series is amazing! If you love sci-fi, you should read this.
Review submitted by Morgan.
Tale Dark and Grimm A Tale Dark & Grimm
by Adam Gidwitz
This was a book that is seamlessly good, what can go wrong with Hansel and Gretal? A lot. This book is bloody and gruesome, not for the faint of heart, but it is a great read on a stormy day.
Review submitted by Kelsey.
HungerGames The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins
It was a really great book with a main goal to survive the Hunger Games. An easy, fun to read book with little details that brighten up your day. Very adventurous but has a bit of romance in it as well.
Review submitted by Tania.
Insurgent Insurgent
by Veronica Roth
Insurgent was an exciting sequel to Divergent. The story always left you wanting more. Four and Tris struggled together, while still finding a way to show passion.
Review submitted by Kate.
Hobbit The Hobbit
by J.R.R. Tolkien
The Hobbit is about Bilbo, a hobbit living in the shire. Bilbo goes on a long journey to help another hobbit take back his throne. Bilbo faces deadly challenges and finds a ring that can turn him invisible. The Hobbit is a book that I think most teens will love.
Review submitted by MacKenzie.

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By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on July 23, 2013 Categories: Dystopian, Fantasy, Fiction, Funny, Graphic Novel, Horror, Realistic Fiction, Reviews By You, Science Fiction

Reviews by You!

Macbeth Macbeth
by Shakespeare
Macbeth and his wife seek a great amount of power. They will do anything to get it, including murder and other horrified crimes, making them criminals. Do they achieve their goal? Find out!
Review submitted by Atit.
All Your Base All Your Base Are Belong to Us
by Harold Goldberg
If you grew up with video games or just like to play them, then this is definitely the book for you! It gives you the amazing history of many famous video games and systems that changed our lives forever! 5/5 stars!
Review submitted by Dev.
Change of heart Change of Heart
by Shari Maurer
Athletic Emmi learns horrible news: her heart is failing. Throughout the story Emmi meets Abe, who already had heart surgery, and they instantly bond. Emmi goes through many tough times in her high school years.
Review submitted by Brandi.
Shug Shug
by Jenny Han
This book was about a girl named Anne Marie, and she likes Mark. But Mark likes Celia. Celia is Anne Marie’s older sister. Also, Anne Marie told her mom about Mark so the mom said try it out.
Review submitted by Kimberly.
homecoming Homecoming
by Cynthia Voigt
In Homecoming, Dicey, James, Maybeth, and Sammy are abandoned by their mother. They go all over the country searching for a loving home. I love this book because it shows really good friendship, motivation, and kindness.
Review submitted by Alice.
Kimmie66 Kimmie66
by Aaron Alexovich
It’s about a girl named Telly and her friend committed suicide and she’s trying to figure out why she did this and what was the point of it. At the end, Kimmie was still her friend and Telly was not mad at her.
Review submitted by Kaitlyn.
Tale Dark and Grimm A Tale Dark and Grimm
by Adam Gidwitz
The book was suspenseful, adventurous, and creative. There are dragons and enchanted things. There are freaky parts, like when Hansel and Gretel hide in a closet when there is screaming in the kitchen and a devil in the house.
Review submitted by Anthony.
Wednesday Wars The Wednesday Wars
by Gary Schmidt
If you don’t like Shakespeare, you might want to take a look at this. Holling thinks his teacher hates him, especially when his teacher makes him read Shakespeare outside of school.
Review submitted by Jenefer.
Beware Beware!
by R.L. Stine
It’s really scary especially when you read it at night. The slightest creek or something falling will make you jump.
Review submitted by Gabriella.
Between Mom and Jo Between Mom and Jo
by Julie Anne Peters
This book was well written and about how the main character struggles to face the cruelty of kids while having two moms. This book was exciting and thrilling. I highly recommend it.
Review submitted by Emma.

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By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on July 3, 2013 Categories: Fantasy, Fiction, GLBTQ, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads, Horror, Issues, Nonfiction, Realistic Fiction, Reviews By You

Inifinite Kung Fu by Kagan McLeod

Infinite Kung FuInfinite Kung Fu

by Kagan McLeod

If you are a fan of martial arts or kung fu movies, then you should read Infinite Kung Fu by Kagan McLeod.  Infinite Kung Fu is a collection of McLeod’s self published comics.  What McLeod has put together is a story that centers on main character, Lei Kung, who is the chosen one to defeat the evil emperor.  Lei Kung’s journey to attaining the skills to defeat the emperor is set against the backdrop of a world where technology is gone, people have returned back to the old ways, and zombies ravage the land.  Along the way he finds help and guidance from many, but the one who helps him the most is the Moog Joogular.  He is a smooth talking, butt kicking, super cool dude, and a great throw back character that is reminiscent of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and other African American martial artists that became popular in the 1960’s and 1970’s.  The Moog Joogular character is one of the biggest reasons you should read this book.  He is awesome!

In addition to some great characters, McLeod also really hit on some good points of martial arts and what practicing should mean to someone, through the character of Lei Kung. My favorite scene is when he is talking with Li Zhao over a meal. Lei Kung says, “With a basic knowledge and respect for all styles, one can always hope to counter any technique!” and “A kung fu instructor’s greatest accomplishment is to have his student surpass him. It’s a pity for some students their teachers keep their best techniques to themselves.”  Check out what that scene looks like (obviously Li Zhao does not like what Lei Kung has to say):

Infinite Kung Fu layout

I think this is a great message to send to those who love martial arts: patience and dedication pay off and martial art forms should be shared and not hidden away as some unattainable knowledge.  Infinite Kung Fu is an excellent read for any age.  Click here to find it in the Library!

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on April 23, 2013 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads

March Madness is upon us

March is the ultimate month to be a basketball fan!  If you can break yourself away from NCAA tournament, then check out some of these basketball themed books (click on the cover to find it in the Library!):

The Final Four

by Paul Volponi

YA VOLPONI, P.

Alternating chapters center on four different players on the two teams that meet in a semi-final game of the NCAA Final Four Tournament.

  Last Shot

by John Feinstein

YA MY FEINSTEIN, J.

Two eighth grade students win the opportunity to cover the NCAA Final Four first hand as journalists, but while reporting live at the tournament they uncover a scandal that involves blackmail.

  Game

by Walter Dean Myers

YA MYERS, W.

Drew is a senior living in Harlem and has dreams of making it in the NBA, but he has to learn to control his anger issues first.

  Boy21

by Matthew Quick

YA QUICK, M.

Two basketball teammates, one black and one white, form a connection through tutoring and find that they have a lot more in common than they had first thought.

  The Pick-Up Game: a Full Day of Full Court

YA SS PICK-UP

This collection of short stories focuses on different perspectives of one pick up game played on a hot day in July in New York City.

  Girl Got Game

by Shizuru Seino

YA GRAPH SEINO, S. V.1

This manga series centers on Kyo, whose father is determined to live out his NBA dreams through his daughter.  Her father signs her up for the boy’s basketball team and Kyo masquerades as a boy on the team to make her father happy.

  Basketball Slave

by Mark Johnson

YA 796.323 JOHNSON, A.

Andy Johnson’s son, Mark Johnson, tells his father’s story of how Andy became one of the original Harlem Globetrotters.

  In the Paint: Tattoos of the NBA and the Stories Behind Them

by Andrew Gottlieb

YA 796.323 GOTTLIEB, A.

This is a collection of high res photos of some of the more unique NBA tattoos and the first hand stories by the players about why they got them.

 

  When March Went Mad

by Seth Davis

796.3236 DAVIS, S.

Larry Bird and Magic Johnson are famous for one of the most well known basketball games in history: the 1979 NCAA Championship game between the Michigan State Spartans and the Indiana State Sycamores.  Davis retells the events that led up to the famous game.

  Longshot

by Lance Allred

796.323 ALLRED, L.

Lance Allred is the NBA’s first deaf player.  In this memoir he tells his story of growing up in a fundamentalist Mormon household, realizing his dream of being in the NBA, and how hard it was to get there.

  The Ultimate Book of March Madness

by Tom Hager

796.3236 HAGER, T.

This book includes a history of every NCAA tournament from 1930 to present and provides an analysis of the top 100 games played in the tournament.

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on March 7, 2013 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads, Mystery, Nonfiction, Realistic Fiction, Staff Pics

2013 Award Winning Books

This morning the American Library Association’s Young Adult division, YALSA, announced this year’s award winning books and audiobooks.  I was lucky to be at the Youth Media Awards ceremony, since I am in Seattle, WA, for the Midwinter Conference!  Let me tell you the award ceremony was very exciting and a lot of fun!  Check out a couple photos at the end of this post.  Click here to get to official press release of the winners.  Below is a list of the teen titles that won.  Just click on the title to see if you can find it at the Library!

 
Prinz Award for Excellence in YA Literature ?

Winner:  ?In Darkness by Nick Lake

Honor: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Honor: Dodger by Terry Pratchett

Honor: The White Bicycle by Beverly Brenna

 
Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award (Honoring a significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature)

Awarded to: Tamora Pierce

Click here to learn more about Tamora Pierce.  Pierce has written a few different book series, but to get started I suggest you check out her Song of the Lioness series or her Beka Cooper series at the Library!

 
YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

Winner: Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

Finalist: Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal

Finalist: Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 by Phillip Hoose

Finalist: Titanic: Voices from the Disaster by Deborah Hopkinson

Finalist: We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson

 
William C. Morris Award (Honoring a work by a first time author)

Winner: Seraphina by Rachel Hartman

Finalist: Wonder Show by Hannah Barnaby

Finalist: Love and Other Perishable Items by Laura Buzo

Finalist: After the Snow by S.D. Crockett

Finalist: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by emily m. danforth

 
Alex Awards (Given to ten books written for adults that have teen appeal)

Caring is Creepy by David Zimmerman

Girlchild by Tupelo Hassman

Juvenile in Justice by Richard Ross

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf

One Shot at Forever by Chris Ballard

Pure by Julianna Baggott

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple

 
The Odyssey Award (Awarded to the best audiobooks for children and/or young adults)

Winner: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, narrated by Kate Rudd

Honor: Artemis Fowl: the Last Guardian by Eoin Colfer, narrated by Nathaniel Parker

Honor: ?Ghost Knight by Cornelia Funke, narrated by Elliot Hill

Honor: Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama, narrated by Katherine Kellgren

 

Mildred L. Batchelder Award (Awarded for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States)

Winner: My Family for the War by Anne C. Voorhoeve, translated by Tammi Reichel

Honor: A Game for Swallows: to die, to leave, to return by Zeina Abirached, translated by Edward Gauvin

Honor: Son of a Gun by Anne de Graaf, translated by Anne de Graaf

 

?Pura Beleré Award (Presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work celebrates the Latino cultural experience)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

 
Schneider Family Book Awards (Honoring a work that emphasizes children or teens with a disability)

Teen: Somebody Please Tell Me Who I Am by Harry Mazer and Peter Lerangis

 
?Stonewall Book Awards for Children and Young Adult Literature (This award is sponsored by ALA’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Drama by Raina Telgemeier

Honor: Gone, Gone, Gone by Hannah Moskowitz

Honor: October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Lesléa Newman

Honor: Sparks: The Epic, Completely True Blue, (Almost) Holy Quest of Debbie by S.J. Adams

 

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award (This award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults)

Winner: Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney

Honor: No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

 

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on January 28, 2013 Categories: Award Winning, Fiction, GLBTQ, Graphic Novel, Nonfiction

Book Trailer of the Week– A Wrinkle in Time: the graphic novel

This week’s book trailer of the week is for the recent graphic novel adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time.  The original novel was first published by Madeline L’Engle in 1962.  After 50 years this novel has become a classic sci fi fantasy book for readers of all ages.  Hope Larson adapted this novel into the graphic format, and some of her other works include Chiggers and Mercury.  Check out the book trailer below and then click here to find the graphic novel in the Library!

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on December 7, 2012 Categories: Book Trailer, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

Teen Boat by Dave Roman and John Green

Teen Boat: the angst of being a teen–the thrill of being a boat!

by Dave Roman and John Green

Teen Boat is a collection of comics that follows a boy named Teen Boat, who is seemingly your average teen guy, but who has the unique ability to transform into a boat.  As you can imagine, this comic collection is filled with hilarious adventures where Teen Boat gets into trouble because of his unique ability.  One of the funniest escapades chronicles Teen Boat trying to get his driver’s license.  Teen Boat is not comfortable in cars (because, duh, he’s a boat), so he puts off getting his license.  However, he wants to impress a girl at school who is really into cars, so he decides to try and get his license.  He has to wear floaties when he starts to learn how to drive, though, because he is so scared.  Then, when he takes the test, he spills his instructors coffee.  The coffee spills into Teen Boat’s ear, which holds his nerve center for turning into the boat.  Since liquid has hit his Teen Boat nerve, he turns into a boat inside the car!  Teen Boat is now a boat with a car underneath him.  He looses control and crashes into a semi carrying a tanker of gas.  Is this the end of Teen Boat!?  You’ll have to pick up this laugh out loud comic to find out.

Writer, Dave Roman, and cartoonist, John Green, have created a very interesting and easy to read collection of comics that, I have to admit, I have not seen or heard anything like this before.  The style of the art of Teen Boat reminds me of Archie comics.  It is a traditional comic, thankfully in color, but Green adds to Roman’s sidesplitting, humorous writing by adding his own funny imagery.  Check out some of the art style of Teen Boat below.  Included at the end of this book is the description of the creation process between Roman and Green.  They both worked very closely on Teen Boat, and there was a lot of back and forth between the author and the cartoonist.  You can really tell how much they were both in sync when creating this comic.  Teen Boat is definitely a great read for those who like out there comics that are filled with humor and ridiculousness.  Click here to find Teen Boat in the Library!

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on November 20, 2012 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Funny, Graphic Novel, Staff Pics

The Plain Janes by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

The Plain Janes

by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

Jane was in the heart of Metro City when there was a terrorist attack.  Lucky to survive, Jane’s parents move to the suburbs for a more “safe” place to live.  In a new town and a new high school, Jane is not only alone, she is also bored by suburban life.  So, on her first day of school, Jane is surprised to find three other Janes who are all friends and eat lunch together.  Jane asks to join them and instantly finds friendship.  Each of the Janes has their own unique personalities and together they all just fit.  To fight the boredom of suburban life Jane rallies the other Janes to form P.L.A.I.N., or People Loving Art in Neighborhoods.  They create art installations all over their suburban town to challenge people’s everyday notions of what art can be.  Some residents like the art, however, there are those who are outraged and frightened of it and start calling the installations “art attacks”.   What does this mean for the Janes?  Do they continue their installations, risking arrest?  Or worse?

The Plain Janes is a great graphic novel for anyone who is interested in art and how it can challenge our everyday beliefs or thoughts.  It is also a good read for anyone who has felt like an outcast.  It really shows how you can take the things that make you unique, and instead of being negative about them, you embrace them and try and challenge people with your ideas.

Also, the art in The Plain Janes really matches the plot of the story.  The black and white drawings add to the drama of the of the terrorist attack, Jane’s first day of school, and the sneaking around when creating the art installations.  However, I do wish the art installations could have been in color!  The characters are portrayed very realistically, which helps to add the idea that this could be a true story. Check out a sample of the art below:

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on October 11, 2012 Categories: Art, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Realistic Fiction, Staff Pics

Astonishing X-Men: Gifted by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday

Astonishing X-Men: Gifted

by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday

If you’re like me, then you can’t get enough of X-Men.  Instead of going back and watching all the movies again, I suggest picking up Astonishing X-Men: Gifted by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday.  Yes, Joss Whedon is the guy that brought you The Avengers movie earlier this year, and is most famous for his TV show Buffy, the Vampire Slayer.  

The story of the first volume, Gifted, is this:  Professor X is on sabbatical and Jean Grey is dead.  Cyclops and Emma Frost are acting as heads of Xavier’s School.  Wolverine, Kitty Pryde, and Beast are joining the faculty and make up the new X-Men team.  Most of the story in Gifted is told through Kitty Pryde’s point of view.  News breaks of a possible cure for the mutant strain, while at the same time the X-Men encounter a new enemy–Ord.  But, the new cure and new enemy may be one in the same…

Before reading Gifted, I had not known much about Kitty Pryde (only that she was from Deerfield, IL!).  As soon as I got into the story, though, she definitely became my new favorite X-Men character!  The way that Whedon and Cassaday portrayed her made her a really relatable character.  I also really got into the storyline that developed with her and Colossus (Peter Rasputin) .  Also, there’s Lockheed, Kitty Pryde’s pet X-Dragon, and for that alone you’ll want to pick this book up!

The story had me hooked from the beginning but Cassaday’s artwork in this comic is also really well done.  It conveys the emotion of the action.  A lot of strips are done in single colored tones that fits the mood of what’s happening on the page.  One of the best examples of this is where Kitty sees Colossus (Peter Rasputin) for the first time after she believes him dead. All the strips are done in all red tones and are interlaced with black and white memories. It is really visually appealing.  Check it out:

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on September 17, 2012 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads, Staff Pics, Supernatural/Paranormal