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Teen Blog

March Madness is upon us

March is the ultimate month to be a basketball fan!  If you can break yourself away from NCAA tournament, then check out some of these basketball themed books (click on the cover to find it in the Library!):

The Final Four

by Paul Volponi

YA VOLPONI, P.

Alternating chapters center on four different players on the two teams that meet in a semi-final game of the NCAA Final Four Tournament.

  Last Shot

by John Feinstein

YA MY FEINSTEIN, J.

Two eighth grade students win the opportunity to cover the NCAA Final Four first hand as journalists, but while reporting live at the tournament they uncover a scandal that involves blackmail.

  Game

by Walter Dean Myers

YA MYERS, W.

Drew is a senior living in Harlem and has dreams of making it in the NBA, but he has to learn to control his anger issues first.

  Boy21

by Matthew Quick

YA QUICK, M.

Two basketball teammates, one black and one white, form a connection through tutoring and find that they have a lot more in common than they had first thought.

  The Pick-Up Game: a Full Day of Full Court

YA SS PICK-UP

This collection of short stories focuses on different perspectives of one pick up game played on a hot day in July in New York City.

  Girl Got Game

by Shizuru Seino

YA GRAPH SEINO, S. V.1

This manga series centers on Kyo, whose father is determined to live out his NBA dreams through his daughter.  Her father signs her up for the boy’s basketball team and Kyo masquerades as a boy on the team to make her father happy.

  Basketball Slave

by Mark Johnson

YA 796.323 JOHNSON, A.

Andy Johnson’s son, Mark Johnson, tells his father’s story of how Andy became one of the original Harlem Globetrotters.

  In the Paint: Tattoos of the NBA and the Stories Behind Them

by Andrew Gottlieb

YA 796.323 GOTTLIEB, A.

This is a collection of high res photos of some of the more unique NBA tattoos and the first hand stories by the players about why they got them.

 

  When March Went Mad

by Seth Davis

796.3236 DAVIS, S.

Larry Bird and Magic Johnson are famous for one of the most well known basketball games in history: the 1979 NCAA Championship game between the Michigan State Spartans and the Indiana State Sycamores.  Davis retells the events that led up to the famous game.

  Longshot

by Lance Allred

796.323 ALLRED, L.

Lance Allred is the NBA’s first deaf player.  In this memoir he tells his story of growing up in a fundamentalist Mormon household, realizing his dream of being in the NBA, and how hard it was to get there.

  The Ultimate Book of March Madness

by Tom Hager

796.3236 HAGER, T.

This book includes a history of every NCAA tournament from 1930 to present and provides an analysis of the top 100 games played in the tournament.

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on March 7, 2013 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads, Mystery, Nonfiction, Realistic Fiction, Staff Pics

2013 Award Winning Books

This morning the American Library Association’s Young Adult division, YALSA, announced this year’s award winning books and audiobooks.  I was lucky to be at the Youth Media Awards ceremony, since I am in Seattle, WA, for the Midwinter Conference!  Let me tell you the award ceremony was very exciting and a lot of fun!  Check out a couple photos at the end of this post.  Click here to get to official press release of the winners.  Below is a list of the teen titles that won.  Just click on the title to see if you can find it at the Library!

 
Prinz Award for Excellence in YA Literature 


Winner:  
In Darkness by Nick Lake

Honor: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Honor: Dodger by Terry Pratchett

Honor: The White Bicycle by Beverly Brenna

 
Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award (Honoring a significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature)

Awarded to: Tamora Pierce

Click here to learn more about Tamora Pierce.  Pierce has written a few different book series, but to get started I suggest you check out her Song of the Lioness series or her Beka Cooper series at the Library!

 
YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

Winner: Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

Finalist: Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal

Finalist: Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 by Phillip Hoose

Finalist: Titanic: Voices from the Disaster by Deborah Hopkinson

Finalist: We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson

 
William C. Morris Award (Honoring a work by a first time author)

Winner: Seraphina by Rachel Hartman

Finalist: Wonder Show by Hannah Barnaby

Finalist: Love and Other Perishable Items by Laura Buzo

Finalist: After the Snow by S.D. Crockett

Finalist: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by emily m. danforth

 
Alex Awards (Given to ten books written for adults that have teen appeal)

Caring is Creepy by David Zimmerman

Girlchild by Tupelo Hassman

Juvenile in Justice by Richard Ross

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf

One Shot at Forever by Chris Ballard

Pure by Julianna Baggott

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple

 
The Odyssey Award (Awarded to the best audiobooks for children and/or young adults)

Winner: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, narrated by Kate Rudd

Honor: Artemis Fowl: the Last Guardian by Eoin Colfer, narrated by Nathaniel Parker

Honor: 
Ghost Knight by Cornelia Funke, narrated by Elliot Hill

Honor: Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama, narrated by Katherine Kellgren

 

Mildred L. Batchelder Award (Awarded for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States)

Winner: My Family for the War by Anne C. Voorhoeve, translated by Tammi Reichel

Honor: A Game for Swallows: to die, to leave, to return by Zeina Abirached, translated by Edward Gauvin

Honor: Son of a Gun by Anne de Graaf, translated by Anne de Graaf

 


Pura Beleré Award (Presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work celebrates the Latino cultural experience)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

 
Schneider Family Book Awards (Honoring a work that emphasizes children or teens with a disability)

Teen: Somebody Please Tell Me Who I Am by Harry Mazer and Peter Lerangis

 

Stonewall Book Awards for Children and Young Adult Literature (This award is sponsored by ALA’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Drama by Raina Telgemeier

Honor: Gone, Gone, Gone by Hannah Moskowitz

Honor: October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Lesléa Newman

Honor: Sparks: The Epic, Completely True Blue, (Almost) Holy Quest of Debbie by S.J. Adams

 

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award (This award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults)

Winner: Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney

Honor: No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

 

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on January 28, 2013 Categories: Award Winning, Fiction, GLBTQ, Graphic Novel, Nonfiction

Book Trailer of the Week– A Wrinkle in Time: the graphic novel

This week’s book trailer of the week is for the recent graphic novel adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time.  The original novel was first published by Madeline L’Engle in 1962.  After 50 years this novel has become a classic sci fi fantasy book for readers of all ages.  Hope Larson adapted this novel into the graphic format, and some of her other works include Chiggers and Mercury.  Check out the book trailer below and then click here to find the graphic novel in the Library!

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on December 7, 2012 Categories: Book Trailer, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction

Teen Boat by Dave Roman and John Green

Teen Boat: the angst of being a teen–the thrill of being a boat!

by Dave Roman and John Green

Teen Boat is a collection of comics that follows a boy named Teen Boat, who is seemingly your average teen guy, but who has the unique ability to transform into a boat.  As you can imagine, this comic collection is filled with hilarious adventures where Teen Boat gets into trouble because of his unique ability.  One of the funniest escapades chronicles Teen Boat trying to get his driver’s license.  Teen Boat is not comfortable in cars (because, duh, he’s a boat), so he puts off getting his license.  However, he wants to impress a girl at school who is really into cars, so he decides to try and get his license.  He has to wear floaties when he starts to learn how to drive, though, because he is so scared.  Then, when he takes the test, he spills his instructors coffee.  The coffee spills into Teen Boat’s ear, which holds his nerve center for turning into the boat.  Since liquid has hit his Teen Boat nerve, he turns into a boat inside the car!  Teen Boat is now a boat with a car underneath him.  He looses control and crashes into a semi carrying a tanker of gas.  Is this the end of Teen Boat!?  You’ll have to pick up this laugh out loud comic to find out.

Writer, Dave Roman, and cartoonist, John Green, have created a very interesting and easy to read collection of comics that, I have to admit, I have not seen or heard anything like this before.  The style of the art of Teen Boat reminds me of Archie comics.  It is a traditional comic, thankfully in color, but Green adds to Roman’s sidesplitting, humorous writing by adding his own funny imagery.  Check out some of the art style of Teen Boat below.  Included at the end of this book is the description of the creation process between Roman and Green.  They both worked very closely on Teen Boat, and there was a lot of back and forth between the author and the cartoonist.  You can really tell how much they were both in sync when creating this comic.  Teen Boat is definitely a great read for those who like out there comics that are filled with humor and ridiculousness.  Click here to find Teen Boat in the Library!

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on November 20, 2012 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Funny, Graphic Novel, Staff Pics

The Plain Janes by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

The Plain Janes

by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

Jane was in the heart of Metro City when there was a terrorist attack.  Lucky to survive, Jane’s parents move to the suburbs for a more “safe” place to live.  In a new town and a new high school, Jane is not only alone, she is also bored by suburban life.  So, on her first day of school, Jane is surprised to find three other Janes who are all friends and eat lunch together.  Jane asks to join them and instantly finds friendship.  Each of the Janes has their own unique personalities and together they all just fit.  To fight the boredom of suburban life Jane rallies the other Janes to form P.L.A.I.N., or People Loving Art in Neighborhoods.  They create art installations all over their suburban town to challenge people’s everyday notions of what art can be.  Some residents like the art, however, there are those who are outraged and frightened of it and start calling the installations “art attacks”.   What does this mean for the Janes?  Do they continue their installations, risking arrest?  Or worse?

The Plain Janes is a great graphic novel for anyone who is interested in art and how it can challenge our everyday beliefs or thoughts.  It is also a good read for anyone who has felt like an outcast.  It really shows how you can take the things that make you unique, and instead of being negative about them, you embrace them and try and challenge people with your ideas.

Also, the art in The Plain Janes really matches the plot of the story.  The black and white drawings add to the drama of the of the terrorist attack, Jane’s first day of school, and the sneaking around when creating the art installations.  However, I do wish the art installations could have been in color!  The characters are portrayed very realistically, which helps to add the idea that this could be a true story. Check out a sample of the art below:

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on October 11, 2012 Categories: Art, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Realistic Fiction, Staff Pics

Astonishing X-Men: Gifted by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday

Astonishing X-Men: Gifted

by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday

If you’re like me, then you can’t get enough of X-Men.  Instead of going back and watching all the movies again, I suggest picking up Astonishing X-Men: Gifted by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday.  Yes, Joss Whedon is the guy that brought you The Avengers movie earlier this year, and is most famous for his TV show Buffy, the Vampire Slayer.  

The story of the first volume, Gifted, is this:  Professor X is on sabbatical and Jean Grey is dead.  Cyclops and Emma Frost are acting as heads of Xavier’s School.  Wolverine, Kitty Pryde, and Beast are joining the faculty and make up the new X-Men team.  Most of the story in Gifted is told through Kitty Pryde’s point of view.  News breaks of a possible cure for the mutant strain, while at the same time the X-Men encounter a new enemy–Ord.  But, the new cure and new enemy may be one in the same…

Before reading Gifted, I had not known much about Kitty Pryde (only that she was from Deerfield, IL!).  As soon as I got into the story, though, she definitely became my new favorite X-Men character!  The way that Whedon and Cassaday portrayed her made her a really relatable character.  I also really got into the storyline that developed with her and Colossus (Peter Rasputin) .  Also, there’s Lockheed, Kitty Pryde’s pet X-Dragon, and for that alone you’ll want to pick this book up!

The story had me hooked from the beginning but Cassaday’s artwork in this comic is also really well done.  It conveys the emotion of the action.  A lot of strips are done in single colored tones that fits the mood of what’s happening on the page.  One of the best examples of this is where Kitty sees Colossus (Peter Rasputin) for the first time after she believes him dead. All the strips are done in all red tones and are interlaced with black and white memories. It is really visually appealing.  Check it out:

 

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on September 17, 2012 Categories: Action/Adventure, Fiction, Graphic Novel, Guys Reads, Staff Pics, Supernatural/Paranormal

Friends With Boys by Faith Erin Hicks

Friends With Boys

by Faith Erin Hicks

If you like quirky graphic novels with a touch of supernatural, then you’ll love Friends With Boys.  Not only is the artwork of Friends With Boys really well done, the story is also really interesting and quietly captivating.  It centers on Maggie who is about to enter high school after being home-schooled by her mother.  She is the youngest in her family with three older brothers, and their mother has just left.  Maggie has always relied on her brothers, to be her friends and to do stuff with. However, now that she is in high school, her brothers cannot be there for her, and Maggie has to make new friends to survive.  Maggie is doing her best in trying to deal with her mom leaving, even with the huge adjustment of attending a public high school, and the ghost that has followed her throughout her life is not helping things… 

According to her website, Faith Erin Hicks says that she wrote this graphic novel with a little basis in her own life experiences.  I always find it cool when an author uses their own experiences to influence their work.  Read more about what real life experiences Faith Erin Hicks used in this graphic novel by clicking here.  This book is not all drama, though, it is also hilarious!  Especially the relationship between Maggie’s twin brothers Lloyd and Zander.   Check out some of the artwork from Friends With Boys below:

It is simple black and white drawings, but I really like the style.  The characters are realistic portrayals, and I love the styling of all the characters–I feel like I can picture what these characters would look like in real life and I also love that each character has a distinct style that stays consistent through the whole book.  Finally, I really love the drama that Faith Erin Hicks can create with simple black and white drawings, check out this example (one of my favorites):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to find Friends With Boys at the Library!

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on July 11, 2012 Categories: Fiction, Graphic Novel, High School, Staff Pics

Saturn Apartments Vol 1 by Hisae Iwaoka

Saturan Apartments Book Cover

Saturn Apartments

by Hisae Iwaoka

If you want to dip your toe into the vast pool of Manga out there, then a good place to start is Saturn Apartments.  Many years in the future, Mitsu has just joined the window’s washers guild, which takes care of cleaning the multilevel glass ring 35 kilometers above the earth that everyone now lives in.  Everyone lives in this glass enclosed world because Earth has been deemed environmentally protected.  This new world status isn’t measured by how big your house is, it’s how high up in the ring structure your apartment is located.  Now Mitsu has taken over the window washing position after his father tragically died on the job under questionable circumstances.  As he begins his new job, Mitsu gains a new view of his world, which begins to unlock secrets not just in his life, but in others’ too.

By MPPL on February 27, 2012 Categories: Fiction, Graphic Novel, Science Fiction, Staff Pics

2011 Cybils announced yesterday!

Yesterday, the 2011 Cybils were announced.  The Cybils are the children’s and young adult bloggers literary awards.  According to their website, “instead of telling kids what we think they should be reading, we take a look at what they already are reading (or likely will read) — and then pick out the best of them.”  Check out the teen titles that won below and click on the cover or the title link to find them in the Library!

 

Young Adult Fiction Winner

Stupid Fast by Geoff Herbach

Just before his sixteenth birthday, Felton Reinstein has a sudden growth spurt that turns him from a small, jumpy, picked-on boy with the nickname of “Squirrel Nut” to a powerful athlete, leading to new friends, his first love, and the courage to confront his family’s problems.

 

 

 

 

Fantasy and Science Fiction Winner

Blood Red Road by Moira Young

In a distant future, eighteen-year-old Lugh is kidnapped, and while his twin sister Saba and nine-year-old Emmi are trailing him across bleak Sandsea they are captured, too, and taken to brutal Hopetown, where Saba is forced to be a cage fighter until new friends help plan an escape.

 

 

 

 

Graphic Novel Winner

Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Anya, embarrassed by her Russian immigrant family and self-conscious about her body, has given up on fitting in at school but falling down a well and making friends with the ghost there just may be worse.

 

 

 

 

Poetry Winner

Requiem: Poems of the Terezin Ghetto by Paul B. Janeczko

Presents a collection of poetry inspired by the history of the people in the Terezín concentration camp during the holocaust.

By Colleen, Teen Services Librarian on February 15, 2012 Categories: Award Winning, Fiction, Graphic Novel