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10 South Emerson, Mount Prospect, IL 60056 | 847/253-5675
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Archive for July, 2014

Skunked!

In case you hadn’t noticed (lucky you!) it’s skunk season! Removing skunk scent can be difficult because the oily compound responsible for the odor is not water soluble. In suburbia, the skunk’s prime target seems to be our dogs – mine got sprayed three times last year! Here are some tips from Carriage Hill Kennel in Glenview if your dog gets “skunked.”

1. Keep the dog outside. Most dogs seem to get sprayed in the face and the first thing they do is rub it all over your bed (or other furniture) and it’s very difficult to get the smell out of your house. For the same reason, put on old clothes and use old towels during the cleanup. It’s easier just to throw them away!

2. Mix 1 quart 3% hydrogen peroxide, ¼ cup baking soda, and 2 Tablespoons of dishwashing liquid (Dawn works best.) Do not wet dog down before applying this solution. Pour mixture over the dog and let it sit for 10-15 minutes (be careful not to get it in the dog’s eyes.) Rinse the dog thoroughly and let dry in the sun if possible.

3. Don’t mix this solution before hand and store it in a container as it could possibly explode. There are also products at pet stores specifically for removing skunk odor.

4. If you prefer to take your dog to a groomer for the cleanup, let the groomer know the situation before you drop your pet off. Many times, there is a separate grooming area for “skunked” dogs as they do not want the smell to permeate their business.

5. If you discover skunks have taken up residence on your property – usually in wood piles or under decks or stoops – you will need to call a private company for removal. The Village of Mount Prospect does not remove any wild animals.

Good luck!

By JoR on July 11, 2014 Categories: Uncategorized

Flying the Flag – the right way!

It’s that time of year, when Old Glory is proudly displayed.  The United States Flag is one of the most visible and important symbols of our country and the United States Flag Code spells out proper use of the flag.

From a staff, the union (the blue field) should be at the peak, unless the flag is being flown at half-staff.  No other flag should be placed above or to the right of the American flag. The flag can also be displayed vertically, hanging flat so the folds fall free. The union should be uppermost to the flag’s own right (the observer’s left.)

Customarily, the flag is flown from sunrise to sunset, although it may be flown 24 hours a day if properly illuminated during night hours.  Proper illumination is a light specifically for the flag (preferred) or a light source in the area that allows the flag to be identifiable. The flag should not be flown in inclement weather, unless it is made of all-weather material (many are.)

The flag should not touch the ground or be used for draping or decoration. No part of the flag should be used as a costume, in clothing, or for advertising purposes.  Lapel pins are allowed and should always be worn on the left near the heart.

When a flag becomes too worn to display, it should be respectfully disposed of, preferably by burning.  American Legion Post 36 and VFW Post 2992 host an annual Flag Day (June 14) ceremonial burning of worn flags. For more information on displaying the flag, visit the American Legion website at http://www.legion.org/flag/code .

By JoR on Categories: Uncategorized

Summertime tips for financial literacy

Summer is finally here, and between planning your holidays and wondering when you should turn on the AC, I bet the last thing you’re thinking about is FINANCIAL LITERACY! However, this is actually the BEST time to start figuring out a plan to keep your life cruising along while planning for the future (ok, actually ANYTIME  is a perfect time to work on financial literacy, but why not start now anyway?).

There are many resources that can help, one of which is Feedthepig.org. Assembled by the American Institute of CPAs (and they oughta know!), Feedthepig.org is a great site that offers tips and strategies for putting together a financial plan, including how to create a budget, review your expenses, manage saving, retirement, and student loan debt, and much more. It’s easy to use and fairly straightforward—the real trick, as always, is ACTUALLY DOING IT. Mint.com is another helpful site. Mint pulls all your financial accounts into one place. Set a budget, track your goals, stay on top of your finances. See what’s happening with all your accounts – checking, savings, investments, retirement – at any moment of the day. There’s even a free mobile app to help you stay connected on-the-go. If you’re a student fresh out of college and looking at a mountain (or a molehill) of student loans, you should check out YouCanDealWithIt.com. YouCanDealWithIt.com provides practical and easy-to-understand advice on how to deal with common financial situations facing today’s college students and recent graduates, such as: understanding student aid, including the repayment of student loans, learning effective money management, including setting a budget, and dealing with the dangers of credit cards while enjoying the benefits. In addition to being a resource for students, this website also provides information and tools for parents and college financial aid administrators to help them communicate accurate and effective financial advice to their prospective students, current students, and graduates. So bite the bullet and get started on the road toward better financial literacy today—it may be tough at first, but you’ll be glad you did!

By joecollier on July 1, 2014 Categories: Consumer, Credit Cards, Economic, Finance