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Notes from Storytime

Props

The Best Pet EverReading and telling stories to your child is very important. But don’t just stop there! It is also important that children understand what is going on in the story. This is known as narrative skills, and it will help your children all throughout their lives as they read and learn. During a story, ask your child about what is going on in the story and/or the pictures. After reading, help your child retell the story. Using props from around the house can be a fun way to do that.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

 

By eemerick on September 16, 2013 Categories: Narrative

Under My Hood I Have a Hat

Under My Hood I Have a HatEven in a fairly simple story like Under My Hood I Have a Hat by Karla Kuskin, there are words that we don’t use in everyday conversation. Even if you don’t talk about the meaning of all these words as you read, your child hears the words in the story and gets an idea of what they mean from hearing the story and from the pictures. This helps build vocabulary.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By MPPL on September 2, 2013 Categories: Vocabulary

Under My Hood I Have a Hat

Under My Hood I Have a HatEven in a fairly simple story like Under My Hood I Have a Hat by Karla Kuskin, there are words that we don’t use in everyday conversation. Even if you don’t talk about the meaning of all these words as you read, your child hears the words in the story and gets an idea of what they mean from hearing the story and from the pictures. This helps build vocabulary.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on Categories: Vocabulary

Peek-a-boo!

Sneak-a-peek-a-boo! Where's My Bear?Books with textures, flaps, and pop-ups are especially fun for babies. If they enjoyed it the first time you read it, read it again! Your enthusiasm while reading will help maintain their attention and make reading a truly special time for everyone!

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

 

By eemerick on August 19, 2013 Categories: Print Motivation

Monkey and Me

Monkey and MeShowing children letters based on subjects they like follows their interest. They are more likely to remember the letter that way than if you drill them. The book Monkey and Me by Emily Gravett has a monkey on the cover, an animal that is usually popular among children. Point out the letter “M” and say its name and sound.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

By MPPL on August 5, 2013 Categories: Letter Knowledge

Monkey and Me

Monkey and MeShowing children letters based on subjects they like follows their interest. They are more likely to remember the letter that way than if you drill them. The book Monkey and Me by Emily Gravett has a monkey on the cover, an animal that is usually popular among children. Point out the letter “M” and say its name and sound.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

By eemerick on Categories: Letter Knowledge

Bright Stanley

Bright StanleyPrint awareness is learning that print has meaning and that words represent real things. Children like books that have pictures of objects that are familiar to them. In the book Bright Stanley by Matt Buckingham, while Stanley may swim in the ocean, he is a fish, something that many children are familiar with. When you read this book, talk about fish and where you see them in real like (like in the fish tank at the Library). By doing this, you are showing children that pictures represent real things.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

By MPPL on July 22, 2013 Categories: Print Awareness

Bright Stanley

Bright StanleyPrint awareness is learning that print has meaning and that words represent real things. Children like books that have pictures of objects that are familiar to them. In the book Bright Stanley by Matt Buckingham, while Stanley may swim in the ocean, he is a fish, something that many children are familiar with. When you read this book, talk about fish and where you see them in real like (like in the fish tank at the Library). By doing this, you are showing children that pictures represent real things.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

By eemerick on Categories: Print Awareness

Go on a Nature Walk

I See SummerDeveloping narrative skills will help children be ready to read. To get your children talking, read the book I See Summer by Charles Ghigna and then go on a nature walk with them. Have them point out all the things they are seeing while walking. Then, Before bedtime, have them recollect what they saw earlier. They can even draw a picture of their nature walk with you!

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

 

By eemerick on July 8, 2013 Categories: Narrative

Stinky Cake by Carole Peterson

Stinky CakeRhymes are fun to sing and say with your child. Singing rhymes also helps your child hear words being broken up into smaller sounds, which is part of phonological awareness. Try singing “Icky Sticky and Ooey Gooey” from the CD Stinky Cake by Carole Peterson. This song lets you guess the rhyming word coming up in the song. You can even try to make up new verses at home just by finding words that rhyme!

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

 

By MPPL on June 24, 2013 Categories: Phonological Awareness