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Notes from Storytime

Recognizing Numbers

Clock

Print awareness is recognizing that print has meaning. This can mean that children are able to identify words or numbers, even if they can’t read them or don’t know what they mean. You can use environmental print, or words that are part of our everyday life, to promote print awareness. Clocks are a great example of environmental print!

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

 

By eemerick on October 6, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

Print Awareness

Tops and BottomsYoung children can begin to learn that a book must be held a certain way in order to understand the print (and to follow the pictures). In the book Tops and Bottoms by Janet Stevens, the text of the story requires the reader to hold the book completely sideways!

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Library Assistant

By eemerick on July 28, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

The Cow Loves Cookies

The Cow Loves CookiesHelp your child develop print awareness by pointing to the repeating phrase, “the cow loves cookies,” every time you see it in the story by Karma Wilson. This helps your child see the relationship between written and spoken words.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By eemerick on June 2, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

Repeat After Me

Where Does the Butterfly Go When It Rains?When reading picture books to children, it is important to show them that you are reading the words in the book and not pictures. One way to do this is by running your finger under the title and/or the repeated phrases in a book. For example, in the book Where Does the Butterfly Go When It Rains? by May Garelick, the title phrase is repeated every few pages. Point to this phrase and have your child say it with you. This will help your child become more aware of the print in the book.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

 

By eemerick on April 28, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

A Splendid Friend, Indeed

A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Suzanne BloomIn A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Suzanne Bloom, writing is part of the story. Pointing out print and the uses of writing will help your child become aware that print is all around us. That knowledge is part of the early literacy skill called print awareness.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

By MPPL on February 3, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

A Splendid Friend, Indeed

A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Suzanne BloomIn A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Suzanne Bloom, writing is part of the story. Pointing out print and the uses of writing will help your child become aware that print is all around us. That knowledge is part of the early literacy skill called print awareness.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

By eemerick on Categories: Print Awareness

Spot Goes to a Party

Spot Goes to a PartyIn the book Spot Goes to a Party by Eric Hill, you can tell when the character is talking because it is written in a speech bubble. Point to the words they are saying as you read them. This helps your child understand that you are reading the text and helps develop print awareness.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

By MPPL on October 28, 2013 Categories: Print Awareness

Spot Goes to a Party

Spot Goes to a PartyIn the book Spot Goes to a Party by Eric Hill, you can tell when the character is talking because it is written in a speech bubble. Point to the words they are saying as you read them. This helps your child understand that you are reading the text and helps develop print awareness.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

By eemerick on Categories: Print Awareness

Bright Stanley

Bright StanleyPrint awareness is learning that print has meaning and that words represent real things. Children like books that have pictures of objects that are familiar to them. In the book Bright Stanley by Matt Buckingham, while Stanley may swim in the ocean, he is a fish, something that many children are familiar with. When you read this book, talk about fish and where you see them in real like (like in the fish tank at the Library). By doing this, you are showing children that pictures represent real things.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

By eemerick on July 22, 2013 Categories: Print Awareness

Bright Stanley

Bright StanleyPrint awareness is learning that print has meaning and that words represent real things. Children like books that have pictures of objects that are familiar to them. In the book Bright Stanley by Matt Buckingham, while Stanley may swim in the ocean, he is a fish, something that many children are familiar with. When you read this book, talk about fish and where you see them in real like (like in the fish tank at the Library). By doing this, you are showing children that pictures represent real things.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

By MPPL on Categories: Print Awareness