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Notes from Storytime

I Could Be, You Could Be

I Could Be, You Could BeI Could Be, You Could Be by Karen Owen will help spark your child’s imagination as it talks about becoming various people and things, from astronauts to elephants. This kind of role play helps your child develop the narrative skill. In the back of the book there are ideas about how to create masks and other items for make-believe play.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By eemerick on November 26, 2012 Categories: Narrative

I Could Be, You Could Be

I Could Be, You Could BeI Could Be, You Could Be by Karen Owen will help spark your child’s imagination as it talks about becoming various people and things, from astronauts to elephants. This kind of role play helps your child develop the narrative skill. In the back of the book there are ideas about how to create masks and other items for make-believe play.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By MPPL on Categories: Narrative

Overboard!

Overboard!One way to teach your child narrative skill is to read a book, such as Overboard! by Sarah Weeks, that has a repetitive refrain. If your child is talking, you might even want to have him or her say the refrain “overboard” with you as you read.

–Tip by Mary S., Head of Youth Services

By eemerick on September 3, 2012 Categories: Narrative

Overboard!

Overboard!One way to teach your child narrative skill is to read a book, such as Overboard! by Sarah Weeks, that has a repetitive refrain. If your child is talking, you might even want to have him or her say the refrain “overboard” with you as you read.

–Tip by Mary S., Head of Youth Services

By MPPL on Categories: Narrative

Describe Things

All Sorts of ClothesPart of narrative skills is being able to describe things. For example, when you talk about the colors and shapes and textures of your child’s clothing, or what kinds of things your child’s toys do, it gives your child new words. Embellishing your descriptions of events of the day may help children recall an experience and the words associated with it. Researchers say participating in these activities will make it easier for your child when it comes time for formal reading instruction.

–Tip by Jan P., Preschool/Childcare Liaison

By eemerick on June 25, 2012 Categories: Narrative

Retelling Stories

All of MeWhen we talk about a story after reading it, we are helping children to remember what they heard. Using props to retell a story after you’ve read it can be a fun way for children to remember and internalize stories. You can use puppets or props around the house to act out a story. This strengthens comprehension and narrative, two skills that are important for success when your child is learning to read, and throughout his or her education.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

By eemerick on April 17, 2012 Categories: Narrative

Story Structure

Red, Red, RedYou are your child’s first teacher. Researchers have noted that there are six early literacy skills that you can help your child with before they actually learn to read—one of which is narrative, the ability to describe events and tell stories. Stories like Red, Red, Red by Valeri Gorbachev have a certain structure with a beginning, middle, and an end. By exposing your children to storybooks, you help them become familiar with the way language is written. Not only are storybooks fun to share, but being familiar with their structure will also help your child know what to expect when they begin to read stories themselves.

–Tip by Brad J., Youth Technology Librarian

By eemerick on February 6, 2012 Categories: Narrative

Leaf Man

Leaf Man

Practice the narrative skill with your child by reading the book Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert and creating your own leaf man. Once you have created him, talk about what adventures he might have and write them down so you can retell them again later.

  –Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By MPPL on November 15, 2011 Categories: Narrative

Leaf Man

Leaf Man

Practice the narrative skill with your child by reading the book Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert and creating your own leaf man. Once you have created him, talk about what adventures he might have and write them down so you can retell them again later.

  –Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By Michelle on Categories: Narrative

Talking With Your Child

All By MyselfTalk about your day with your child. Discuss what you did first, next, and last, leading up to bedtime. Stories, like daily life, have a sequence of events. This discussion helps to foster narrative skills as well as comprehension and sequencing skills.

–Tip by Carol C., Youth Programming Assistant

By MPPL on August 16, 2011 Categories: Narrative