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Notes from Storytime

Shape Up!

ShapesYoung children learn through their senses, and they learn best by doing. When children are learning to read, it is helpful to recognize letters and be able to tell the difference between them. Younger children will start by learning the difference between shapes. One way to help children do this is by moving their arms and bodies into shapes and letters. While doing this, you can also talk about the differences between shapes, or sounds, in the case of letters.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

By eemerick on May 18, 2015 Categories: Letter Knowledge

Too Tall Houses by Gianna Marino

Too Tall HousesIn this story, Rabbit and Owl have a problem. Let’s find out what the problem is and if they are able to solve it.

Children enjoy talking about what they have read. It is a good way to engage them in conversation and for them to remember the story they have read. Ask your child questions before, during, and after reading. The ability to retell a story is an important skill to learn before going to school.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on May 4, 2015 Categories: Narrative

Dragon’s Extraordinary Egg by Debi Gliori

Dragon's Extraordinary EggOne way to build vocabulary is to introduce new words prior to reading a book with those words. It can be as simple as saying the word and explaining what it means before opening the book. This is a great way to increase your child’s vocabulary since children are more likely to remember certain words if they are used, heard, and spoken more than once. Before reading this book, talk about the title and what the word “extraordinary” means.

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

By eemerick on April 20, 2015 Categories: Vocabulary

All Through the Town

Grocery StoreYou can practice print awareness anywhere, even if you don’t have a book. Name the letters and the sounds on stop signs or billboards you see while driving, food labels at the grocery store, and other print you run across throughout the day. Even though children may not be able to recognize the letters or words yet, they are still learning to recognize the shape or symbol. This will help them to understand that print has meaning and that it is all around us.

–Tip by Claire Bartlett, Youth Outreach Coordinator

By eemerick on April 6, 2015 Categories: Print Awareness

Alphabet Box Game

Alphabet Box GameMaking learning about the alphabet fun. Play this fun alphabet game with your child. Find a shoe box, mark it with a letter of the alphabet, and search with your child to find objects that begin with that letter to put inside the box.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

 

By eemerick on March 23, 2015 Categories: Letter Knowledge

Tweet! Tweet!

BirdsPractice telling and retelling stories. Try looking at some of the birds outside and talk with your child about what they are doing and what they look like. Then try making up stories about the birds in your neighborhood. This will help your child later to talk about what is happening in books.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

 

By eemerick on March 9, 2015 Categories: Narrative

It’s Party Time!

Spot's Birthday PartyDevelop children’s print motivation by getting them excited about books. Through your enthusiasm and storytelling, children will be motivated to discover books with you and on their own. Have fun exploring Spot’s Birthday Party by Eric Hill with its entertaining flaps and playful pictures.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

By eemerick on February 23, 2015 Categories: Print Motivation

What Rhymes With “Snow?”

Snow

Take advantage of every opportunity to rhyme with your children even if the book does not have rhyming text. Pick out a word and brainstorm some rhyming words together. For instance, this book by Manya Stojic has just one word for a title: Snow. Can you think of some words that rhyme with “snow?”

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By eemerick on February 16, 2015 Categories: Phonological Awareness

I Can Make Letters

101 Rhythm Instrument Activities for Young ChildrenLetter knowledge means knowing that letters are different from each other and that letters relate to sounds. Children learn through their senses, and they learn best by doing. Practice how different letters look, sound, and feel by making them out of things around the house—crayons, food, popsicle sticks, yarn, or even your bodies! Sing this song after each letter you make.

London Bridge Letters (to the tune of “London Bridges”)
I can make the letter __,
Letter __, letter ___,
I can make the letter __,
With my (crayons, sticks, yarn, body).

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on January 12, 2015 Categories: Letter Knowledge

Bubbles, Bubbles

Bubbles, BubblesDid you know that when children play with bubbles, they are learning visual tracking skills that help them follow print on a page? What a fun way to learn!

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

By eemerick on December 29, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness