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Notes from Storytime

Print Awareness

Tops and BottomsYoung children can begin to learn that a book must be held a certain way in order to understand the print (and to follow the pictures). In the book Tops and Bottoms by Janet Stevens, the text of the story requires the reader to hold the book completely sideways!
–Tip by Amy S., Youth Library Assistant

By eemerick on July 28, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

Books are Conversation Starters

I Like BugsOnce in a while, instead of reading the text in a board book as it is written, use the text in the book as a conversation starter. Adding new words that your child might not otherwise hear can be a great way to help his or her vocabulary grow. Good readers know lots of words!
–Tip by Jan P., Preschool/Childcare Liaison

By eemerick on July 17, 2014 Categories: Vocabulary

Pat-a-Cake

Pat-a-CakeSongs like “Pat-a-Cake” not only tell a story, they describe a sequence of events. Your baby hears the words and relates them to the actions. Like books, songs are a fun way to develop your little one’s expressive language and narrative skills.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

By eemerick on June 30, 2014 Categories: Narrative

Letter Play

My Teacher Can Teach-- Anyone!Alphabet books are one way to help children become aware of letters. Researchers have noted one of the six areas of early literacy as letter knowledge, which means recognizing letters, being able to name the letters, and knowing that each letter has its own sound. The book, My Teacher Can Teach–Anyone! by W. Nikola-Lisa, shows people doing jobs from A to Z. After each page, talk with your child about the letter name and sound. Remember that you do not need to read alphabet books from cover to cover; try beginning with your child’s favorite letters instead, like the first letter in his or her name.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on June 16, 2014 Categories: Letter Knowledge

The Cow Loves Cookies

The Cow Loves CookiesHelp your child develop print awareness by pointing to the repeating phrase, “the cow loves cookies,” every time you see it in the story by Karma Wilson. This helps your child see the relationship between written and spoken words.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

By eemerick on June 2, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

Print Motivation

Chicky Chicky Chook Chook

By making books and their stories fun, you are helping to motivate your child to want more. Encourage your child to play along with the story. For example, you and your child can make animal sounds, act out the motions, or your child may enjoy holding a puppet or stuffed animal as you read.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

By eemerick on May 19, 2014 Categories: Print Motivation

Nursery Rhymes

This Little PiggyRhymes are a fun way to build phonological awareness, the ability to hear the small sounds in words. Pick a favorite nursery rhyme such as “This Little Piggy” to share with your child.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

 

By eemerick on May 12, 2014 Categories: Phonological Awareness

Repeat After Me

Where Does the Butterfly Go When It Rains?When reading picture books to children, it is important to show them that you are reading the words in the book and not pictures. One way to do this is by running your finger under the title and/or the repeated phrases in a book. For example, in the book Where Does the Butterfly Go When It Rains? by May Garelick, the title phrase is repeated every few pages. Point to this phrase and have your child say it with you. This will help your child become more aware of the print in the book.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

 

By eemerick on April 28, 2014 Categories: Print Awareness

The Human Alphabet

 

The Human AlphabetAt home, have silly fun trying to spell short words using only your body! This activity introduces the concept that words are made up of letters, and we use only 26 letters to form many different words. Take a look at the picture book The Human Alphabet by Pilobolus and see the entire alphabet created only by human bodies!

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Library Assistant

 

By eemerick on April 14, 2014 Categories: Letter Knowledge

The Order of Things

Head, Shoulders, Knees, and ToesActivities that follow a pattern or sequence help children to develop narrative skills because they must remember the order in which they happened. After doing a rhyme like “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes,” ask your child what body part we touched first, second, and so on. Try this with other activities you do throughout the day that have a sequence, such as the steps you take to get to the Library.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

 

By eemerick on March 31, 2014 Categories: Narrative