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Notes from Storytime

Monster Talk

Monster, be Good!As you read Monster, Be Good! by Natalie Marshall, have your child tell the monster the phrase after you read it. Then when you are done, ask some questions like, “What would you say if someone gave you a present?” or “What do you say if you accidentally bump into someone?” When you ask your child questions, give them extra time to think and to answer you. Talking back and forth uses different parts of the brain, so it takes time for children to form their responses. This is a fun way to learn manners and narrative skills!

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Librarian

By eemerick on July 27, 2015 Categories: Narrative

Learning New Words

Quick as a CricketYou can use books to help expand your child’s vocabulary. Quick as a Cricket by Audrey Wood has many descriptive words that your child may not have heard before. You can help your child understand the meaning by looking at the pictures as well as the word’s opposite. You don’t need to stop to explain all of the words, but you may discuss a few of them as you read by giving examples of similar words or studying the pictures for clues about the word’s meaning.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on July 13, 2015 Categories: Vocabulary

I Spy…

I Spy on the FarmTo help your child develop the early literacy skill of print awareness, try playing this fun “I Spy” game using I Spy on the Farm by Edward Gibbs. Trace the word in bold with your finger and ask children what color they see. This will help your child associate the color with its written word.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

By eemerick on June 29, 2015 Categories: Print Awareness

Wiggle Waggle

Wiggle WagglePhonological awareness involves being able to break words down into parts. In Wiggle Waggle by Jonathan London, you’ll have fun with onomatopoeia—the name for words (many times silly ones) that sound like what they describe—like CLOMP or BOING! You may stretch the sounds in some of these words, or say them quickly!

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

By eemerick on June 15, 2015 Categories: Phonological Awareness

Lift-the-flap Fun

Opposnakes

Getting kids excited about books and reading is the focus of the early literacy skill called print motivation. With the fun flaps featured in Opposnakes by Salina Yoon, children can guess the opposites while having fun opening the flaps. Don’t forget to read it again and again as children love repetition, and they will learn the storyline and “read” it back to YOU!

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

By eemerick on June 1, 2015 Categories: Print Motivation

Shape Up!

ShapesYoung children learn through their senses, and they learn best by doing. When children are learning to read, it is helpful to recognize letters and be able to tell the difference between them. Younger children will start by learning the difference between shapes. One way to help children do this is by moving their arms and bodies into shapes and letters. While doing this, you can also talk about the differences between shapes, or sounds, in the case of letters.

–Tip by Claire B., Youth Outreach Coordinator

By eemerick on May 18, 2015 Categories: Letter Knowledge

Too Tall Houses by Gianna Marino

Too Tall HousesIn this story, Rabbit and Owl have a problem. Let’s find out what the problem is and if they are able to solve it.

Children enjoy talking about what they have read. It is a good way to engage them in conversation and for them to remember the story they have read. Ask your child questions before, during, and after reading. The ability to retell a story is an important skill to learn before going to school.

–Tip by Erin E., Youth Programming Coordinator

By eemerick on May 4, 2015 Categories: Narrative

Dragon’s Extraordinary Egg by Debi Gliori

Dragon's Extraordinary EggOne way to build vocabulary is to introduce new words prior to reading a book with those words. It can be as simple as saying the word and explaining what it means before opening the book. This is a great way to increase your child’s vocabulary since children are more likely to remember certain words if they are used, heard, and spoken more than once. Before reading this book, talk about the title and what the word “extraordinary” means.

–Tip by Amy S., Youth Programming Assistant

By eemerick on April 20, 2015 Categories: Vocabulary

All Through the Town

Grocery StoreYou can practice print awareness anywhere, even if you don’t have a book. Name the letters and the sounds on stop signs or billboards you see while driving, food labels at the grocery store, and other print you run across throughout the day. Even though children may not be able to recognize the letters or words yet, they are still learning to recognize the shape or symbol. This will help them to understand that print has meaning and that it is all around us.

–Tip by Claire Bartlett, Youth Outreach Coordinator

By eemerick on April 6, 2015 Categories: Print Awareness

Alphabet Box Game

Alphabet Box GameMaking learning about the alphabet fun. Play this fun alphabet game with your child. Find a shoe box, mark it with a letter of the alphabet, and search with your child to find objects that begin with that letter to put inside the box.

–Tip by Mary S., Youth Services Department Head

 

By eemerick on March 23, 2015 Categories: Letter Knowledge