Notes from Story Time Category: Print Motivation

Read and Repeat!

Choosing excitingBark, George books or songs that repeat words is an easy way to keep a child’s interest. In a favorite story with repeating words, your child will know to expect them and look forward to saying (or shouting) them with you!

–Tip by Amy M., Youth Programming Assistant

Repeat After Me

Print motivation is the enjoyment of books and reading. The book Night, Circus by Mark Corcoran repeats the phrase, “’Night,” so that the narrator can say goodnight to every member of the circus. While reading this book, have your child say “’Night” to all the members of the circus. This will help your child stay involved in the book and is a way to support print motivation.
–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

Lift-the-flap Fun

Opposnakes

Getting kids excited about books and reading is the focus of the early literacy skill called print motivation. With the fun flaps featured in Opposnakes by Salina Yoon, children can guess the opposites while having fun opening the flaps. Don’t forget to read it again and again as children love repetition, and they will learn the storyline and “read” it back to YOU!

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

It’s Party Time!

Spot's Birthday PartyDevelop children’s print motivation by getting them excited about books. Through your enthusiasm and storytelling, children will be motivated to discover books with you and on their own. Have fun exploring Spot’s Birthday Party by Eric Hill with its entertaining flaps and playful pictures.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

That’s What It’s All About!

The Croaky Pokey!A great place to start with print motivation is to use your child’s imagination and build from there. The book The Croaky Pokey by Ethan Long has the hokey pokey in a “froggy” style and will be sure to interest kids as they pretend to be frogs and do the actions in the book. Children will interact with the book in a positive way, which will encourage an enjoyment of books and reading.

–Tip by Laura B., Youth Technology Librarian

Print Motivation

Chicky Chicky Chook Chook

By making books and their stories fun, you are helping to motivate your child to want more. Encourage your child to play along with the story. For example, you and your child can make animal sounds, act out the motions, or your child may enjoy holding a puppet or stuffed animal as you read.

–Tip by Barb M., Youth Programming and Outreach Assistant

 

Books that “Pop”

Winter's Tale by Robert SabudaReading books that your child is interested in will help with print motivation. Pop-up books are a fun way to keep children engaged while reading. Check out the collection of pop-up titles you can read at the Library by the storytime room and DVDs.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist

 

Bright Baby Touch and Feel Series

Perfect PetsPrint motivation means being interested in and enjoying books. Books with flaps, textures, and pop-ups are especially fun for babies. If they enjoyed the book the first time you read it, read it again because they will be anticipating what comes next! The Bright Baby Touch and Feel series has several fun titles.

–Tip by Carol C., Elementary School Liaison

Here We Go Again…

Hooray for Thomas!Fostering a child’s interest and enjoyment of books and reading is called print motivation and is one of the early literacy skills. Letting a child pick a book to read helps promote this skill. Children frequently will pick a favorite story to read over and over and over again. It’s only natural that you would get tired of it. Remember that children learn by repetition though, and it is important for them to have positive experiences with books. Perhaps that can help as you read your child’s favorite book yet again.

–Tip by Keary B., Youth Collection Specialist