Notes from Story Time

Thunder Boy Jr.

thunder-boyBy spending time talking about a name, we are calling attention to the connection between spoken word and print. In this story, Thunder Boy Jr. doesn’t like his name and wants a new one. It is the tradition in some communities that when you get older, you get a new name to show something you’ve done or what people hope you will do.  Talk to your child about what he/she would like their new name to be.  Write this name on a piece of paper and ask your child to draw you a picture.

 

Let’s Talk About Getting Dressed

dressedWhile reading the book Time to Get Dressed by Elivia Savadier, point out some of the silly things that happen, for example, wearing socks on your hands or pants on your head. Encourage your child to talk and give them enough time to process and respond. Letting children answer questions, describe things, pretend to read, and talk about their day helps them develop their language skills.

 

 

Let’s Play Make-Believe

princess-super-kittyWho likes to play pretend? One benefit of playing make-believe at home (besides being so fun) is that it encourages vocabulary and narrative skills, which are important pre-reading skills. The cool characters and settings that we see in picture books like Princess Super Kitty by Antoinette Porter by can inspire new ideas for playtime.

 

Clifford the Movie Star

clifford

Here is one tip for making your child’s digital experience more meaningful.  The Library has a variety of picture books that have been turned into movies.  These movies are only a few minutes long and feature the book’s illustrations as the text is read. It can be a lot of fun to see a favorite story in a new way. Many of these movies are on Playaway View, a preloaded video player.  Playaway Views are just the right size for little hands.

Rhyming in the Rain

waterRhyming is similar to singing because it helps children play with the sounds of words. As you read aloud the story Water Is Water by Miranda Paul, there are many rhyming words that also help move the story along. Before you turn the page, pause and see if your child knows what word rhymes with the current page’s second-to-last line. By making this book into a game and playing with sounds, you are helping your child learn skills needed for reading.

 

 

Cows in the Kitchen, Oh My!

cowsRepetition helps children remember words and increase their vocabulary. This is an important pre-reading skill. The catchy repetitive phrases in Cows in the Kitchen by June Crebbin make reading aloud this title a fun way to increase your child’s vocabulary.

Bug Mazing!

bug mazing2Children like to learn about what interests them, and bugs are very interesting! In the Bug Mazing app (found on the Library’s iPads), there are many different bugs that you can use as the hero. Then, check out books about bugs that you can share together.

Touch is one of the five senses that children use to learn. Using a device allows a child to touch and manipulate a screen, which is one skill needed for digital literacy.

–Tip by Dana Folkerts, Assistant Head of Youth Services.

We’re in the Band

toca bandSinging can help your child with learning to read. You can do this by saying rhymes, singing songs, reading books, and by interacting together with apps.  Try making a band together using the free app Toca Band at home on your Apple device or at the Library on the iPads.

–Tip by Laura Bos, Youth Technology Librarian

Let’s Sing


stinky cakeSinging
is a great way to slow down the words in a song so children can hear the parts blended together.  Check out some of the great CDs in the Youth Department.

–Tip by Carol Capra, Elementary School Liaison

Monster Scribbles

Monster ColorsWhen your child is little, a great way to practice writing skills is to encourage them to scribble and draw. In Monsters Love Colors by Mike Austin, the monsters like to scribble with different colored crayons. This could be a fun activity for you to do at home.

–Tip by Mary Smith, Head of Youth Services