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Poetry: Gotta Go Gotta Flow by Patricia Smith and Michael Abramson

Gotta Go Gotta Flow book coverIt started with the photos. In the 1970s, Michael Abramson took to photographing a handful of clubs in the South Side of Chicago. Decades later, acclaimed poet Patricia Smith brought new life to the pictures, creating stories surrounding the slices of history Abramson caught. To coincide with the range of black and white images, Smith’s poetry sways from introspective to steamy to empowering, inviting the reader further into fully imagining the life behind the subjects dancing and living throughout the pages of Gotta Go, Gotta Flow.

 

 

Patricia Smith is known for her skill with spoken-word poetry, which is an oral art form drawing attention to the way words sound and are presented to share a specific message. Check out a few more books featuring popular spoke-word poets.

Listen Up cover imageListen Up
by Zoe Anglesey
A great introductory to spoken-word poetry, Anglesey features nine diverse poets including a short introduction of them and a sampling of their poems.
This is Woman's Work cover imageThis is Woman’s Work
by Dominique Christina
Although it’s primarily a guide assisting woman in defining themselves, award-winning poet Christina sprinkles powerful poems on womanhood throughout this book.
To This Day cover imageTo This Day
by Shane Koyczan
Full spread pages of art brings added power and beauty to Koyczan’s strong words about his and others’ experiences with bullying.

 

 

Poetry is category S of the Summer Reading Challenge. It’s not too late to join!
Not sure how to get started?  We have advice!
Share what you read and see what other people are reading using #MPPLsummer16

For reading suggestions, email us at readers@mppl.org or tweet at us @MPPLIB

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Audiobook: Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley

Lily and the Octopus book coverIt’s Thursday the first time Ted sees it. Thursdays are the nights he and Lily talk about cute boys. This night they are debating the Chrises (Hemsworth, Evans, Pine, or Pratt?) but suddenly it doesn’t matter because there is an octopus perched like a birthday party hat on his dog’s head. The octopus, what others might call a tumor, is hungry, and its arrival changes everything.

Steven Rowley’s debut Lily and the Octopus is one of the warmest, wittiest, heart-squeeziest celebrations of love between pet and owner that you will ever encounter. Actor Michael Urie narrates with a nimble flexibility: barking out Lily’s staccato excitement, adding edge to the taunting of the octopus, and giving voice to Ted’s ongoing swirl of emotions. Ted and Lily’s tale will make you giggle, make you weep, and make you very, very glad such stories are in the world.

Staff Pick: The Coincidence of Coconut Cake by Amy Reichert

Picture of DeniseThe Coincidence of Coconut Cake by Amy Reichert is a summer must-read! It’s an uncomplicated and downright NICE book with likeable characters, a great setting (Milwaukee) and a simple plot that works! I haven’t been to Milwaukee in years and thanks to this book I will be making the trip and quite possibly eat the coconut cake!

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Read a Book Published in the Decade You Were Born

Welcome to the last quarter of the 2016 Summer Reading Challenge! Looking for a home-stretch read? Choose a theme flexible enough to include a type of book you already like. Category B is Read a Book Published in the Decade You Were Born, and it offers all sorts of options.

1. Match your favorites: Do you like mysteries, romances, or another specific flavor of story? Find out what was being written in that genre when you were young. We can help!

2. Educate yourself: Choose something from that decade’s bestsellers list or that is now taught as a modern classic.

3. Made into a movie:  Books-to-movies aren’t a new phenomenon. Look at famous films from your birth decade and connect a few to their original novels.

4. Browse a sampling : Below are lists for each decade to give you a place to start. Click through and find a book that entered the world around the time you did.

 
 
 

It’s not too late to join the Summer Reading Challenge.
Not sure how to get started?  We have advice!
Share what you read and see what other people are reading using #MPPLsummer16

For reading suggestions, email us at readers@mppl.org or tweet at us @MPPLIB

Book Discussion Questions: The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings book coverTitle: The Invention of Wings
Author: Sue Monk Kidd
Page Count: 373 pages
Genre: Historical Fiction
Tone: Moving, Authentic, Strength

Summary:
The story follows Hetty “Handful” Grimke, a Charleston slave, and Sarah, the daughter of the wealthy Grimke family. The novel begins on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership over Handful, who is to be her handmaid and follows the next thirty-five years of their lives. Inspired in part by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke (a feminist, suffragist and, importantly, an abolitionist), Kidd allows herself to go beyond the record to flesh out the inner lives of all the characters, both real and imagined

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

The Library is happy to share these original questions for your use. If reproducing, please credit with the following statement:  2016 Mount Prospect Public Library. All rights reserved. Used with Permission.

1. How many of you would say you enjoy historical fiction? What is it about historical fiction that you enjoy? For others, what don’t you enjoy about it?

2. Did this book meet your expectations? Why or why not?

3. Did you like the way the story was told, with each chapter going back and forth between Sarah and Handful? Why or why not?

4. In the book who needed wings and how did they obtain them? Where does the author use the image of birds and flight?

5. What qualities in Sarah, Nina, and Handful did you most admire? What other admirable characters were there in the story?

6. Understanding the time and the family Sarah was brought up in, what made Sarah desire and fight for a different life for herself, other women and slaves?

7. Sarah fought against what was expected of her throughout her life. Use your imagination and tell me what her life would have been like had she acquiesced. Could she have been happy?

8. What significance did the fleur-de-lis button hold for Sarah? What was the significance of Charlotte’s story quilt? What was the significance of the rabbit-head cane that Handful receives from Goodis? What was significant about the spirit tree?

9. What gave Handful and Sarah strength to do all that they did?

10. What does having an ally mean when facing a difficult task? Who were Sarah’s allies throughout the different times of her life? Who were Handful’s allies?

11. How are the two causes of abolition and women’s rights similar? How are they different?

12. What were some of the pivotal moments in the story? Give examples of where you saw Handful moving toward freedom. Give examples of where you saw Sarah moving toward freedom.

13. Did you find the ending satisfying?

14. If this book was made into a movie would you go see it?

Want help with your book discussion group? Check out tips, advice, and all the ways the Library can help support your group!

OTHER RESOURCES:

Reading Group Guide on Sue Monk Kidd’s website
Hobart and William Smith Colleges’ Discussion Guide
Discussion questions from blogger, Wide Lawns
Q&A video with Oprah and Sue Monk Kidd
NPR interview with Sue Monk Kidd
More about the Grimke Sisters

Readalikes:
A Mercy book cover Miss Emily book cover The Wedding Gift book cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Mercy by Toni Morrison
Miss Emily by Nuala O’Connor
The Wedding Gift by Marlen Suyapa Bodden

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What is a Microhistory?

Category O in the 2016 MPPL Summer Reading challenge encourages you to read a microhistory. But wait, what is a microhistory? It is a very narrow or specific study on a single event or object throughout history. Below are just a few of the many titles we carry at the Library! Take one out and become an expert.

Labor of Love book coverLabor of Love: The Invention of Dating
by Moira Weigel
Weigel examines dating throughout the ages, from the days of video dating in the 1980s to today’s texting.
The Warmth of Other Suns book coverThe Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson
Three American migrants are traced as they moved from the South to the North to create an emotional yet inspirational story of the struggles involved.

 

The Most Perfect Thing book coverThe Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird’s Egg
by Tim Birkhead
Bursting with everything you wanted to know about bird eggs, this will cause you to look at birds in a new way!
Banana book coverBanana: The Fate of the Fruit that Changed the World
By Dan Koeppel
A life without bananas? Sounds impossible, right? Wrong! Koeppel tracks bananas through the ages and the sobering reality that bananas as we know them are at risk.

 

Paper Paging Through History book coverPaper: Paging Through History
by Mark Kurlansky
How has paper changed from its beginning to now? Kurlansky (known for Salt) shares the unique roles paper has played in society.
Oneida book coverOneida: From Free Love Utopia to the Well-Set Table
by Ellen Wayland-Smith
Wayland-Smith explores the Oneida community in America, which rejected monogamy, marriage, and the traditional family structure in 1848 and eventually turned itself into a successful silverware company.

 

It’s not too late to join the Summer Reading Challenge.
Not sure how to get started?  We have advice!
Share what you read and see what other people are reading using #MPPLsummer16

For reading suggestions, email us at readers@mppl.org or tweet at us @MPPLIB

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Fiction: Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton

Margaret the First book coverWell-behaved women seldom make history,” and it isn’t for lack of trying that the once-notorious Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, is now largely unknown. After a shy, sheltered girlhood, a later life at court led to a new-found confidence in her intelligence, imagination, and ambition. She unabashedly flouted social norms, even earning the nickname “Mad Madge”. The one thing she did retain from her youth was her passion for writing, and she published extensively under her own name and with the support of her husband, both of which were nearly unheard of in the 17th Century. Danielle Dutton presents the life of Margaret the First in a series of personal tableaus that play out in short and fast-moving chapters.  You’ll be introduced to a fascinating woman from history who still has quite a bit to say to the world today.

This title will count as category F in the Summer Reading Challenge: Read a book of historical fiction set before 1900.

For more pre-1900 biographical fiction about fearless characters in the arts, try..

Exit the Actress book coverExit the Actress
by Priya Parmar
The Master book coverThe Master
by Colm Tóibín
In America book coverIn America
by Susan Sontag

 

It’s not too late to join the Summer Reading Challenge.
Not sure how to get started?  We have advice!
Share what you read and see what other people are reading using #MPPLsummer16

For reading suggestions, email us at readers@mppl.org or tweet at us @MPPLIB

Staff Pick: 50/50

Janine from Circulation suggests the movie 50/50

50/50 cover imageJoseph Gordon Levitt stars as Adam, a normal 27-year-old, aside from the fact that he just found out he has a rare spinal cancer. His odds of survival are 50-50. While that all sounds pretty dire, the journey the viewer takes with Adam will have them laughing out loud.  Between Adam’s loyal but lewd best friend (Seth Rogen), his unreliable girlfriend (Bryce Dallas Howard), overbearing mother (Anjelica Houston), and young, inexperienced therapist (Anna Kendrick), there are plenty of laughs to be had along the way.

That’s not to say the entire movie is all fun and games. The movie strikes a delicate balance between sharing the gravity of his illness and all that comes with it. As Adam’s therapist, Katherine, tells him, “You can’t change your situation. The only thing that you can change is how you choose to deal with it.” 50/50 is the story of how he deals with it, and the story is achingly honest, heart-breaking and hilarious in equal measure.

For more humorous stories with heart, try…

The Night Before dvd cover

 

The Night Before (DVD): Seth Rogen and Joseph Gordon-Levitt team up again, this time with Anthony Mackie joining them. The three friends spend a hilarious Christmas Eve roaming New York City in search of a Christmas party they’ll never forget.

 

 

Juno dvd cover

 

Juno (DVD): Juno MacGuff is 16, pregnant, and knows keeping the baby isn’t an option. This quirky, heartwarming movie is one you won’t soon forget.

 

 

 

Silver Linings Playbook dvd cover

 

Silver Linings Playbook (DVD): Bradley Cooper plays a bipolar man who befriends a similarly unstable woman while living at home with his parents in this story about family, and learning to love yourself and others, flaws and all.

 

 

Where'd You Go Bernadette book cover

 

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple (Book): A funny book about an unforgettable woman named Bernadette, who disappears, leaving her daughter to find her any way she can. (book)

 

 

Picture of Tig


Live
by Tig Notaro (Audiobook): Comedian Tig Notaro’s groundbreaking stand-up performance is kicked off by announcing to the audience that she had cancer. Oh, and that was just after her mother unexpectedly died and she went through a terrible breakup. Raw, funny, and honest.

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Read a Book with Nonhuman Characters

Up for a challenge? Read a story that is told from the perspective of an object, an animal, or an idea! You may be well familiar with the many books centering on dogs or cats (and we’re fans of those, too), but try stretching yourself to see what you can learn about the human condition from something less familiar but just as decidedly nonhuman.  Below are a dozen noteworthy entries in different genres that can help you Read for the Win!

Firmin book covera rat

 

Jacobs Folly book covera house fly

 

My Name is Red book covera coin, a corpse, a tree…

 

The Bees book coverbees
The Bees

 

Join the Summer Reading Challenge.
Print your events list and scorecard here.
Not sure how to get started?  We have advice!

For reading suggestions, email us at readers@mppl.org or tweet at us @MPPLIB

Regardless of what you read and how you choose to read it, share your picks using #MPPLsummer16