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Top 5 Reasons Hamilton Lovers Should Use Hoopla

Hoopla is a website and app that you can use to instantly borrow books, movies, music, ebooks, television episodes, and comics with no added cost. Luckily for Hamilton lovers, there is a wealth of material to fully invest into your current (or new) Hamilton obsession!

This season Hoopla has in store for you…

Simply Christmas album cover#1: The sweet holiday sounds of Aaron Burr

You may not have realized you wanted a Leslie Odom Jr. Christmas album until you listen to his 2016 release, Simply Christmas and you realize the season wouldn’t be complete without it. Odom’s silky jazz voice has a calming effect, setting the for curling up in a Library chair as you watch the snow fall and the cars drive past. For Sara Bareilles and Ingrid Michaelson lovers, it includes a cover of “Winter Song.”

 

 

hamilton-mixtape album cover

#2: A mashup of the 18th and 21st century

The Hamilton Mixtape has an all-star mashup of recording artists coming from all different genres, including Sia, Usher, Alicia Keys, K’NAAN, and Kelly Clarkson. There’s a healthy mix of keeping some of the songs close to the original Broadway recording and completely re-imagining them. Plus, there are demos of Valley Forge and Cabinet Battle No. 3 by Lin Manuel-Miranda included.

 

 

the-federalist-papers book cover#3: Original work by Alexander Hamilton

Has your interest in American history been peaked? Take advantage and start with The Federalist Papers which was rapped about in “Non-Stop.”

“Alexander joins forces with James Madison and John Jay to write a series of essays defending the new United States Constitution, entitled The Federalist Papers. The plan was to write a total of twenty-five essays, the work divided evenly among the three men. In the end, they wrote eighty-five essays, in the span of six months. John Jay got sick after writing five. James Madison wrote twenty-nine. Hamilton wrote the other fifty-one!”
“Non-Stop” by Lin Manuel-Miranda

 

aristotle-and-dante-discover-the-secrets-of-the-universe book cover

#4: 7.5 hours of Lin Manuel-Miranda reading to you

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe is story of two boys and how their friendship helps them to discover more about themselves and where they fit in the world. The combination of this award-winning story by Bejamin Alire Sâenz and Lin Manuel-Miranda’s voice is an incredible duet.

 

 

And last but definitely not least…

Hamilton#5: The Original Broadway Cast Recording

For the person who still hasn’t gotten a copy of the cast album or listened to it entirely, we’re here for you. Hamilton: An American Musical is available 24/7 to download and listen to at you’re leisure!

 

 

 

For more suggestions to feed your Hamilton obsession no matter how big or small it is, email us at readers@mppl.org or stop by the Fiction/AV/Teen Services desk!

Book Discussion Questions: Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather

Death Comes for the Archbishop book coverTitle:  Death Comes for the Archbishop
Author:  Willa Cather
Page Count: 297 pages
Genre: Historical FictionClassic, Inspirational Fiction
Tone:  Contemplative, Unassuming, Strong Sense of Place

Summary:
In 1851 French Bishop Latour is dispatched to New Mexico to reawaken its slumbering Catholicism. Moving along the endless prairies, he spreads his faith the only way he knows—gently, although he must contend with the unforgiving landscape, derelict and sometimes openly rebellious priests, and his own loneliness.

 

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

The Library is happy to share these original questions for your use. If reproducing, please credit with the following statement:  2016 Mount Prospect Public Library. All rights reserved. Used with Permission.

1. How would you describe the mood of this book? Did you like it?

2. How does the Prologue set the scene for the story? What attitudes and themes does it foreshadow?

3. Describe the friendship between Jean Latour and Joseph Valliant. How essential is their relationship to the book as a whole?

4. Magdalena’s story is one of the more memorable in their early travels, and she then recurs throughout the book. What impact does her character have on the priests? On the reader?

5. Is this a Catholic book? What does it have to say about the greater theme of faith?

6. Are there aspects of religion (or those who profess to be religious) that are portrayed in a negative light?

7. Was the mission of the priests one of service, conversion, or something else? Did they make a difference?

8. What does Latour have in common with the ideal of the Western hero? What is different?

9. Some readers have trouble with Latour due to his lack of passion and sometimes even coldness. Is this how he struck you?

10. When deciding whom to appoint, it is said

The new vicar must be a young man, of strong constitution, full of zeal, and above all, intelligent. He will have to deal with savagery and ignorance, with dissolute priests and political intrigue. He must be a man to whom order is necessary – as dear as life.

      What do you think of these qualities? Were the Cardinals right? Are there others that proved to be necessary in the position?

11. How would you characterize the ways in which the priests interacted with their communities? With individuals? Was there anything that you think they should have done differently?

12. Did you respond to the vivid descriptions of settings, of landscape, of nature? Were there any that stood out especially?

13. In what ways are art and architecture a theme in the book?

14. What was the prevailing attitude toward Americans? Was this justified?

15. What did you think of Cather’s decision to use several historical names and figures in her story? Does this add credibility? Distract?

16. What instances of humor did you find in the book?

17. How satisfied are you with the title? Why do you think it was chosen?

18. Would you say this is an easy book to read? How difficult is it to describe or summarize?

19. Cather considered this book to be her best and most important. Do you agree? Even if you haven’t read other works, do you see significance?

20. Cather once wrote, “When people ask me if it has been a hard or easy road, I always answer with the quotation, ‘The end is nothing, the road is all.'” What do you think of that statement in general? Is this sentiment effectively illustrated by Death Comes for the Archbishop?

Want help with your book discussion group? Check out tips, advice, and all the ways the Library can help support your group!

OTHER RESOURCES:

Death Comes for the Archbishop as one of All-TIME 100 Novels
Willa Cather biography
The Protestant Who Wrote the Greatest Book About American Catholicism
Cather draws attention to New Mexico history
Footsteps: Entering the World of Willa Cather’s Archbishop (via The New York Times)
Discussion questions from the Classics Reading Group of Algonquin Area Public Library

READALIKES:

Crossing Purgatory book coverCrossing Purgatory
by Gary Schanbacher

Lila
by Marilynne Robinson

Staff Pick: Time and Again by Jack Finney

Joe from Research Services suggests Time and Again by Jack Finney

Time and Again book coverSimon “Si” Morley is an illustrator in 1970s New York, not quite unhappy but wondering if there could be more to his satisfactory, if mundane, life. Then Si is recruited by a shadowy, unofficial government group secretly working on a project to send agents back in time to observe—and possibly alter—history. In 1882 New York, Si tries to discover the circumstances behind the curious suicide of a prominent businessman, while falling in love with fellow boarder Julia. This meticulously researched novel straddles fantasy and historical fiction, using an uncomplicated time-travel plot device to stage detailed historical descriptions. The author’s use of illustrations, paintings and photographs is cleverly incorporated into the plot, adding an unusual but interesting twist on the first-person narrative. While the book takes its time establishing the context and method for time travel, the leisurely pace picks up as romantic and other mystery-related developments begin to drive the plot. Ideal for readers who enjoy love stories with a historical and or fantasy bent, with a particular interest in historical New York.

Interested in reading more unique takes on history and/or time travel? Try one of these!

 

the-time-travelers-wife book coverThe Time Traveler’s Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger

 

kindred book coverKindred
by Octavia Butler
outlander book coverOutlander
by Diana Gabaldon
the-alienist book coverThe Alienist
by Caleb Carr

List: Fantastical Holiday Reads

Now that it’s December, you may be in the mood for a tale trimmed with tinsel. Mystery fans, romance readers, and humor devotees don’t lack for brightly-wrapped packages, but those who enjoy wondering about life in other worlds or pushing the boundaries of what-if won’t need to settle for coal. Fill your stocking with science fiction and fantasy stories that embrace the Christmas spirit!

Christmas Stars book coverChristmas Stars
ed. by David C. Hartwell
A collection of holiday miracle stories by top fantasy and science fiction writers includes the tales of a father’s gift that opens up the universe for all humanity and the original fantasy that inspired the film It’s a Wonderful Life.
Season of Wonder book coverSeason of Wonder
ed. by Paula Guran
Yuletide brings marvels and miracles both fantastic and scientific. The best stories from many realms of fantasy and a multitude of future universes, gift-wrapped in this spectacular treasury of wintertime wonder.
Yuletide Universe book coverA Yuletide Universe: Sixteen Fantastical Tales
ed. by Brian M. Thomsen
A compilation of holiday tales by a range of science fiction and fantasy authors includes contributions by such notables as Neil Gaiman, Clive Barker, Anne McCaffrey, and Harlan Ellison.

 

War of Gifts book coverA War of Gifts: An Ender Story
by Orson Scott Card
Chaos erupts at Battle School when a student places a gift in another student’s shoe on Sinterklaaus Day, an act of rebellion that forces everyone to make a choice during the War over Santa Claus.
Miracle and Other Christmas Stories book coverMiracle and Other Christmas Stories
by Connie Willis
Multiple Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author Willis captures the timeless essence of generosity and goodwill in stories that transport readers to fascinating realms filled with wonder and joy.
Krampus the Yule Lord book coverKrampus, the Yule Lord
by Brom
When he stumbles upon a magical bag that belongs to Krampus, the Lord of Yule and the dark enemy of Santa Claus, struggling songwriter Jesse gets an unexpected chance to save his daughter and his own broken dreams–and return wild magic to Boone County, West Virginia.

Audiobook: Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mue

Behold The Dreamers book coverLife is brimming with potential for Cameroonian immigrant Jende Jonga and his family. Set in New York in 2007, Jende has just gotten a new job chauffeuring for the rich, white Edwards family and his wife Neni is on her way to becoming a pharmacist. Their journeys are about to get harder however, as they face the realities of living in a new country on the brink of recession and the Edwards family’s own hardships start to bleed into their lives.

Prentice Onayemi is the versatile narrator of this 2016 debut, changing tones and cadences to take on the different characters’ accents and genders to fully bring the characters alive. A story simultaneously of hope and heartbreak,  Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue is all about the turbulence of trying to achieve your dreams no matter where you reside in life.

The Hogarth Shakespeare Project

Hogarth Series book covers

Considering that 2016 marks the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, it is nothing short of remarkable that his plays not only are still read and appreciated but also have resonance for us today. The Hogarth Shakespeare Project, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, has invited award-winning and bestselling novelists to put their own spin on several of these enduring tales. Upcoming releases include works by Jo Nesbø, Tracy Chevalier, Edward St. Aubyn, and Gillian Flynn, but you can read these inventive takes on the Bard right now:

Gap of Time book coverThe Gap of Time: The Winter’s Tale Retold  by Jeanette Winterson

A baby girl is abandoned, banished from London to the storm-ravaged American city of New Bohemia. Her father has been driven mad by jealousy, her mother to exile by grief. Seventeen years later, Perdita doesn’t know a lot about who she is or where she’s come from – but she’s about to find out.

Her story is one of childhood friendship, money, status, technology, and the elliptical nature of time. Written with energy and wit, this is a tale of the consuming power of jealousy on the one hand, and redemption and the enduring love of a lost child on the other.

 

Hag-Seed book coverHag-Seed: The Tempest Retold  by Margaret Atwood

Felix, whose productions have amazed and confounded, is at the top of his game as artistic director of the Makeshiweg Theatre Festival. His planned staging of The Tempest not only will boost his reputation, it will heal emotional wounds. Or that was the plan.

Instead, after an act of unforeseen treachery, Felix is living in exile in a backwoods hovel, haunted by memories of his beloved lost daughter, Miranda. After twelve years, revenge finally arrives in the shape of a theatre course at a nearby prison. Here Felix and his inmate actors will put on his Tempest and snare the traitors who destroyed him. It’s magic! But will it remake Felix as his enemies fall?

Shylock Is My Name book coverShylock Is My Name: The Merchant of Venice Retold  by Howard Jacobson

The most provocative character in Shakespeare, Shylock finds his present-day counterpart in art dealer and conflicted father Simon Strulovitch. Already grieving his beloved wife, he cannot reconcile himself to his daughter Beatrice’s betrayal of her family and heritage in choosing to be with a footballer notorious for giving a Nazi salute on the field. Culminating in a shocking twist on Shylock’s demand for the infamous pound of flesh, Jacobson’s insightful retelling examines contemporary, acutely relevant questions of Jewish identity while maintaining a poignant sympathy for its characters.

Vinegar Girl book coverVinegar Girl: The Taming of the Shrew Retold  by Anne Tyler

Kate is a socially awkward young woman, adored by the preschool children she teaches but misunderstood by her peers. Her father is a scientific genius, but not so great on emotions. About to lose his (equally genius, equally socially inept) research assistant, Pyotr Cherbakov, because of visa problems, and desperate to save the project that is his life’s work, he comes up with a plan: Kate will marry Pyotr who will then be able to stay in the country and finish the project. The plan sounds perfect, except for one small hitch: Kate.

 

Book Discussion Questions: Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

Big Little Lies book coverTitle: Big Little Lies
Author:  Liane Moriarty
Page Count: 460 pages
Genre: Contemporary fiction
Tone: Darkly humorous, relatable, chatty

Summary:
Follows three mothers, each at a crossroads, and their potential involvement in a riot at a school trivia night that leaves one parent dead in what appears to be a tragic accident, but which evidence shows might have been premeditated.

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

The Library is happy to share these original questions for your use. If reproducing, please credit with the following statement:  2016 Mount Prospect Public Library. All rights reserved. Used with Permission.

1. How would you describe this book to someone?

2. Did you relate to one of the characters the most?

3. Who did you think was going to die? Who did you think was the murderer?

4. Why do you think the author chose to include snippets of the reporter’s interviews throughout the book? What purpose do you think she hoped it would serve? Do you think it was effective?

5. What are some of the themes in the book?

6. What do you think Moriarty was trying to say about bullying? Were the acts of the children bullying any different than the stuff going on with the adults? Was one more or less harmful?

7. Do you think Madeline is oversensitive or is she justified in the fights she gets in?

8. Why did you think Celeste wanted to leave Perry at the beginning?

9. There is violence in Jane’s life and violence in Celeste’s life. Is there (or was there) violence in Madeline’s life?

10. Women and their looks are discussed a lot in the book. Do you think this obsession with looks is specific to women, particularly women of a certain age?   Why or why not? Do you think there was an overall message being said?

11. “It was like wealth was an embarrassing medical condition. It was the same with Celeste’s beauty. Strangers gave Celeste the same furtive looks they gave to people with missing limbs…” (pg 32). Does this happen in real life?

12. Why do you think everyone was so quick to suspect Ziggy?

13. What did you think when Jane started suspecting her own son? Why did you think she did? Why don’t you think the other parents didn’t suspect their kids?

14. Did you think Ziggy was the bully? Did you think he was being bullied? Did you suspect it was really Max? Was it believable how he took the fall?

15. Did you ever suspect Saxon Banks was Perry? When did you begin to suspect?

16. Did you suspect Tom was not, in fact, gay? Were you glad for Jane?

17. Jane starts the book being nauseous at the thought of having any other relationships. Why was she able to start something with Tom?

18. Was Madeline joking with her phrase, “never forgive, never forget?” Does she change throughout the book?

19. How did you like Bonnie? Did Madeline’s reaction to her make you like her more or less?

20. Celeste and Madeline are so different. Why do you think they ended up becoming and staying such good friends?

21. Did it surprise you that Celeste would try to fight back?

22. Is the fact that Perry travels so much really the reason why they never ended up working on fixing their marriage?

23. Did trivia night meet your expectations?

24. What did you think of the teacher? Did that change throughout the book?

25. Bonnie says, “We see. We… see!” (p. 421) Were you surprised to learn about Bonnie’s history?  Were you surprised to discover that all along Max had been seeing what Perry was doing to Celeste?

26. Moriarty tackled so many subjects– among them bullying, spousal abuse, problems with their marriages, dealing with traumas from the past, beauty. Did it work? Why add so many? Was it too much?

27. “All conflict can be traced back to someone’s feelings getting hurt, don’t you think?” do you think that’s true?

28. What genre would you call this book?

29. Is this a realistic look at motherhood?

30. Do you think you have to have had kids going to school to get the full effect of the book?

31. Are the issues in Big Little Lies exclusive to upper middle class families?

OTHER RESOURCES:

Reading Group Guide
Penguin Book Club discussion questions
Audio Interview with Moriarty at the Sydney Writers’ Festival
HBO series update
Big Little Lies book club hosting ideas

READALIKES:

The Slap book coverCover of Hyacinth Girls  little-children

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Slap by Christos Tsiolkas
Hyacinth Girls by Lauren Frankel
Little Children by Tom Perrotta

Staff Pick: Movies Featuring Tony Leung Chu-Wa

Diane-DHong Kong actor Tony Leung Chu-Wa is the star of the classic films Chungking Express, Hard-Boiled, Grandmaster, Happy Together, In the Mood for Love, Infernal Affairs, Ashes of Time and many more.

Seven-time Hong Kong Film Award Best Actor winner (out of 13 nominations) and winner of the Cannes Film Festival award for Best Actor, Mr. Leung is one of the finest actors of his generation in Hong Kong.

Recent and Upcoming Movie Releases Based on Short Stories

Sometimes reading the book the film was adapted after doesn’t have to take long at all! Movies shown below are based off of short stories, which vary from alien invasions to supernatural serial killers to intimate character studies. Check them out before you see the movies or read them after you watch to compare and contrast. Enjoy!

Julieta book cover
Runaway book cover

Runaway by Alice Munro is a starred review collection of short stories centering around women of varying ages and situations. What connects the stories is Munro’s ability to focus on the passions and motivations of her characters, providing a thorough reflection of them. The movie Julieta weaves together three of Munro’s stories that center around one woman trying to leave her husband.

In theaters December 2016

 

 


The Bye Bye Man book cover

The Bye Bye Man and Other Strange-but-True Tales by Robert Damon Schneck dives into paranormal stories in America’s history. Its title story and the basis for the new movie, The Bye Bye Man follows three college students in the 90s playing around with a Ouija board. Without meaning to, they unleash the deadly and terrifying spirit of a serial killer known as The Bye Bye Man.

In theaters January 2017

 

 

 


Arrival book cover
20 Years of the Year's Best Science Fiction book cover

Framed around the question of what if someone on Earth could interpret alien language, Ted Chiang’s award winning short story, “Story of Your Life” provides the foundation for 2016 film Arrival in which a linguist is enlisted by the military to communicate with an alien spaceship that landed on earth. The short story is especially notable for how it is constructed and portrays the alien language.

In theaters November 2016