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New: Historical Fiction and Romance

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Historical Fiction Books

Wives of Los Alamos book cover

Winter King book cover

Somerset book cover

 

•   The Wives of Los Alamos by Tarashea Nesbit

•   The Winter King by Alys Clare

•   Somerset by Leila Meacham

•   The Daring Ladies of Lowell by Kate Alcott

•   Butterfly Palace by Colleen Coble

•   Frog Music by Emma Donoghue

•   A Burnable Book by Bruce Holsinger

•   Motherland by Maria Hummel

•   The Lion and the Rose by Kate Quinn

New: Romance Books

Betting the Rainbow book cover

Melting the Ice book cover

MacGregors Lady book cover

•  Betting the Rainbow by Jodi Thomas

•   Melting the Ice by Jaci Burton

•   The MacGregor’s Lady by Grace Burrowes

•   Huckleberry Hill by Jennifer Beckstrand

•   Romancing the Duke by Tessa Dare

•   True Love by Jude Deveraux

•   The Seduction of Miss Amelia Bell by Paula Quinn

•   Once in a Lifetime by Jill Shalvis

By Readers' Advisor on March 28, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, New Arrivals, Romance

Fiction: Scarlett by Alexandra Ripley

Scarlett book coverYou may know that there is an authorized sequel to Gone with the Wind, but did you know that part of it takes place in Ireland? Not even quintessential Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara can resist the lure of the Emerald Isle. Leaving the Civil War and Reconstruction behind, Scarlett decides to explore her father’s working-class Irish roots in Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. Historical romance author Alexandra Ripley was hand-picked by Mitchell’s heirs to continue the epic story of Scarlett and her determination to embrace tomorrow. That journey leads her across the Atlantic to a very different life among the O’Haras of County Meath, but even the lush landscapes can’t fully distract her from the man who walked away.

By Readers' Advisor on March 17, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, Romance

Fiction: The 2014 Reading List Awards

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

This week we invite you to check out The Reading List, which honors outstanding titles in the most popular categories. Here are the featured winners, and you can follow the link for the other finalists and readalikes.

Red Sparrow book cover

Vicious book cover

Outcasts book cover    

     -  AdrenalineRed Sparrow by Jason Matthews
     -  FantasyVicious by V.E. Schwab
     -  Historical FictionThe Outcasts by Kathleen Kent

Last Days book coverMurder as a Fine Art book coverAny Duchess Will Do book cover
    

     -  Horror Last Days by Adam Nevill
     -  MysteryMurder as a Fine Art by David Morrell
     -  RomanceAny Duchess Will Do by Tessa Dare

Love Minus Eighty book coverMe Before You book cover

   

     -  Science FictionLove Minus Eighty by Will McIntosh
     -  Women’s FictionMe Before You by Jojo Moyes

By Readers' Advisor on March 14, 2014 Categories: Awards, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Historical Fiction, Horror, Lists, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense, Romance

Staff Pick: Gosford Park

Diane D.Are you hooked on Downton Abbey? Did you know the series was inspired by Robert Altman’s film Gosford Park? Julian Fellowes, creator of Downton Abbey, won the Oscar for Best Screenplay for Gosford Park. Check out Maggie Smith as Countess of Trentham before she became Downton Abbey’s Countess of Grantham!

By Readers' Advisor on February 25, 2014 Categories: Historical Fiction, Movies and TV, Picks by Diane, Staff Picks

Fiction: The Big Crowd by Kevin Baker

The Big Crowd book coverIf you want historical fiction set in New York, Kevin Baker is the author for you. His latest novel, The Big Crowd, explores the life of Charlie O’Kane – a real immigrant who came to NYC and worked his way up from beat cop to district attorney to mayor. Tom, Charlie’s younger brother, sees Charlie as everything good in a city that’s gone bad. The brothers live the high life…until Charlie is accused of murder and Tom sets out to clear his name. A sprawling family saga intertwined with a mob mystery, The Big Crowd is a great read for those who like dramatic historical fiction, The Godfather, or chronicles of New York.

By Readers' Advisor on February 20, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction

New: Historical Fiction and Romance

Every Friday the Library will bring you two short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Historical Fiction Books

Mrs. Lincoln's Rival book cover

The Pagan Lord book cover

An Officer and a Spy book cover

•    Mrs. Lincoln’s Rival by Jenniver Chiaverini

•    The Pagan Lord by Bernard Cornwell

•    An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris

•    Motherland by Maria Hummel

•    The Wife, the Maid and the Mistress by Ariel Lawhon

•    The Ghost of Mary Celeste by Valerie Martin

•    I Shall be Near to You by Erin Lindsay McCabe

•    Nostalgia by Dennis McFarland

•    The Lion and the Rose by Kate Quinn

•    The Kept by James Scott

New: Romance Books

Hope Flames book cover

How to Master your Marquis book cover

Sweetest Mistake book cover

•    The Scandal in Kissing an Heir by Sophie Barnes

•    Hope Flames by Jaci Burton

•    Dark Wolf by Christine Feehan

•    How to Master Your Marquis by Juliana Gray

•    Sugar by Jenna Jameson

•    The Bride Says No by Cathy Maxwell

•    Wuthering Nights by I.J. Miller

•    First Love by James Patterson

•    Sweetest Mistake by Candis Terry

•    What Nora Knew by Linda Yellin

By Readers' Advisor on February 14, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, New Arrivals, Romance

Book Discussion Questions: Homer and Langley by E.L. Doctorow

Homer and Langley book cover

SPOILER WARNING: These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points, if you have not read the book.

 

Title: Homer and Langley
Author: E.L. Doctorow
Page Count: 208
Genre: Historical fiction, Biographical novels
Tone: Lyrical, dark, complex

 

1. In an interview on NPR, E.L. Doctorow said that the first line of this book was pivotal for him; he could not have done this book without this 1st sentence. It implies the texture of the entire text. Does anyone remember the 1st line? What is its importance to the reader?

2. Given this opening, how do you think Homer emotionally and physically handled his blindness? Do you think it was a “normal” reaction?

3. Homer went blind in his last 14 years of life from a stroke, not in his earlier years. Does this change your opinion of him?

4. Do you remember the description of their house? Do you think of the house as a character as well as the setting?

5. Do you think the house’s condition reflects the brothers’ own physical and mental conditions?

6. How would you describe Homer at the beginning of the story? What about Langley? What were their parents like?

7. What events happen in Homer and Langley’s lives that change everything?

8. What was Homer’s reaction to his parents’ death?

9. What effect did the WWI have on Langley? Did it change him? How would the brothers’ lives have been different if there had been no war?

10. What was Langley’s “Theory of Replacements”? Does the theory have any merit?

11. Langley is obsessive in his quest to create one universal newspaper of “seminal events”. What categories were used by Langley so that the newspaper would be “eternally current”? Why was this project so important to him?

12. There was an eclectic assortment of people who came into Homer and Langley’s lives. Do you feel that the brothers collected people the way that Langley collected objects? Did these people have anything in common?

13. Besides Homer and Langley, who are the most memorable character for you and why?

14. At one point, the Collyer brothers host tea dances in their home and charge their neighbors for the opportunity to drink and dance. Are the tea dances connected to Homer and Langley later becoming reclusive? Were they ever raided? If so, what happened after they were raided?

15. When WWII begins, the Hoshiyama’s, American born people of Japanese descent, are persecuted. What happens to them? Why? Is this based on history? What was your reaction to their persecution?

16. After the Hoshiyama’s were sent to an internment camp Langley said, “…We are not free if at someone else’s sufferance…” What did he mean by that?

17. After Harold Robileaux is killed in Africa, Grandmamma goes to New Orleans to be with his wife and baby. “Grandmamma had been the last connection to our past. I had understood her as some referent moral authority to whom we paid no heed, but by whose judgments we measured our waywardness.” Do you think things would still have gotten so bad is she had not left the brothers?

18. What did you think of the gas masks Langley bought? Why did he buy them?

19. Do you think the Collyer brothers tried to be completely self-reliant? What were their tactics? Were they successful?

20. Do you think the brothers were any crazier than the people around them?

21. Why do you think the press became so interested in their predicament?

22. What is the importance of Jacqueline? Did she remind you of anybody of that era? Do you think Jacqueline actually existed?

23. Do you think it was a sacrifice for either brother to stay in the house?

24. As is often the case in historical fiction, the author took liberties with known facts about the Collyer brothers. Why do you think E.L. Doctorow made these changes and how does it affect the dynamics between the two brothers? Do you think these changes made the characters more sympathetic?

25. How heavily did the hoarding take up your attention as a reader? Do you think hoarding is an unsettling disorder to observe? Why or why not?

 

Other Resources

E.L. Doctorow’s website
Lit Lovers book discussion questions
Cornell University book guide
Weber State University book discussion
WNYC radio interview
Inside the Collyer home
Collyer brothers Wikipedia

 

If you liked Homer and Langley, try…

Spooner by Pete Dexter
Keepsake by Kristina Riggle
Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things by Gail Steketee

Spooner cover     Keepsake coverStuff book cover

By Readers' Advisor on February 12, 2014 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Historical Fiction

Audiobook: Dangerous Women, edited by George R.R. Martin

Dangerous Women Playaway coverDanger can be alluring, frightening, and exciting all at once, and you won’t find a better illustration than in Dangerous Women, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. Whether your taste runs to female desperadoes, Scottish highlanders, warrior queens, femmes fatales, or modern magicians, you will be wowed by a carnival of choices offered by the best fan favorite writers of today. Diana Gabaldon, Jim Butcher, Lev Grossman, Sherilynn Kenyon, Carrie Vaughn, and Brandon Sanderson are among the standout contributors, and fans of Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series won’t want to miss the creator’s featured novella “The Princess and the Queen”. Intensify your thrills by listening to Dangerous Women in Playaway format, an easy-to-use portable player that holds an entire audiobook. Skip to the stories and narrators that tempt you most, but don’t be surprised if you devour them all.

Curious about Playaway and what the format has to offer?  Join us for Playaway Day on Saturday, February 1, 1-4 p.m., for giveaways and more information.

By Readers' Advisor on January 27, 2014 Categories: Audiobooks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Historical Fiction, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

New: Historical Fiction and Romance

Every Friday the Library will bring you two short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Historical Fiction Books

Paris Architect book cover

Signature of All Things book cover

Marching to Zion book cove

Morning Glory book cover

Drowning Guard book cover

Belle cora book cover

In the Night of Time book cover

Windsor Faction book cover

New: Romance Books

Law Man book cover

Pirate Bride book cover

Love After War book cover

Foreplay book cover

Big Sky Secrets book cover

Love Burns Bright book cover

Born Wild book cover

Lasat Man on Earth book cover

By Readers' Advisor on January 17, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, New Arrivals, Romance

Fiction: Lion and Leopard by Nathaniel Popkin

Lion and Leopard book coverJohn Lewis Krimmel is not much remembered by history, but he was the first American painter of genre scenes – daily life and urban events with small-to-large crowds. If he had a nemesis, it was Charles Wilson Peale, a traditional portraitist. Krimmel set forth artistic rebellion in the Philadelphia art scene dominated by Peale. Lion and Leopard by Nathaniel Popkin delves into the young American art scene through multiple points of view, ranging from three best friends (a rogue, a consumptive, and a ladies’ man) to Peale’s pet monkey. If you like elegant, leisurely historical fiction, and art history, Lion and Leopard is a must-read debut.

By Readers' Advisor on December 26, 2013 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction