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Audiobook: Dangerous Women, edited by George R.R. Martin

Dangerous Women Playaway coverDanger can be alluring, frightening, and exciting all at once, and you won’t find a better illustration than in Dangerous Women, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. Whether your taste runs to female desperadoes, Scottish highlanders, warrior queens, femmes fatales, or modern magicians, you will be wowed by a carnival of choices offered by the best fan favorite writers of today. Diana Gabaldon, Jim Butcher, Lev Grossman, Sherilynn Kenyon, Carrie Vaughn, and Brandon Sanderson are among the standout contributors, and fans of Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series won’t want to miss the creator’s featured novella “The Princess and the Queen”. Intensify your thrills by listening to Dangerous Women in Playaway format, an easy-to-use portable player that holds an entire audiobook. Skip to the stories and narrators that tempt you most, but don’t be surprised if you devour them all.

Curious about Playaway and what the format has to offer?  Join us for Playaway Day on Saturday, February 1, 1-4 p.m., for giveaways and more information.

By Readers' Advisor on January 27, 2014 Categories: Audiobooks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Historical Fiction, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

New: Audiobooks, Fantasy, and Sci-Fi

Every Friday the Library will bring you two short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Audiobooks

Doctor Who: A History book cover

Bones in her Pocket book cover

Execution of Noa P Singleton book cover

 

1. Sister Mother Husband Dog by Delia Ephron

2. Hostage by Kay Hooper

3. Queen of the Air: A True Story of Love and Tragedy at the Circus by Dean N. Jensen

4. The Daughters of Mars by Thomas Keneally

5. Doctor Who: A History by Alan Kistler

6. Innocence by Dean Koontz

7. The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa

8. This is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett

9. Bones in her Pocket by Kathy Reichs

10. The Execution of Noa P. Singleton by Elizabeth L. Silver

 

New: Fantasy and Sci-fi Books

 Halo Silentium book cover

Ascension book cover

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover

1. Halo: Silentium by Greg Bear

2. Iron Night by M.L. Brennan

3. Shift by Hugh Howey

4. Last to Rise by Francis Knight

5. Ascension by Jacqueline Koyanagi

6. In Retrospect by Ellen Larson

7. Rex Regis by L.E. Modesitt

8. Rise Again Below Zero by Ben Tripp

9. Melancholy of Mechagirl by Catherynne Valente

10. Invasive Species by Joseph Wallace

By Readers' Advisor on January 24, 2014 Categories: Audiobooks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, New Arrivals

Fiction: The Dinosaur Feather by S.J. Gazan

The Dinosaur Feather book coverAnna is two weeks away from defending her thesis when her academic supervisor – the highly respected, though universally despised – Dr. Lars Helland, drops dead in his office at the University of Copenhagen. As if being a PhD hopeful and a single mom wasn’t hard enough, Anna’s thesis was on Helland’s bloody lap when he died. Police Superintendent Søren Marhauge has to unravel whodunit, but every scientist around Helland, every student, and even his ex-wife have a grudge or something to hide. Picked as one of the best mysteries of 2013 by NPR, The Dinosaur Feather by S.J. Gazan is perfect for those who like Scandinavian or academic thrillers.

By Readers' Advisor on January 23, 2014 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

Staff Pick: The World Without Us by Alan Weisman

Larry staff picks photoThe World Without Us describes the relationship between humans and nature using science with a dash of philosophy to imagine what would happen if the earth was suddenly without us. The human impact on nature and the restorative abilities of the earth are clearly explained in this pop science read.

By Readers' Advisor on January 21, 2014 Categories: All Staff Picks, Books, Nonfiction, Picks by Larry

Fiction: The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly by Sun-mi Hwang

Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly book coverA two-million-copy bestseller in Korea, Sun-mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly is an elegant little story that can be appreciated on several levels. Sprout is a caged hen who longs for freedom and motherhood. Her difficulty in laying leads to her being left for dead, but the help of a misfit mallard offers a second chance. The deceptive simplicity of this plot keeps the pages turning, and spare line drawings by Japanese artist Nomoco add to the storybook tone. However, for readers who are intrigued by allegory, there are rich lessons of tenacity, optimism, sacrifice, and individuality. As in books like Animal Farm or Jonathan Livingston Seagull, sometimes animals can teach us how to be better people.

By Readers' Advisor on January 20, 2014 Categories: Books

New: Historical Fiction and Romance

Every Friday the Library will bring you two short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Historical Fiction Books

Paris Architect book cover

Signature of All Things book cover

Marching to Zion book cove

Morning Glory book cover

Drowning Guard book cover

Belle cora book cover

In the Night of Time book cover

Windsor Faction book cover

New: Romance Books

Law Man book cover

Pirate Bride book cover

Love After War book cover

Foreplay book cover

Big Sky Secrets book cover

Love Burns Bright book cover

Born Wild book cover

Lasat Man on Earth book cover

By Readers' Advisor on January 17, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, New Arrivals, Romance

Book Discussion Questions: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw book cover

SPOILER WARNING: These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points, if you have not read the book.

 

Title: The Turn of the Screw
Author: Henry James
Page Count: 134
Genre: Literary horror
Tone: Ambiguous, leisurely, literary

 

1. The job: to tend to two orphans in a country mansion full of rarely-seen servants with absolutely no oversight from the children’s remaining family. Do you think this job was unusual for the Victorian era? Why did the governess take the job? Would you have taken the job?

2. Is the Governess the first person to her position or were there others before her?

3. How would you describe the Governess as a person? Do you think she cared for the children?

4. What did you think of the children’s uncle? Do you think he cared for the children? Why do you think he never wanted to be contacted about their conduct or progress?

5. There are several unnamed characters in this book – the Governess and the Uncle. Why do you think Henry James never named them? Did you notice the characters were unnamed? What power does a name have?

6. Who is Mrs. Grose? Do the children trust her? Does the Governess trust her? Does Mrs. Grose trust the Governess?

7. The Governess has an ideal start with Flora and then Miles comes home from boarding school for the summer. A letter appears shortly after from Miles’ school saying he was expelled. Why was he expelled? Did the Governess talk to Miles about his expulsion? Why or why not? Would you have talked to Miles about it?

8. Did the Governess write Miles’ uncle about his expulsion? Why or why not?

9. What are other examples of people being vague or unnecessarily mysterious in The Turn of the Screw?

10. Who is Mr. Quint? Who is Miss Jessel? How were they connected to one another? How did the Governess first come across knowledge of Quint and Jessel?

11. Do you think the ghosts of Quint and Jessel were real?

12. Do you think the children saw the ghosts of Quint and Jeseel?

13. Was the Governess a heroic woman trying to protect the children from evil influence…or do you think she was hallucinating and losing her mind?

14. Why do you think the governess was so slow to write the children’s uncle? Did she ever actually write him? If she did, what happened to the letter?

15. Did the children write their uncle? What happened to their letters? Is there a reasonable explanation for why the Governess did not post them?

16. Did you find the children, Miles and Flora, to be lovely or sinister?

17. Did the children ever turn on the Governess? If so, how and why?

18. Miles asks the Governess when he is going back to school. It is here that we start to see his personality. What is Miles like? How does the Governess respond to his inquiries?

19. Corruption is a word often used by the Governess. What do you think this word means to her and to this story?

20. The Governess and Mrs. Grose find Flora playing outside. The Governess swears she sees the ghost of Miss Jessel across a stream from them. Can Flora see the ghost? What happens to Flora and the Governess’ relationship after this sighting?

21. Where does Mrs. Grose take Flora?

22. What happens between Miles and the Governess while Mrs. Grose and Flora are gone?

23. Do you think Miles’ death was an accident? Do you think it could have been averted?

24. What are words you would use to describe The Turn of the Screw? What genre is it?

25. What makes a good suspense novel? What makes a good horror novel? Did The Turn of the Screw make a good horror or suspense novel?

26. What is the meaning of the title?

27. Have you seen (and would you recommend) any of the movies based on The Turn of the Screw?

 

Other Resources

Random House book discussion questions
Goodreads reviews
The New Yorker review
SparkNotes for the book
Wikipedia page for the book

 

If you liked The Turn of the Screw, try…

The Woman in Black by Susan Hill
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
The White People and Other Weird Stories by Arthur Machen

The Woman in Black book cover     The Haunting of Hill House coverThe White People and Other Weird Stories cover

By Readers' Advisor on January 15, 2014 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Horror

Staff Pick: The Testing by Joelle Charbonneau

Colleen staff picks photoThe Testing is not your average dystopian! To attend college, those who live in the United Commonwealth must undertake the Testing. For Cia, who desperately wants to attend college, the Testing is more dangerous than she could imagine and it’s not a fight to pass, but a fight to survive!

By Readers' Advisor on January 14, 2014 Categories: All Staff Picks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Picks by Colleen

New: Fiction and Nonfiction

Every Friday the Library will bring you two short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Get your reading glasses on, because here we go!

New: Fiction Books

Mercy Snow book cover

What I Had Before I had you book cover

Andrew's Brain book cover

Today I am a Boy book cover

Invention of Wings book cover

Under the Jeweled Sky book cover

Still Life with Bread Crumbs book cover

What We've Lost is Nothing book cover

New: Nonfiction Books

Short Guide to a Long Life book cover

Thing I've Learned from Dying book cover

Empire of Necessity book cover

Accidental Universe book cover

Talk about a Dream book cover

Polio Wars book coverLittle Failure book cover

Body Counts book cover

By Readers' Advisor on January 10, 2014 Categories: Books, New Arrivals, Nonfiction

Nonfiction: Brassaï: Paris Nocturne

Brassai: Paris NocturneBrassaï moved to Paris in 1924. He slept all day and roamed the streets at night, photographing the moonlit Montparnasse quarter and beyond. Street toughs grinned broadly for him, prostitutes coyly raised thinly-lined eyebrows, and young couples necking on benches ignored the photographer entirely. Brassaï may have been called boring by his friend (and famed writer) Henry Miller, but his work is everything and anything but dull. There are no grittier, livelier images of Depression-era, European nightlife than what Brassaï captured. If you like black and white gangster movies, unflinching photography, or just want a conversation-starter of a coffee table book, try Brassaï: Paris Nocturne.

By Readers' Advisor on January 9, 2014 Categories: Art, Books, Nonfiction