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What is the Mount Prospect Community Reading?

Picture of Response Display

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Displayed around the Library are the reviews, theme songs, and readalikes Adult Summer Reading participants are sharing! See what your fellow community members are reading and suggesting, and make sure you sign up for Summer Reading to add your voice!

Below are a few of the entries so far:

Cover of The Exile Exile by Diana Gabaldon is GREAT because I have read all the books in this series, but this is the only one told from the other main character’s point of view.

Cover of Hardest Peace
My theme song for The Hardest Peace by Kara Tibbetts is “It is Well with My Soul” because through her battle with cancer God was with her and carried her home.

Cover of Murder in Mesopotamia
Murder in Mesopotamia by Agatha Christie is favorable because the narrator of the story was so catty against all the other women. Also, Poirot does the best deconstruction of the crime.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover of Yes Please
Yes Please by Amy Poehler is FANTASTIC because it’s fun to listen to her observations on working moms.

Cover of Emily and Einstein
Emily and Einstein by Linda Francis Lee is a whimsical read because it has fantasy, romance, and human reflection all wrapped up in a thoughtful bundle.

Cover of Perfect Letter
The Perfect Letter by Chris Harrison is a well-written romance by The Bachelor host because the language is descriptive and the storyline flows. He even has a rose on the bottom of a page in the middle of the book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover of Dare to Die
My theme song for Dare to Die by Carolyn Hart is “Better Days” by the Goo Goo Dolls because ten years after the deaths of two friends, everyone is still healing, especially Iris who meets her death trying to make amends for the past.

Cover of Finding Me
Finding Me by Michelle Knight is INSPIRING because the victim was brave and never gave up.

Cover of Vanishing Girls
Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver is thought-provoking because I wonder if you can ever really understand the relationship between sisters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover of The Martian
The Martian by Andy Weir is a big thumbs up because it is very exciting, thrilling, and fun science fiction for the non-science fiction reader.

Cover of The Middle Place
My theme song for The Middle Place by Kelly Corrigan is “The Remedy” by Jason Mraz because it’s a good reflection of the hardships combined with a solid sense of humor that Kelly faced in the book.

Cover of The Nightingale
My readalikes for The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah  are two WWII novels set in france: Sarah’s Key because it similarily goes from present to past and Suite Francaise because it has more of the same feel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 12, 2015 Categories: 2015 Summer Reading, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense, Nonfiction, Romance

Book Discussion Questions: Where’d You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple

Cover of Where'd You Go BernadetteTitle: Where’d You Go Bernadette
Author: Maria Semple
Page Count: 330 pages
Genre: Humorous Fiction
Tone: Offbeat, Exuberant

Summary:
Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she’s a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she’s a disgrace; to design mavens, she’s a revolutionary architect, and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom.

Then Bernadette disappears. It began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica. But Bernadette’s intensifying allergy to Seattle—and people in general—has made her so agoraphobic that a virtual assistant in India now runs her most basic errands.

To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, secret correspondence—creating a compulsively readable and touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter’s role in an absurd world.

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

1. How did the epistolary format impact your reading? Did it make it more intimate?

2. Much of the beginning of the book focused on Bernadette’s relationship with Audrey Griffin. What did you think of Audrey? Why do you think she and Bernadette didn’t get along?

3. What did you think of Bernadette and Bea’s relationship?

4. When Bernadette “escaped” from the intervention, she asked Audrey to send all the emails to Bea, and said “I know it’s a lot, but she can handle it. I’d rather ruin her with the truth than ruin her with lies.” What did you think about that?

5. Did Audrey’s character change or did we just get a new perspective?

6. Did your opinion of Bernadette change when you found out she was a successful architect?

7. Paul Jellinak brought up the point that Bernadette only created 2 houses and both were for herself. Do you think she could have had a career in architecture with actual clients?

8. Who’s fault was it that the 20 mile house was destroyed? Did Bernadette have any extenuating circumstances in regards to her actions?

9. Ellie Sito criticized Bernadette for not being tough enough. She would knit as she worked. Do you think woman then or now need to take on male stereotypes to be successful?

10. Why didn’t she fix up her house in Seattle?

11. Did you find any of this novel to be spiritual?

12. In an email to Manjula, Bernadette was discussing how much she disliked Canadians because of how everybody was equal. She said, “Some people are extraordinary and should be treated as such”. What do you think of this statement?

13. Why do you think Bernadette didn’t discuss her feelings of failure with her husband? Why did she write that soul-bearing letter to Paul Jellinac instead?

14. What did you think of Paul’s response: “Are you done?  You can’t honestly believe any of this nonsense.  People like you must create.  If you don’t create, Bernadette, you will become a menace to society.”

15. What did you think of Elgin Branch’s character? Was there enough meat to him?

16. What were your thoughts on the TED talk?

17. Do you think Elgie loves Bernadette now? Did he love her in the past?

18. Elgie was furious with Bernadette for denuding the hillside and causing the cave-in that destroyed the Griffens house. Why was he so furious? Was he right to be that mad?

19. Why was Elgie so bent on getting Bernadette committed?

20. During the intervention, Elgin let Soo-Lin stay. What are your thoughts on that? Would you have done the same?

21. Why did Dr. Kurtz resign after the intervention?

22. What does the future hold for Bernadette and Elgie’s marriage?

23. How do you think Bernadette will react to Soo-Lin’s pregnancy ?

24. Do you think that there are any true victims in the novel, if so who and why?

25. What did you think of VAV (victims against victimhood)?

26. Do you identify with any of the characters?

Other Resources:

Lit Lovers’ Reading Guide
Book Club Companion Discussion Questions
Video Interview with Maria Semple
Q and A with Maria Semple
Semple’s exploration of Microsoft

If you like Where’d You Go Bernadette, you might like…

Cover of The Financial Lives of the Poets Cover of Man at the Helm Cover of The Family Fang

 

 

 

 

The Financial Lives of the Poets by Jess Walter
Man at the Helm by Nina Stibbe
The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson

Want help with your book discussion group? Check out tips, advice, and all the ways the Library can help support your group!

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 10, 2015 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Humor

Staff Pick: Murder at the Brightwell by Ashley Weaver

Picture of MartaCrisp characters, witty dialogue, engaging mystery, and an excellent love triangle create a strong debut in Murder at the Brightwell by Ashley Weaver. When Amory Ames travels to a seaside resort in order to help an old beau, she never intended to reignite her husband’s interest, much less get involved in a murder investigation.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 9, 2015 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense, Picks by Marta, Staff Picks

Books of the 2015 Tony Award Winners

Last night the American Theatre Wing handed out the 69th annual Tony Awards, and the biggest prizes went to gorgeous new interpretations of three inspiring works:

Best Musical: Fun Home
Fun Home book cover

Rummaging through a box of her father’s stuff, the memories of Alison’s uniquely dysfunctional family—her mother, brothers, and her volatile, brilliant, enigmatic father—connect with her in surprising, powerful and revealing new ways. Ingeniously adapted from Alison Bechdel’s acclaimed graphic memoir, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic is a refreshingly honest coming-of-age story about seeing your parents through grown-up eyes.

 

Best Play: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time book cover

In Mark Haddon’s bestselling novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Christopher, 15 years old, has an extraordinary brain – exceptional at math while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. When he falls under suspicion of killing Mrs. Shears’ dog Wellington, he records each fact about the event in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of the murder. However, his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey that upturns his world.

 

Best Revival of a Musical: The King and I
Anna and the King book cover

The classic Rodgers & Hammerstein show is based on the book Anna and the King of Siam. Weaving meticulously researched facts with beautifully imagined scenes, author Margaret Landon recreates the history of Anna Leonowens, a proper Englishwoman invited in the 1860s by King Mongkut of Siam to help him communicate with foreign governments and be the tutor to his children and favored concubines.

 

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on June 8, 2015 Categories: Awards, Books, Music, Nonfiction

New in Fantasy and Sci-Fi: Fairytales, Paranormal, Swords, and Beyond

Take a look at some of the newest fantasy and science fiction titles that have arrived at the Library! For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk or email us at readers@mppl.org to talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

Summer Reading has begun! Make sure to sign up and start logging what you’re reading!

Fairytales and Folklore

Cover of The GracekeepersThe Gracekeepers
by Kirsty Logan

Cover of UprootedUprooted
by Naomi Novik

Cover of From a High TowerFrom a High Tower
by Mercedes Lackey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imagining the Future

Cover of ArchangelArchangel
by Marguerite Reed

Cover of The AffinitiesThe Affinities
by Robert Charles Wilson

Cover of The Water KnifeThe Water Knife
by Paolo Bacigalupi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swords and Sorcery

Cover of The Invasion of the TearlingThe Invasion of the Tearling
by Erika Johansen

Cover of The Darkling ChildThe Darkling Child
by Terry Brooks

Cover of When the Heavens FallWhen the Heavens Fall
by Marc Turner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paranormal and Urban Fantasy

Cover of Shards of HopeShards of Hope
by Nailini Singh

Cover of Dead IceDead Ice
by Laurell K. Hamilton

Cover of Dreams of Shreds and TattersDreams of Shreds and Tatters
by Amanda Downum

 

 

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 5, 2015 Categories: Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, New Arrivals

Staff Pick: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Cover of We Were LiarsBarbara from Fiction/AV/Teen services suggests We Were Liars by E. Lockhart.

We Were Liars is narrated by Cadence Sinclaire Eastman, heiress to old money and one of “the liars,” an inseparable group made up of her cousins and their friend. The four liars have made the family private island just off Cape Cod their personal domain of fun and privilege every summer since they were eight. This ends the summer of Cadence’s fifteenth year when she suffers a mysterious injury that leaves her with amnesia, debilitating headaches, and a constant need for painkillers. The story unfolds two years later as she tries to piece together the mystery of that summer and the events that altered her life and her relationship with the liars. Lockhart weaves a hauntingly suspenseful tale of old money, privilege, and family dysfunction.

 

 

 

Looking for more books with hidden secrets? Try…

 

Cover of The Half Life of Molly Pierce
The Half Life of Molly Pierce
by Katrina Leno
Molly, a seventeen-year-old girl who suffers from dissociative identity disorder, has played host to Mabel, a completely distinct personality, for most her life. When Molly faces a crisis Mabel doesn’t know she can handle, Mabel lets Molly in on her secrets.

Cover of Before I go to Sleep
Before I Go to Sleep
by S.J. Watson
A fast paced thriller in which an amnesiac who, following a mysterious accident, cannot remember her past or form new memories, desperately tries to uncover the truth about who she is—and whom she can trust.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover of Black Out
Black Out
by Lisa Unger
A woman has to quickly piece together disturbing events–one of which is the murder of her psychologist–before her past comes to claim her future and her daughter.

Cover of Complicit
Complicit
by Stephanie Kuehn
Jamie’s mother was murdered when he was six. About seven years later, his sister Cate was incarcerated for burning down a neighbor’s barn, and now Jamie, fifteen, learns that Cate has been released and is coming back for him.

Cover of We are the Goldens
We Are the Goldens
by Dana Reinhardt
Since their parents’ divorce when they were young, Nell and her sister Layla have provided each other stability and support. When Layla starts to pull away, Nell discovers a secret: Layla is involved with one of their teachers. Nell struggles with what to do

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 4, 2015 Categories: Books, Picks by Barbara F., Staff Picks

Staff Pick- Playground: Mostly True Story of a Former Bully by Fifty Cent

Picture of DenisePlayground: The Mostly True Story of a Former Bully is a loosely autobiographical story written by rap artist 50 Cent.   He writes a realistic portrayal of teen bullying from the perspective of the bully and explores the reasons why bullies are created. You can read this in one sitting and have a whole new understanding of a topic which has become so prevalent in our society.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on June 2, 2015 Categories: Books, Picks by Denise, Staff Picks

We Asked Staff: What Do You Hope to Read This Summer?

Summer is growing closer! To some this means filling these warm sunny days up with activity after activity, while for others this means pausing all non-imminent responsibilities and relaxing. Regardless of how you choose to set the tempo of your days, we hope you make time for reading!

In honor of Read to the Rhythm, our Summer Reading Program running June 1-July 31, we asked Mount Prospect Library Staff what their reading hopes and dreams are for the summer. We’re planning on sharing the reading experiences of other Mount Prospect readers as well, so make sure you stop back here to see what your fellow community members are reading or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Anne S.
Research Services
Cover of Dead Wake
Dead Wake by Erik Larson—I hope I get to it, because I’m on the waiting list!

Nancy
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of The Secret History
I recently enjoyed Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, so this summer I am finally going to read The Secret History

Mary Jane
Research Services
Cover of Bad Monkey
I want to listen to the audio of Carl Hiaasen’s Bad Monkey on my husband’s and my driving trip to Alaska. It’s a new author for both of us so it will be fun to explore together.

Mary Jane
Research ServicesCover of The Lighthouse
I want to listen to P.D. James on our trip because I love a good mystery!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carol
Community Services
Cover of West of Sunset
The first book on my summer list is Stewart O’Nan’s West of Sunset, a fictionalization of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s time in Hollywood. I love reading about the 1920s and 1930s.

Carol
Community ServicesCover of Casual Vacancy
I might try J.K. Rowling’s Casual Vacancy. The plot looks interesting.

Carol
Community ServicesCover of Alexandria Quartet
I’d really like to finally finish Lawrence Durell’s Alexandria Quartet. It is four short novels in one large book, so I have been taking my time with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donna
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House
This summer I hope to read Kate Andersen Brower’s non-fiction book, The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House. The title is what peaked my interest

Elaine
Collection ManagementCover of On the Move
I am planning to read On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks because I think the author must be as fascinating as the stories he has written!

Diane
Fiction/AV/TeenCover of Uprooted
Uprooted by Naomi Novik! According to the many, many rave reviews on amazon.com, it looks like it will be a fantasy classic.

Mary
Youth ServicesCover of The Rosie Project
The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion. I’ve been meaning to read this forever!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janine
Circulation
Cover of Where'd You Go, Bernadette
I’m going to re-read Where’d You Go, Bernadette on audiobook. I loved the book the first time around, and have heard amazing things about the audiobook.

Janine
Circulation
Cover of The Sound and the Fury
I’m going to try to read The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. I’ve been too scared to attempt it in the past, but this summer I’ll rope my cousin in and we’ll get through it!

Janine
Circulation
Cover of The Sky is Everywhere
I want to read The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson, because I LOVED I’ll Give You the Sun and want to read more by her!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joyce
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of The Girl on the Train
I hope to listen to The Girl on the Train in audiobook because I love psychological thrillers.

Joyce
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of The Husband's Secret
I hope to listen to The Husband’s Secret in audiobook because I haven’t read Liane Moriarty previously.

John
IT Services
Cover of Wheel of Time series
I’ve been meaning to read the Wheel of Time series because my friend has been bugging me to for years. It’s a fantasy series similar to LotR but written more casually like ASoIaF (without a lot of the backstabbing and scheming).

John
IT Services
Cover of The Martian
I like science fiction and The Martian has accrued so much hype I figure at this point it’s essentially a must-read.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cathleen
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of Wolf Hall
I’m overdue for meaty historical fiction, and this will be the season I finally lose myself in the world of Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel.

Cathleen
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of Armada
For pure fun, imagination, action, and heart, Armada, Ernest Cline’s follow-up to Ready Player One, is at the top of my list.

Cathleen
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of X
As much as I adore Sue Grafton’s character of Kinsey Millhone, she is most vivid when voiced by Judy Kaye. Can’t wait for X!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary
Technical Services
Cover of The Girl Next DoorI will be reading one of the last books by my favorite author, Ruth Rendell: The Girl Next Door.

Kathi
Registration
Cover of Pirate HuntersThis summer I plan to read Pirate Hunters by Robert Kurson. His first two books (Crashing Through and Shadow Divers) were awesome; I met him and he’s a great guy!

Rebeca
Collection Management
Cover of The Night Manager The Night Manager is a must read for me as it’s soon to be a miniseries starring Tom Hiddleston.

Joe
Research Services
Cover of The CircleI’m going to try and read The Circle by Dave Eggers, because my boss has been recommending it for months!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linda
IT Services
Cover of The Thirteenth Tale
I am intrigued by reviews praising the atmospheric, historic thriller The Thirteenth Tale for “lovers of books about book lovers” about a famous, reclusive author known for fictionalizing her biography but who claims she will reveal her true family story now that she is dying.

Linda
IT Services
Cover of Sapiens
Earning great reviews as thoughtful, readable non-fiction, Sapiens explores how homo sapiens became the sole surviving human species and came to dominate all life on the planet and the consequences.

Linda
IT Services
Cover of The Silkworm
Having read Rowling/Galbraith’s first book in her new adult series, The Cuckoo’s Calling, I expect to also enjoy this second one, The Silkworm, as anyone who’s read Harry Potter knows her masterful writing skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carla
Administration
Cover of Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo
The American Institute of CPAs recommended Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo by Nicholas Carlson.

Carla
Administration
Cover of Good Leaders Ask Great Questions
Good Leaders Ask Great Questions by John Maxwell was also recommended by the American Institute of CPAs

Jenny
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of Half a King
I’m drawn to long epic fantasies during the summer, and have heard fantastic things about Joe Abercrombie’s Half a King.

Jenny
Fiction/AV/Teen
Cover of The First Bad Man
Miranda July has a knack for striking the perfect balance of offbeat hilarity and gut wrenching truths, which I’m hoping translates into The First Bad Man!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jo
Research Services
Cover of Foxcatcher
I’ve been meaning to read Foxcatcher by Mark Schultz ever since I saw the movie. The movie was so bizarre – I just want to find out more about the characters and the situation.

Jo
Research Services
Cover of The Rosie Effect
I’m looking forward to listening to The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion. I just finished The Rosie Project and it actually made me laugh out loud! Perfect for a long road trip!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in joining in on the reading fun? You can register for the Adult Summer Reading Program online or at the Fiction/AV/Teen Desk on the second floor, starting Monday, June 1st.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on May 29, 2015 Categories: Audiobooks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Literary, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense, Nonfiction, Romance, Staff Picks

Fiction: The Flame Alphabet by Ben Marcus

Cover of The Flame Alphabet

 

The sounds of children’s voices have become lethal to adults.

 

In order to survive, Sam and Claire must flee from their only child, Esther. Resigned yet determined, Sam pursues a cure as he reflects on the crumbling of civilization as America once knew. The Flame Alphabet is filled with a certain kind of horror where children become the enemy, yet is also layered with the relentless beauty of a father stubbornly fighting to keep his family together. Ben Marcus’ stunning and cadenced writing only adds emphasis to what is truly at the core of this bleak dystopian: the power and splendor of language in its ability to hurt and heal.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on May 28, 2015 Categories: Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Literary

Fiction: Wish You Were Here by Graham Swift

Wish You Were Here book cover“Our dead are never dead to us until we have forgotten them,” George Eliot wrote. “They know all our penitence, all our aching sense that their place is empty.”

The truth of these words scalds the characters of Man Booker Prize winner Graham Swift’s Wish You Were Here. When Jack receives word from the Ministry of Defence that his younger brother Tom was killed in Iraq, he must make arrangements to bring his remains back home to the Isle of Wight. This task forces Jack to confront complicated feelings toward not only his brother’s death but also his father’s, and the weight takes a toll on his relationships with the living as well. Evocative, slow-burning, and complex, this deceptively quiet novel depicts with graceful melancholy the relationships that haunt and enrich us.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on May 25, 2015 Categories: Books, Literary