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New: Fiction and Nonfiction Books

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

New: Fiction Books

Cover of The Children Act Cover of A Life of Intercepted Cover of 2 A.M. at the Cat's Pajamas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Children Act by Ian McEwan
A Life Intercepted 
by Charles Martin
2 A.M. at The Cat’s Pajamas by Marie-Helene Bertino

Cover of Awakening of Miss PrimCover of Everything I Never Told YouCover of Narrow Road to the Deep North

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Awakening of Miss Prim by Natalia Sanmartin Fenollera
Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng
The Narrow Road to the Deep North  by Richard Flanagan

New: Nonfiction Books

  Cover of The RooseveltsWhat If?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
The Roosevelts: An Intimate History by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns

 

Brown Girl DreamingNFdaring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Rewire  by Richard O’Connor
Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things by David Rose
Daring: My Passages by Gail Sheehy

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on September 12, 2014 Categories: Books, New Arrivals, Nonfiction

Fiction: Boomerang by Noelle August

Cover of BoomerangFun and flirty, Boomerang is told in the alternating perspectives of Mia and Ethan, two driven interns ready to start their careers at the new millennial dating website Boomerang.com. At a bar the night before the internship begins, Mia and Ethan accidentally meet and instantly connect. Their fantasy is short-lived as they learn the next morning they are competitors for a full-time position being offered to the best intern, and Boomerang.com has a strict policy against dating coworkers. While the couples’ forbidden chemistry is the story’s main focus, Noelle August also takes readers through the trials of finding a place in the world post-college in this energetic New Adult novel.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on September 11, 2014 Categories: Books

Fiction: Peaches for Monsieur le Curé by Joanne Harris

Peaches for Monsieur le Cure book coverSomeone once told me that, in France alone, a quarter of a million letters are delivered every year to the dead…What she didn’t tell me is that sometimes the dead write back.

These lines set the tone for a dramatic visit to Lansquenet, a rural village in France. Vianne Rochet, known for near-magical skills with chocolate, returns after an eight-year absence in response to a letter she receives from a deceased friend. The formerly Catholic village now contains a sizable Moroccan population, and the town is straining to contain two distinct communities. Peaches for Monsieur le Curé (or Peaches for Father Francis) by Joanne Harris has been honored as the 2014-2015 selection for the Suburban Mosaic program, which seeks to foster cultural understanding through literature. Ultimately, it is a wonderful story that blends enchantment and real-life conflict in a way that will touch our hearts and remind us what we all have in common.

By MPPL on September 8, 2014 Categories: Books

New: Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

New: Mystery Books

Cover of Gone Dead TrainCover of Death of PieCover of Murder in the Telephone Exchange

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Gone Dead Train by Lisa Turner
The Death of Pie by Tamar Myers
• Murder in the Telephone Exchange by June Wright

Cover of A Little Night MurderCover of The Secret PlaceCover of Canyon Sacrifice

The Secret Place by Tana French
Canyon Sacrifice by Scott Graham
A Little Night Murder by Nancy Martin

New: Thrillers and Suspense

Cover of Ice ShearCover of Peter Pan Must DieCover of The Beast in the Red Forest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ice Shear by M. P. Cooley
Peter Pan Must Die by John Verdon
The Beast in the Red Forest by Sam Eastland

Cover of A Colder WarCover of The WolfCover of Haunted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Colder War by Charles Cumming
The Wolf by Lorenzo Carcaterra
Haunted by Kay Hooper

By MPPL on September 5, 2014 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense, New Arrivals

Fiction: The Intern’s Handbook by Shane Kuhn

Shane Kuhn shows that Cover image of The Intern's Handbook just about anyone can be an assassin in the violent humorous thriller The Intern’s Handbook. Human Resources Inc., a company that trains assassins and inserts them into businesses as interns, is sending John Lago out to a law firm for his last mission before he retires at the age of 25. Written as if a real handbook, Lago shares his killer advice as he navigates a complex mission. Not only does Lago have to compete to keep his internship while maintaining a low profile, but he must manage unknown assassins, a ruthless handler, a sexy FBI agent, and the ever pressing question: what to do after retiring.

By MPPL on September 4, 2014 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

Staff Pick: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Barb B. staff picks photoThe Book Thief by Markus Zusak is superbly written almost in a poetic way. In 1939 Germany, Death has never been busier, yet it’s captivated by a young orphan who learns to find comfort in the written word. After the Nazis burn the town’s books, Liesel steals from the mayor’s own library and shares with a Jewish man hiding in her home. You will not be able to put this book down because of its award-winning writing.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on September 2, 2014 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction, Picks by Barb B., Staff Picks

Nonfiction: Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe by Tim Leong

Super Graphic book coverIf Guardians of the Galaxy has increased your appetite for fun with heroes, villains, and sharp images, Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe is just the companion you need. Tim Leong has combined imagination and analytics in a wild collection of graphs, charts, and tables that explores in glorious geeky detail the trivia that thrills true fans. Vibrantly colored infographics decipher the many affiliations of the Marvel universe or even the convergences of the big three superhero tropes. The diagrams aren’t limited to cape-wearers, so you’ll find data on stories as different as Persepolis, Tintin, and The Walking Dead. Rich with clever design and bold geometric definition, Super Graphic allows you to bask in the small details that add up to larger-than-life adventures.

By MPPL on September 1, 2014 Categories: Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Humor, Nonfiction

New: Audiobooks, Fantasy, and Sci-fi

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

New: Audiobooks

Cover of The Matchmaker Cover of Ten Percent HappierCover of Mr. Mercedes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Matchmaker  by Elin Hilderbrand
10% Happier by Dan Harris
Mr. Mercedes  by Stephen King

Cover of The Snow QueenCover of Unlocking PotentialCover of A Triple Knot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Snow Queen by Michael Cunningham
Unlocking Potential by Michael K. Simpson
A Triple Knot by Emma Campion

New: Fantasy and Sci-fi

The Book of Life Book CoverCover of Fool's AssassinCover of The Magician's Land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness
Fool’s Assassin by Robin Hobb
The Magician’s Land by Lev Grossman

Cover of Dark LightningCover of Lock InCover of Cibola Burning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Lightning by John Varley
Lock In by John Scalzi
Cibola Burn by James A. Corey

By MPPL on August 29, 2014 Categories: Audiobooks, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, New Arrivals

Fiction: The Girl Who Fell from the Sky by Heidi Durrow

Cover image of The Girl Who Fell from the SkyEleven- year-old Rachel is the sole survivor of a horrific tragedy claiming the lives of her mother, brother, and sister. With a father too grief-stricken to take care of her, Rachel is sent to live with her grandmother in Portland, Oregon. For the first time Rachel, who is biracial, deals with racism from all different members of her community. Woven in with Rachel’s coming-of-age tale is the story of the emotional events leading to the family’s tragedy and the rippling effect of decisions big and small. Peppered with heartbreaking insights and vivid imagery, The Girl Who Fell from the Sky by Heidi Durrow is an absorbing story about survival, the mistakes humans make, family, and the role race has in identity.

By MPPL on August 28, 2014 Categories: Books, Literary

Book Discussion Questions: The House on the Strand by Daphne du Maurier

House on the Strand book cover

SPOILER WARNING: These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points, if you have not read the book.

 

Title: The House on the Strand
Author: Daphne du Maurier
Page Count: 298
Genre: Literary fantasy, Gothic fiction, Time travel
Tone: Mysterious, Atmospheric, Suspenseful

 

1.  Were you caught up in the book right away? Did you find it hard to follow?

2.  How did you feel about the narrative moving back and forth between time periods? Several critics have commented on the immense skill with which du Maurier keeps tension on both levels. Would you agree?

3.  Which time period /storyline did you find more interesting?

4.  What was your opinion of Richard, the narrator?

5.  Being the straight-laced man that he was, why did Richard try Magnus’ drug in the first place?

6.  How would you characterize the relationship between Magnus and Richard?

7.  What differences were there in the ways Magnus and Richard approached the experiments?

8.  Why do you think Roger was used as the link/guide/alter ego?

9.  Why did John Willis corroborate Richard’s testimony at the inquest?

10.  How important to the story is Vita? Why so?

•  Did you like her? Feel sorry for her? Were you increasingly annoyed by/with her as Dick was?
•  How would you characterize Richard and Vita’s relationship? Why is this so?
•  Why didn’t Richard tell Vita about the drug, especially after she became suspicious of him having an affair and acting so erratically?
•  In Latin, “Vita” translates as “life”. Do you think this was an intentional choice for du Maurier? What might this understanding add?

11.  Did you trust Dr. Powell? Was he right to release Richard when he did?

12.  What was the allure for Richard to keep going back to the past?

13.  Would you agree that this is a “story of addiction”? If so, was he addicted to the drug itself or to the stories he witnessed?

14. Was Richard actually time-traveling or merely hallucinating?

•  Were you satisfied with Dr. Powell’s theories at the end of the book?
•  If it were the drug, why did Magnus and Richard travel back to same period?

15.  Would you say the tone of the story is approving? marveling? objective?

16.  What did you think of the end of the book? Was it satisfying to you?

•  What really happened to Richard?
•  Du Maurier once wrote, “What about the hero of The House on the Strand? What did it mean when he dropped the telephone at the end of the book? I don’t really know, but I rather think he was going to be paralysed for life. Don’t you?” Does her statement surprise you?

17.  This book was written in 1969. Is the subject still topical? Would you recommend this book to others?

18.  How do du Maurier’s descriptions deepen and reinforce the themes in the novel?

19.  Growing up, du Maurier disliked the expectations and limitations of being a girl. How well does she write the male perspective? What other attitudes toward society are revealed in her story and characters?

20.  Du Maurier’s only disappointment with The House on the Strand was that a film version was not made. It was her favorite of all her books, and she had written it almost as a film script. Do you think it a story that could be successfully adapted as a movie or miniseries?

 

Other Resources

Daphne du Maurier author site
author interview from Kilmarth, a central location in The House on the Strand
BBC article:  “Walking in du Maurier’s Footsteps”
“The Cornwall of Daphne du Maurier”, originally published in British Heritage magazine

 

If you liked The House on the Strand, try…

The Distant Hours by Kate Morton
The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

Distant Hours book coverThirteenth Tale book coverOutlander book cover

 

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on August 27, 2014 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Literary