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Staff Pick: Now, Voyager

Cover of Now VoyagerDiane of Fiction/AV/Teen services suggests Now, Voyager

Hollywood cranked out women’s pictures, or weepies, with excessive emotional fervor from the 1930s to 1950s. For many historians, 1942’s Now, Voyager starring Bette Davis, Paul Henreid, and Claude Rains, is the definitive weepie. Davis portrays Charlotte Vale, a dowdy Boston spinster, oppressed and driven to a nervous breakdown by a domineering mother. She recovers with the help of a kindly psychiatrist, played by Claude Rains, who runs a mental health sanitarium. After leaving the doctor’s care, Charlotte takes an ocean voyage where she finds self-confidence and love through a romance with an unhappily-married man, played by Paul Henreid, and ends up taking his emotionally troubled daughter under her wing.

 

For more movies featuring Bette Davis as the headstrong lead try

Cover of Dark Victory
Dark Victory follows the life of a fast moving Long Island socialite who skids to a stop when she discovers that she has less than a year to live.

Cover of The Letter
Set on a rubber plantation in Malaya, The Letter centers on a woman’s reasons for killing a man who was a close family friend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover of The Old MaidHeadstrong, beautiful Tina has nothing but disdain for her Aunt Charlotte, in The Old Maid, but unloved, unlovable Aunt Charlotte is really Tina’s mother, whose romance with a Civil War soldier that didn’t return resulted in Tina’s birth.

Cover of Deception
World War II has separated pianist Christine Radcliffe from her great love, cellist Karel Novak. Thinking Karel has been killed in action, she is unexpectedly reunited with him. Pulling off the ultimate Deception, she’ll lie to keep her shameful past as the mistress of a wealthy composer a secret.

Cover of The Great Lie
In The Great Lie, tempestuous and ambitious concert pianist Sandra shares a bond with down-to-earth Maggie and her little boy, Pete. No one knows that Pete is Sandra’s son – the son of the heroic aviator both women love.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 27, 2015 Categories: Movies and TV, Picks by Diane, Staff Picks

New in Historical Fiction: Girl Athletes, The Effects of War, Thrillers, The Creative Life

Every other Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books. Take a look below to check out some of the newest historical fiction titles that have arrived at the Library.

Girl Athletes

Cover of The Fair FightThe Fair Fight
by Anna Freeman

Cover of Girl RunnerGirl Runner
by Carrie Snyder

Cover of GwendolenGwendolen
by Diana Souhami

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Effects of War

Cover of A Slant of LightA Slant of Light
by Jeffrey Lent

Cover of The SympathizerThe Sympathizer
by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Cover of The Last Flight of Poxl WestThe Last Flight of Poxl West
by Daniel Torday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical Thrillers

Cover of Whisper HollowWhisper Hollow
by Chris Cander

Cover of The Bone Tree The Bone Tree
by Greg Iles

Cover of Garden of LiesGarden of Lies
by Amanda Quick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Creative Life

Cover of Mademoiselle Chanel Mademoiselle Chanel
by C.W. Gortner

Cover of The Bridal Chair The Bridal Chair
by Gloria Goldreich

Cover of Paris RedParis Red
by Maureen Gibbon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk or email us at readers@mppl.org to talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 24, 2015 Categories: Books, Historical Fiction

Fiction: The Fire Sermon by Francesca Haig

Cover of The Fire SermonIt is four hundred years after the nuclear apocalypse. All humans are born as twins: the flawless, superior Alpha at the top of society and the deformed, mutated Omega shunned to the bottom. Cass is an Omega with a rare mutation: the ability to see into the future. Zach, her other half, is the Alpha, and as he rapidly rises in rank he puts Cass in more danger, for if one twin dies the other twin dies too. Francesca Haig has crafted a well-thought out world to deliver The Fire Sermon, an action-packed story of hatred, betrayal, and one girl unknowingly on her way to change the world.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 23, 2015 Categories: Books, Fantasy & Sci-Fi

Book Discussion Questions: Empty Mansions by Bill Dedman and Paul Clarke Newell

Cover of Empty MansionsTitle: Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune
Author: Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell, JR.
Page Count: 456 pages
Genre:  Nonfiction, Biographies
Tone: Suspenseful, Extravagant

Summary:
When Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Bill Dedman noticed a property listing for a grand estate that had been unoccupied for nearly sixty years, he stumbled into one of the most surprising American stories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Empty Mansions is a rich tale of wealth and loss, complete with copper barons, Gilded Age opulence, and backdoor politics. At its heart is a reclusive 104-year-old heiress named Huguette Clark. Dedman has collaborated with Huguette’s cousin, Paul Clark Newell, Jr., one of the few relatives to have had frequent conversations with her, to tell a fairy tale in reverse: the bright, talented daughter who is born into an almost royal family of amazing wealth and privilege, yet who secrets herself away from the outside world. Empty Mansions reveals a complete picture of the enigmatic Huguette Clark, heiress to one of the greatest fortunes in American history, a woman who had not been photographed in public since the 1920s.

SPOILER WARNING:
These book discussion questions are highly detailed and will ruin plot points if you have not read the book.

1. Is it difficult to understand why Huguette chose not to live in any of her beautiful homes for the last 20 years of her life?

2. Huguette preferred solitude for so much of her life, and then apparently enjoyed the hustle & bustle of the hospital environment. Does this make sense to you? Does it help explain her decision to spend so many years in the hospital? What other factors might have contributed to her choice?

3. Is there a “right” way to spend or give money? Do you believe this depends on if you’ve earned the money yourself or if you’ve received it through an inheritance?

4. Why did Huguette prefer giving to individuals versus institutions?

5. Why do we care how wealthy people spend their money?

6. Consider Andrew Carnegie’s theory (pg. 113) of the three stages of life – education, making money, and giving all the money away. What are your thoughts on this when applied to W.A. Clark and Huguette?

7. How important was control to Huguette (with her environment and in her relationships for example)?

8. Her wealth aside, was there anything unusual about Huguette?

9. What traits of Huguette are to be admired? What traits of hers were not so admirable? What were some of her gifts? How about her limitations?

10. What makes her a challenging biographical subject? Does her limited circle of contacts make her more or less interesting to read about? What makes her a good biographical subject?

11. Do you believe Huguette suffered from mental illness? What is the authors’ stance on this?

12. What lingering mysteries about Huguette remain? Does this book answer questions or raise additional questions?

13. Huguette is reported to have said “we are all a little peculiar” — do you agree? What does the term “eccentric” mean to you? Do you believe the term has an association with wealth or not necessarily?

14. The authors point out at the end (pg. 354) that Huguette was not necessarily as isolated as we might think – she had regular visitors, had nurse Hadassah, was pen pal to many, etc. What are your thoughts on this?

15. Here we have a book written about someone who intensely guarded her private life and went to great lengths to avoid the spotlight (for example, avoiding selling items out of fear of attention it might draw). Are there any ethical issues to consider with this book?

16. Consider the title — Do you find empty houses troubling or wasteful? If so, does the size or value of the house affect your level of concern? (Fancy vs. plain, huge vs. modest, unique vs. ordinary)

17. Do you believe the title was a good choice? Does it reflect the content of the book? Would you describe Huguette’s life as mysterious? Is it fair to single out Huguette’s “spending of a great American fortune” when she wasn’t his only heir and her share of W.A.’s estate was just one-fifth?

18. What was your response to the detail of gifts and donations – fascinated? Disgusted? Puzzled? Wonder? Why do you think the authors included such detail? (examples: page 247, 261, 264-5)

19. Why did the authors devote a large portion of the book to W. A. Clark?

20. In what ways did Huguette differ from her father? What character traits did she have that resembled his?

21. Do you like how the book was structured? It is not always chronological; did you like this or not?

22. How did the “Conversations with Huguette” sections affect your reading experience?

23. What did the authors hope to achieve by writing this book? Do you think they succeeded? What do they want us to know about Huguette?

24. Are the authors objective and balanced in their portrayal of Huguette? Do you think other authors might have presented a more sensational account of her life?

Other Resources

Images from Huguette’s life
Lit Lovers’ Discussion Questions
Video Interview with Bill Dedman
NPR article on auction of Huguette’s items

If you liked Empty Mansions, try…

Cover of The Secret Rooms Cover of A Curious Man Cover of The Phantom of Fifth Avenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Secret Rooms by Catherine Bailey
A Curious Man by Neal Thompson
The Phantom of Fifth Avenue by Meryl Gordon

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 22, 2015 Categories: Book Discussion Questions, Books, Nonfiction

Staff Pick: From the Land of the Moon by Milena Agus

Picture of JennyThis poetic gem translated from Italian is weighted with sorrow. Written in flashbacks spanning three generations, a girl shares the story of her Sardinian grandmother who has been in search for perfect love and declared mad as a result. Milena Agus’ From the Land of the Moon is a study of unreliable narrators, misunderstanding, and the reaches of the heart.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 21, 2015 Categories: Books, Literary, Picks by Jenny, Staff Picks

Fiction: Hiding the Past by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

Hiding the Past book coverGenealogists are, by definition, detectives. They start with one or more clues, apply patience and a great deal of detail work, and follow the threads wherever they lead, hoping for a satisfying conclusion. Nathan Dylan Goodwin’s Hiding the Past plays those similarities to great effect by creating an original genealogical mystery novel. A British man with no family history calls on expert Morton Farrier to trace his roots but is dead by apparent suicide the day after they meet. As Farrier doggedly investigates, others are determined to keep past events from seeing the light of the present, including a possible WWII conspiracy. However, even mounting danger won’t keep a dedicated researcher from his answers, and his adventures are worth scaling this particular family tree.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on April 20, 2015 Categories: Books, Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense

New Arrivals: Fiction and NonFiction Books

Every Friday the Library will bring you short lists of buzz-worthy books in a rotating series of popular genres.

For these and other fresh reads, stop by the second floor Fiction/AV/Teen desk. While there, talk to a Readers’ Advisor about new and old titles tailored to your taste.

New: Fiction Books

Cover of Our Endless Numbered Days Cover of The Turner House Cover of Happiness for Beginners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller
The Turner House by Angela Flourney
Happiness for Beginners by Katherine Center

Cover of Emma Cover of Where All Light Tends to Go Cover of The Listener

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emma by Alexander McCall Smith
Where All Light Tends to Go by David Joy
The Listener by Rachel Basch

New: Nonfiction Books

Cover of Capital DamesCover of Very Good Lives Cover of The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Dames by Cokie Roberts
Very Good Lives by J.K. Rowling
The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae

Cover of All Who Do Not Return Cover of Experimental Homebrewing Cover of So You've Been Publicly Shamed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Who Do Not Return by Shulem Deen
Experimental Homebrewing by Drew Beechum and Denny Conn
So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 17, 2015 Categories: Books, Literary, New Arrivals

Fiction: Life With Mr. Dangerous by Paul Hornschemeier

Cover of Life With Mr. DangerousPaul Hornschemeier vibrantly paints the picture of a 26-year-old who feels stuck. Dragged down by the repetition of working in retail and terrible relationships, Amy Beir turns to phone conversations with a friend who moved to San Francisco and the cartoon Mr. Dangerous to keep her sanity. Hornschemeier uses colorful simplistic drawings  to slice out the anxieties of daily life, from being gifted pink unicorn sweatshirts by her mother to the pressure of leaving voice mails. Laced with humor and touches of the surreal Life With Mr. Dangerous captures the struggle of growing up when you’re supposed to be a grown up already.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 16, 2015 Categories: Books

Staff Pick: The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly

Picture of ColleenThe Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly on audiobook will appeal to almost anyone! Narrator Adam Grupper becomes main character, Mickey Haller, and brings non-stop action into this courtroom drama. His character voicing and pacing elevate this audio to an easy listen whether you are new to audiobooks or an avid listener.

By Jenny, Readers' Advisor on April 14, 2015 Categories: Audiobooks, Picks by Colleen, Staff Picks

Movies and TV: Enchanted April

Enchanted April DVD coverAn irresistible invitation:  To Those Who Appreciate Wisteria and Sunshine, a Small Medieval Italian Castle on the Shores of the Mediterranean to be Let Furnished for the Month of April. Four ladies, previously strangers to one another, answer the call to escape to Italy for one glorious Enchanted AprilIt is 1920s London, and the dreariness of unfulfilling routine contrasts starkly with the promise of a brightly-lit, languid holiday in the countryside. It doesn’t take long in this restful place for the visitors to shed their cares, form new friendships, and rediscover the beauty in both themselves and their other lives. Be inspired by a welcome respite and a fresh perspective, even if your own getaway is simply a vicarious one.

By Cathleen, Readers' Advisor on April 13, 2015 Categories: Movies and TV